Bat

batsChiropterachiropteranbat wingFlittermouseBat conservationchiropterologistKomolwingAre Bats Blind?
Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera; with their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight.wikipedia
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Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera; with their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight.
The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha (shrews and others).

Flight

flyingflyflies
Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera; with their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight.
Many things can fly, from natural aviators such as birds, bats, and insects, to human inventions like aircraft, including airplanes, helicopters, balloons, and rockets which may carry spacecraft.

Yangochiroptera

Vespertilioniformesmicrobat
But more recent evidence has supported dividing the order into Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, with megabats as members of the former along with several species of microbats.
Yangochiroptera, or Vespertilioniformes, is a suborder of Chiroptera that includes most of the microbat families, except the Rhinopomatidae, Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, and Megadermatidae.

Patagium

uropatagiumpatagiaflight membranes
Bats are more manoeuvrable than birds, flying with their very long spread-out digits covered with a thin membrane or patagium.
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs.

Guano

bat guanowanudroppings
Bat dung has been mined as guano from caves and used as fertiliser.
Guano (via Spanish from wanu) is the accumulated excrement of seabirds and bats.

Animal echolocation

echolocationecholocateecholocating
These were traditionally divided into two suborders: the largely fruit-eating megabats, and the echolocating microbats.
Echolocating animals include some mammals and a few birds; most notably some bat species and odontocetes (toothed whales and dolphins), but also in simpler forms in other groups such as shrews, and two cave dwelling bird groups, the so-called cave swiftlets in the genus Aerodramus (formerly Collocalia) and the unrelated Oilbird Steatornis caripensis.

Yinpterochiroptera

But more recent evidence has supported dividing the order into Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, with megabats as members of the former along with several species of microbats. Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae.
The Yinpterochiroptera, or Pteropodiformes, is a suborder of the Chiroptera, which includes taxa formerly known as megabats and five of the microbat families: Rhinopomatidae, Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, and Megadermatidae.

Wing

wingsaircraft wingWing area
Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera; with their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight.
But in recent centuries the word's meaning has extended to include lift producing appendages of insects, bats, pterosaurs, boomerangs, some sail boats and aircraft, or the inverted airfoil on a race car that generates a downward force to increase traction.

Rabies

rabidhydrophobiamad dog
They are natural reservoirs of many pathogens, such as rabies; and since they are highly mobile, social, and long-lived, they can readily spread disease.
In the Americas, bat bites are the most common source of rabies infections in humans, and less than 5% of cases are from dogs.

Horseshoe bat

RhinolophusRhinolophinaehorseshoe bats
Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae.
Horseshoe bats make up the bat family Rhinolophidae.

Hipposideridae

HipposiderinaehipposideridOld World leaf-nosed bats
Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae.
The Hipposideridae are a family of bats commonly known as the Old World leaf-nosed bats.

Megadermatidae

megadermatidFalse-vampire Batmegadermatids
Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae.
Megadermatidae, or false vampire bats, are a family of bats found from central Africa, eastwards through southern Asia, and into Australia.

Kitti's hog-nosed bat

bumblebee batCraseonycteridaeCraseonycteris
Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae. The smallest bat, and arguably the smallest extant mammal, is Kitti's hog-nosed bat, which is 29 - 34 mm in length, 15 cm across the wings and 2 - 2.6 g in mass. The largest bats are the flying foxes and the giant golden-crowned flying fox, Acerodon jubatus, which can weigh 1.6 kg and have a wingspan of 1.7 m.
Kitti's hog-nosed bat (Craseonycteris thonglongyai), also known as the bumblebee bat, is a vulnerable species of bat and the only extant member of the family Craseonycteridae.

Laurasiatheria

laurasiathereLaurasiatherescows
Modern genetic evidence now places bats in the superorder Laurasiatheria, with its sister taxon as Fereuungulata, which includes carnivorans, pangolins, odd-toed ungulates, even-toed ungulates, and cetaceans.
The clade includes shrews, even-toed ungulates, whales, bats, odd-toed ungulates, pangolins, and carnivorans, among others.

Palaeochiropteryx

Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodonPalaeochiropteryx spiegeli
The extinct bats Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon (48 million years ago) and Hassianycteris kumari (55 million years ago) are the first fossil mammals whose colouration has been discovered: both were reddish-brown. The Eocene bats Icaronycteris (52 million years ago) and Palaeochiropteryx had cranial adaptations suggesting an ability to detect ultrasound.
Palaeochiropteryx is an extinct genus of bat from the Middle Eocene of Europe.

Ultrasound

ultrasonicultrasonicsultrasounds
The Eocene bats Icaronycteris (52 million years ago) and Palaeochiropteryx had cranial adaptations suggesting an ability to detect ultrasound.
Animals such as bats and porpoises use ultrasound for locating prey and obstacles.

Flying primate hypothesis

Flying primates theory
The flying primate hypothesis proposed that, when adaptations to flight are removed, the Megachiroptera are allied to primates by anatomical features not shared with Microchiroptera.
In evolutionary biology, the flying primate hypothesis is that megabats, a subgroup of Chiroptera (also known as flying foxes), form an evolutionary sister group of primates.

Megabat

Pteropodidaefruit batfruit bats
These were traditionally divided into two suborders: the largely fruit-eating megabats, and the echolocating microbats. Two new suborders have been proposed; Yinpterochiroptera includes the Pteropodidae, or megabat family, as well as the families Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Craseonycteridae, Megadermatidae, and Rhinopomatidae.
Megabats constitute the family Pteropodidae of the order Chiroptera (bats).

Free-tailed bat

MolossidaemolossidMops
The Molossidae, or free-tailed bats, are a family of bats within the order Chiroptera.

Colugo

DermopteraCynocephalidaecolugos
Bats were formerly grouped in the superorder Archonta, along with the treeshrews (Scandentia), colugos (Dermoptera), and primates.
As a result, colugos were once considered to be close relatives of bats.

Microbat

Microchiropteramicrobatsmicrochiropteran
These were traditionally divided into two suborders: the largely fruit-eating megabats, and the echolocating microbats.
The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats).

Mormoopidae

Mustached batGhost-faced Bats, Naked-backed Bats and Mustached Bats
The family Mormoopidae contains bats known generally as mustached bats, ghost-faced bats, and naked-backed bats.

Onychonycteris

Onychonycteris finneyibat fossils
The 2003 discovery of an early fossil bat from the 52 million year old Green River Formation, Onychonycteris finneyi, indicates that flight evolved before echolocative abilities.
Onychonycteris is the most primitive of the two oldest known monospecific genera of bat, having lived in the area that is current day Wyoming during the Eocene period, 52.5 million years ago.

Mystacinidae

MystacinaNew Zealand short-tailed batmystacine
Mystacinidae is a family of unusual bats, the New Zealand short-tailed bats.

Vespertilionidae

vesper batvespertilionidVespertilionoidea
Vespertilionidae is a family of microbats, of the order Chiroptera, flying, insect-eating mammals variously described as the common, vesper, or simple nosed bats.