A report on BasebandModulation and Line code

Spectrum of a baseband signal, energy E per unit frequency as a function of frequency f. The total energy is the area under the curve.
Categorization for signal modulation based on data and carrier types
An arbitrary bit pattern in various binary line code formats
Comparison of the equivalent baseband version of a signal and its AM-modulated (double-sideband) RF version, showing the typical doubling of the occupied bandwidth.
A low-frequency message signal (top) may be carried by an AM or FM radio wave.
Waterfall plot of a 146.52 MHz radio carrier, with amplitude modulation by a 1,000 Hz sinusoid. Two strong sidebands at + and - 1 kHz from the carrier frequency are shown.
A carrier, frequency modulated by a 1,000 Hz sinusoid. The modulation index has been adjusted to around 2.4, so the carrier frequency has small amplitude. Several strong sidebands are apparent; in principle an infinite number are produced in FM but the higher-order sidebands are of negligible magnitude.
Schematic of 4 baud, 8 bit/s data link containing arbitrarily chosen values

In telecommunications and signal processing, baseband is the range of frequencies occupied by a signal that has not been modulated to higher frequencies.

- Baseband

the line-coded signal (the baseband signal) undergoes further pulse shaping (to reduce its frequency bandwidth) and then is modulated (to shift its frequency) to create an RF signal that can be sent through free space.

- Line code

The frequency band occupied by the modulation signal is called the baseband, while the higher frequency band occupied by the modulated carrier is called the passband.

- Modulation

Digital baseband transmission, also known as line coding, aims at transferring a digital bit stream over baseband channel, typically an unfiltered wire, contrary to passband transmission, also known as carrier-modulated transmission.

- Baseband

The latter methods both involve relatively simple Line Codes, as often used in local buses, and complicated baseband signalling schemes such as used in DSL.

- Modulation
Spectrum of a baseband signal, energy E per unit frequency as a function of frequency f. The total energy is the area under the curve.

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