Battle of Agincourt

AgincourtBattle of Azincourtvictory at AgincourtAgincourt campaignAzincourt10/25/1415Agincourt (1415)Agincourt 1415Agincourt Campaign of 1415Agincourt's Dark Secrets
The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt ) was one of the English victories in the Hundred Years' War.wikipedia
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Henry V of England

Henry VKing Henry VHenry of Monmouth
King Henry V of England led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting.
Despite his relatively short reign, Henry's outstanding military successes in the Hundred Years' War against France, most notably in his famous victory at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, made England one of the strongest military powers in Europe.

Hundred Years' War (1415–1453)

Hundred Years' War1415–53 phaseLancastrian War
After several decades of relative peace, the English had renewed their war effort in 1415 amid the failure of negotiations with the French.
Initial English successes, notably at the famous Battle of Agincourt, coupled with divisions among the French ruling class, allowed the English to gain control of large parts of France.

Hundred Years' War

Hundred Years WarHundred Years’ WarHundred Year's War
The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt ) was one of the English victories in the Hundred Years' War.
Several overwhelming English victories in the war—especially at Crécy, Poitiers, Agincourt and Verneuil—raised the prospects of an ultimate English triumph, and persuaded the English to continue pouring money and manpower into the war over many decades.

English longbow

longbowmenlongbowarchers
This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with the English and Welsh archers comprising nearly 80 percent of Henry's army.
English use of longbows was effective against the French during the Hundred Years' War, particularly at the start of the war in the battles of Sluys (1340), Crécy (1346), and Poitiers (1356), and perhaps most famously at the Battle of Agincourt (1415).

Henry V (play)

Henry VKing Henry VHenry the Fifth
It forms the centrepiece of William Shakespeare's play Henry V, written in 1599.
It tells the story of King Henry V of England, focusing on events immediately before and after the Battle of Agincourt (1415) during the Hundred Years' War.

Azincourt

Agincourt
It took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) near Azincourt, in northern France.
The Battle of Agincourt (1415) took place nearby.

Saint Crispin's Day

St Crispin's DaySt. Crispin's DaySaint Crispin's feastday
It took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) near Azincourt, in northern France.
It is a day most famous for the battles that occurred on it, most notably the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

Herald

heraldsherald of armsChief Herald
Immediately after the battle, Henry summoned the heralds of the two armies who had watched the battle together with principal French herald Montjoie, and they settled on the name of the battle as Azincourt, after the nearest fortified place.
During the Battle of Agincourt, the English herald and the French herald, Montjoie, watched the battle together from a nearby hill; both agreed that the English were the victors, and Montjoie provided King Henry V, who thus earned the right to name the battle, with the name of the nearby castle.

Battle of Poitiers

PoitiersBattle of Poitiers (1356)battle
Agincourt is one of England's most celebrated victories and was one of the most important English triumphs in the Hundred Years' War, along with the Battle of Crécy (1346) and Battle of Poitiers (1356). In the ensuing negotiations Henry said that he would give up his claim to the French throne if the French would pay the 1.6 million crowns outstanding from the ransom of John II (who had been captured at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356), and concede English ownership of the lands of Anjou, Brittany, Flanders, Normandy, and Touraine, as well as Aquitaine.
Poitiers was fought ten years after the Battle of Crécy (the first major victory), and about half a century before the third, the Battle of Agincourt (1415).

Thomas Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys

Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron CamoysThomas de CamoysThomas Camoys
The army was organised into three battles or divisions, with the right wing led by Edward, Duke of York, the centre led by the king himself, and the left wing under Baron Thomas Camoys.
1351 – 28 March 1421), KG, of Trotton in Sussex, was an English peer who commanded the left wing of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

Catherine of Valois

CatherineKatherinePrincess Katherine
Henry would marry Catherine, Charles VI's young daughter, and receive a dowry of 2 million crowns.
Henry V went to war with France, and even after the great English victory at Agincourt, plans for the marriage continued.

Thomas Erpingham

Sir Thomas Erpinghamhist
The archers were commanded by Sir Thomas Erpingham, one of Henry's most experienced household knights.
1355 – 27 June 1428) was an English knight who became famous as the commander of King Henry V's longbow wielding archers at the Battle of Agincourt.

Jean Le Fèvre de Saint-Remy

Jean Le Fevre de Saint-RemyJean Le FevreLe Fevre
Two of the most frequently cited accounts come from Burgundian sources, one from Jean Le Fèvre de Saint-Remy who was present at the battle, and the other from Enguerrand de Monstrelet.
Of noble birth, he adopted the profession of arms and with other Burgundians fought in the English ranks at the Battle of Agincourt.

Somme (river)

SommeRiver SommeSomme River
After Henry V marched to the north, the French moved to block them along the River Somme.
Crossing the river also featured prominently in the campaign which led to the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

Jean de Wavrin

Jean de WaurinJehan de WaurinWaurin
The Burgundian chronicler Jean de Wavrin said there were 8,000 men-at-arms, 4,000 archers and 1,500 crossbowmen in the vanguard, with two wings of 600 and 800 mounted men-at-arms, and a main battle comprising "as many knights, esquires and archers as in the vanguard", with the rearguard containing "all of the rest of the men-at-arms".
He belonged to a noble family of Artois, and witnessed the battle of Agincourt from the French side, but later fought on the Anglo-Burgundian side in the later stages of the Hundred Years' War.

Louis, Count of Vendôme

Count of VendômeLouis I de Bourbon-VendômeLouis
The first line was led by Constable d'Albret, Marshal Boucicault, and the Dukes of Orléans and Bourbon, with attached cavalry wings under the Count of Vendôme and Sir Clignet de Brebant.
1421), daughter of Hugh II, Count of Roucy; but he was captured the next year by the English at the Battle of Agincourt, and held by them for some time.

Archer's stake

stakespointed stakes
The English and Welsh archers on the flanks drove pointed wooden stakes, or palings, into the ground at an angle to force cavalry to veer off.
This may have inspired Henry V when he instructed his men to provide themselves with six foot stakes, which were to be planted in front of them at an angle to impale horses of attacking French men-at-arms prior to the Battle of Agincourt, in 1415.

Charles VI of France

Charles VIKing Charles VICharles
Henry would marry Catherine, Charles VI's young daughter, and receive a dowry of 2 million crowns. King Charles VI of France did not command the French army himself, as he suffered from psychotic illnesses and associated mental incapacity.
Henry led an invasion that culminated in the defeat of the French army at the Battle of Agincourt in October.

Edward, 2nd Duke of York

Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of YorkEdward of NorwichEdward, Duke of York
The army was organised into three battles or divisions, with the right wing led by Edward, Duke of York, the centre led by the king himself, and the left wing under Baron Thomas Camoys.
He was slain at the Battle of Agincourt, one of the principal military engagements of the Hundred Years' War against France, in 1415.

Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester

Humphrey of Lancaster, 1st Duke of GloucesterDuke of GloucesterHumphrey of Gloucester
Upon hearing that his youngest brother Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester had been wounded in the groin, Henry took his household guard and stood over his brother, in the front rank of the fighting, until Humphrey could be dragged to safety.
Created Duke of Gloucester in 1414, he participated in Henry V's campaigns during the Hundred Years' War in France: he fought at Agincourt in 1415 and at the conquest of Normandy in 1417–9.

Cavalry

cavalrymencavalrymanhorse
The English and Welsh archers on the flanks drove pointed wooden stakes, or palings, into the ground at an angle to force cavalry to veer off.
Massed English longbowmen triumphed over French cavalry at Crécy, Poitiers and Agincourt, while at Gisors (1188), Bannockburn (1314), and Laupen (1339), foot-soldiers proved they could resist cavalry charges as long as they held their formation.

Duchy of Aquitaine

AquitaineKing of AquitaineKingdom of Aquitaine
In the ensuing negotiations Henry said that he would give up his claim to the French throne if the French would pay the 1.6 million crowns outstanding from the ransom of John II (who had been captured at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356), and concede English ownership of the lands of Anjou, Brittany, Flanders, Normandy, and Touraine, as well as Aquitaine.
He invaded France and emerged victorious at the siege of Harfleur and the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

Harfleur

Harflu
The army of about 12,000 men and up to 20,000 horses besieged the port of Harfleur.
The Battle of Agincourt ended in a decisive English victory with minimal losses - only in the hundreds - and a crushing defeat for the French with losses nearing the tens of thousands.

John V, Duke of Brittany

John VI, Duke of BrittanyJohn VDuke of Brittany
The Duke of Brabant (about 2,000 men), the Duke of Anjou (about 600 men), and the Duke of Brittany (6,000 men, according to Monstrelet), were all marching to join the army.
However, he missed the Battle of Agincourt.

Charles I of Albret

Charles d'AlbretThe Constable of FranceCharles I
Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.
He was also the co-commander of the French army at the Battle of Agincourt where he was killed by the English forces led by King Henry V.