Categorization for signal modulation based on data and carrier types
Spectrum of a baseband signal, energy E per unit frequency as a function of frequency f. The total energy is the area under the curve.
Illustration of the spectrum of AM and SSB signals. The lower side band (LSB) spectrum is inverted compared to the baseband. As an example, a 2 kHz audio baseband signal modulated onto a 5 MHz carrier will produce a frequency of 5.002 MHz if upper side band (USB) is used or 4.998 MHz if LSB is used.
A low-frequency message signal (top) may be carried by an AM or FM radio wave.
Comparison of the equivalent baseband version of a signal and its AM-modulated (double-sideband) RF version, showing the typical doubling of the occupied bandwidth.
Frequency-domain depiction of the mathematical steps that convert a baseband function into a single-sideband radio signal.
Waterfall plot of a 146.52 MHz radio carrier, with amplitude modulation by a 1,000 Hz sinusoid. Two strong sidebands at + and - 1 kHz from the carrier frequency are shown.
A Collins KWM-1, an early Amateur Radio transceiver that featured SSB voice capability
A carrier, frequency modulated by a 1,000 Hz sinusoid. The modulation index has been adjusted to around 2.4, so the carrier frequency has small amplitude. Several strong sidebands are apparent; in principle an infinite number are produced in FM but the higher-order sidebands are of negligible magnitude.
VSB modulation
Schematic of 4 baud, 8 bit/s data link containing arbitrarily chosen values

In telecommunications and signal processing, baseband is the range of frequencies occupied by a signal that has not been modulated to higher frequencies.

- Baseband

In radio communications, single-sideband modulation (SSB) or single-sideband suppressed-carrier modulation (SSB-SC) is a type of modulation used to transmit information, such as an audio signal, by radio waves.

- Single-sideband modulation

Amplitude modulation produces an output signal the bandwidth of which is twice the maximum frequency of the original baseband signal.

- Single-sideband modulation

The frequency band occupied by the modulation signal is called the baseband, while the higher frequency band occupied by the modulated carrier is called the passband.

- Modulation

Single-sideband modulation (SSB, or SSB-AM)

- Modulation

Steps may be taken to reduce this effect, such as single-sideband modulation.

- Baseband
Categorization for signal modulation based on data and carrier types

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Figure 1: An audio signal (top) may be carried by a carrier signal using AM or FM methods.

Amplitude modulation

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Figure 1: An audio signal (top) may be carried by a carrier signal using AM or FM methods.
One of the crude pre-vacuum tube AM transmitters, a Telefunken arc transmitter from 1906. The carrier wave is generated by 6 electric arcs in the vertical tubes, connected to a tuned circuit. Modulation is done by the large carbon microphone (cone shape) in the antenna lead.
One of the first vacuum tube AM radio transmitters, built by Meissner in 1913 with an early triode tube by Robert von Lieben. He used it in a historic 36 km (24 mi) voice transmission from Berlin to Nauen, Germany. Compare its small size with above transmitter.
Illustration of amplitude modulation
Figure 2: Double-sided spectra of baseband and AM signals.
Figure 3: The spectrogram of an AM voice broadcast shows the two sidebands (green) on either side of the carrier (red) with time proceeding in the vertical direction.
Figure 4: Modulation depth. In the diagram, the unmodulated carrier has an amplitude of 1.
Anode (plate) modulation. A tetrode's plate and screen grid voltage is modulated via an audio transformer. The resistor R1 sets the grid bias; both the input and output are tuned circuits with inductive coupling.

Amplitude modulation (AM) is a modulation technique used in electronic communication, most commonly for transmitting messages with a radio wave.

Single-sideband modulation uses bandpass filters to eliminate one of the sidebands and possibly the carrier signal, which improves the ratio of message power to total transmission power, reduces power handling requirements of line repeaters, and permits better bandwidth utilization of the transmission medium.

The RF bandwidth of an AM transmission (refer to figure 2, but only considering positive frequencies) is twice the bandwidth of the modulating (or "baseband") signal, since the upper and lower sidebands around the carrier frequency each have a bandwidth as wide as the highest modulating frequency.

The passband of an FDM channel carrying digital data, modulated by QPSK quadrature phase-shift keying.

Frequency-division multiplexing

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Technique by which the total bandwidth available in a communication medium is divided into a series of non-overlapping frequency bands, each of which is used to carry a separate signal.

Technique by which the total bandwidth available in a communication medium is divided into a series of non-overlapping frequency bands, each of which is used to carry a separate signal.

The passband of an FDM channel carrying digital data, modulated by QPSK quadrature phase-shift keying.

The multiple separate information (modulation) signals that are sent over an FDM system, such as the video signals of the television channels that are sent over a cable TV system, are called baseband signals.

The carrier signal and the baseband signal are combined in a modulator circuit.

Those cables did not allow such large bandwidths, so only 12 voice channels (double sideband) and later 24 (single sideband) were multiplexed into four wires, one pair for each direction with repeaters every several miles, approximately 10 km. See 12-channel carrier system.