Battle of Barrosa

BarrosaBarossaBarrosa (Battle of)Battle of ''BarrosaChiclanaBattle of la Barrosabattle of BarossaBattle of Chiclana
The Battle of Barrosa (Chiclana, 5 March 1811, also known as the Battle of Chiclana or Battle of Cerro del Puerco) was part of an unsuccessful manoeuvre to break the siege of Cádiz in Spain during the Peninsular War.wikipedia
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Siege of Cádiz

Cádizdefence of Cádizbesieged
The Battle of Barrosa (Chiclana, 5 March 1811, also known as the Battle of Chiclana or Battle of Cerro del Puerco) was part of an unsuccessful manoeuvre to break the siege of Cádiz in Spain during the Peninsular War.
However, despite defeating a detached French force of 15,000–20,000 under Marshal Victor at the Battle of Barrosa, the siege was not lifted.

Manuel Lapeña

La PeñaLa Pena
This force comprised some 8,000 Spanish and 4,000 British troops, with the overall command ceded to the Spanish General Manuel la Peña, a political accommodation since he was widely regarded as incompetent.
He is primarily known for commanding an Anglo–Spanish expedition from Cádiz, with the intention of raising the siege on that city, which led to the Battle of Barrosa.

Chiclana de la Frontera

ChiclanaN
Rather than engaging the French and forcing Victor to weaken his siege by committing more of his troops to the town's defence, la Peña decided that the Allied army should march across country and join the road that ran from Tarifa, through Vejer and Chiclana, to Cádiz.
The Battle of Barrosa, a French defeat by the Anglo-Spanish army, took place 5 miles south of Chiclana on 5 March 1811.

French Imperial Eagle

EaglesImperial Eagleregimental eagle
During the battle, a single British division defeated two French divisions and captured a regimental eagle.
The first French eagle to be captured by the British was taken by the 87th Regiment of Foot at the Battle of Barrosa on 5 March 1811.

Peninsular War

PeninsulaWar of IndependenceSpanish War of Independence
The Battle of Barrosa (Chiclana, 5 March 1811, also known as the Battle of Chiclana or Battle of Cerro del Puerco) was part of an unsuccessful manoeuvre to break the siege of Cádiz in Spain during the Peninsular War.
Marching towards Cádiz on 28 February, this force defeated two French divisions under Victor at Barrosa.

Claude Victor-Perrin, Duc de Belluno

VictorMarshal VictorClaude Perrin Victor
The French, under the command of Marshal Victor, were aware of the Allied movement and redeployed to prepare a trap.
In the same year he was sent to Spain, where he took a prominent part in the Peninsular War (especially against Blake at the Battle of Espinosa, and later at the battles of Talavera, Barrosa and Cádiz), until his appointment in 1812 to a corps command in the invasion of Russia.

Thomas Graham, 1st Baron Lynedoch

Thomas GrahamSir Thomas GrahamGeneral Graham
Victor placed one division on the road to Cádiz, blocking the Allied line of march, while his two remaining divisions fell on the single Anglo-Portuguese rearguard division under the command of Sir Thomas Graham.
The allied troops assembled at Tarifa, in the Straits of Gibraltar, and, moving northward, they arrived, on the morning of 5 March, at the heights of Barrosa, which were on the south of Cádiz and of the lines of the besieging army.

Jean François Leval

LevalJean Francois Leval
Two other divisions, under the commands of Generals François Amable Ruffin and Jean François Leval, were ordered to conceal themselves in the thick Chiclana forest in position to attack the flank of the Allies as they engaged Villatte's division.
Later he transferred to Spain where he fought in numerous actions including Talavera, Ocaña, Barossa, Vitoria, and the Nive.

Samuel Ford Whittingham

Samuel WhittinghamSir Samuel WhittinghamWhittingham
In addition, three Spanish and two King's German Legion (KGL) squadrons of cavalry, under the command of Colonel Samuel Whittingham, were sent to flank this rearguard force on the coast track.
Whittingham served in command of a force of Spanish cavalry and infantry under La Peña at the battle of Barrosa, on 5 March 1811, and kept in check a French corps of cavalry and infantry which attempted to turn the Barossa heights by the seaward side.

King's German Legion

KGL1st King's German Legion Hussars2nd Hussars, King's German Legion
In addition, three Spanish and two King's German Legion (KGL) squadrons of cavalry, under the command of Colonel Samuel Whittingham, were sent to flank this rearguard force on the coast track.
Although the Legion never fought autonomously, its units participated in campaigns in Hanover, Pomerania, Copenhagen and Walcheren, the Peninsular War under General Sir John Moore; and the retreat to Corunna; the Peninsular Campaign under the Duke of Wellington, including the battles of Bussaco, Barrosa, Fuentes de Onoro, Albuera, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Garcia Hernandez, Burgos, Venta del Pozo, Vittoria, San Sebastian, Nivelle, Orthez, Sicily and the eastern parts of Spain, Northern Germany and Göhrde.

Pedro de Alcántara Téllez-Girón

Prince of AnglonaPedro, Prince of AnglonaPedro Téllez-Girón
With the aid of a fresh sortie of Zayas's troops from Cádiz, and reinforced by a brigade of the Prince of Anglona's division, the Spanish drove Villatte's force across the Almanza Creek.
The second son of Pedro Téllez-Girón, 9th Duke of Osuna, the prince fought under the Duke del Parque, leading a Cavalry Division at the Battle of Tamames, the Battle of Alba de Tormes and later, under Manuel la Peña, at the Battle of Barrosa.

Louis Victorin Cassagne

Cassagne
General Louis Victorin Cassagne, Victor's flank commander, informed the marshal of the developing threat.
However, Cassagne started late in the morning and Victor attacked without him and was defeated by Graham's division in the Battle of Barrosa on 5 March.

Playa de la Barrosa

La Barrosa beach
It was the site of the Battle of Barrosa in 1811.

Barossa Valley (wine)

Barossa ValleyBarossa Valley wine regionBarossa Valleys
An officer in the 4th Dragoons, Lieutenant William Light who later became the Surveyor General of South Australia in the 1830s, named a range of hills in the new colony Barossa Range (home to the modern Barossa Valley (wine) region) in memory of the battle.
Light chose the name in memory of the British victory over the French in the Battle of Barrosa, in which he fought in 1811.

87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot

87th Regiment of Foot87th Foot87th
The capture of the eagle—the first to be won in battle by British forces in the Peninsular wars—cost Ensign Keogh of the 87th his life and was finally secured by Sergeant Patrick Masterson (or Masterman, depending on source).
It took part in the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Battle of Barrosa in March 1811.

HMS Barossa

have taken their namesBarrosa
Four Royal Navy ships have taken their names from the battle including HMS Barrosa (1812) launched the year after the battle.
HMS Barossa or HMS Barrosa, named for the Battle of Barossa (1811), has been the name of four ships of the British Royal Navy:

François Amable Ruffin

RuffinFrançois RuffinFrancois Amable Ruffin
Two other divisions, under the commands of Generals François Amable Ruffin and Jean François Leval, were ordered to conceal themselves in the thick Chiclana forest in position to attack the flank of the Allies as they engaged Villatte's division.
He served at Somosierra, Ucles, Medellin and Talavera, before commanding one of Victor's divisions at the Battle of Barrosa on 5 March 1811.

Barossa Range

An officer in the 4th Dragoons, Lieutenant William Light who later became the Surveyor General of South Australia in the 1830s, named a range of hills in the new colony Barossa Range (home to the modern Barossa Valley (wine) region) in memory of the battle.
The Spanish location was the site of the Battle of Barrosa and was won by Light's friend Lord Lynedoch in 1811.

Sharpe's Fury

* Cornwell, Bernard, Sharpe's Fury: Richard Sharpe and the Battle of Barrosa, March 1811, HarperCollins, 2006, ISBN: 978-0-06-053048-8.
It also means Richard Sharpe will meet Colonel Vandal for a second time at the Battle of Barrosa.

1811 in France

1811
5 March - Peninsular War: Battle of Barrosa, tactical defeat for French.

HMS Barrosa (D68)

HMS ''Barrosa'' (D68)HMS BarrosaHMS ''Barrosa
She was named after the Battle of Barrosa, which took place in 1811 between British-Allied forces and France, and which ended in a French defeat.

Battle of Albuera

AlbueraAlbuheraAlbuera (Battle of)
Soult was able to capture the strategically important fortress at Badajoz on the border between Spain and Portugal from the Spanish, but was forced to return to Andalusia following Marshal Victor's defeat in March at the Battle of Barrosa.

Battle honours of the British and Imperial Armies

battle honoursbattle honourBattle honouHonorary Distinction
Badajoz, Badara, Balaclava, Banda, Barrosa, Basutoland 1880–81, Batoche, Beaumont, Bechuanaland 1896–97, Behar, Belleisle, Beni Boo Alli, Bhurtpore, Bladensburg, Blenheim, Bourbon, British East Africa 1896–99, British East Africa 1901, Burma 1885–87, Burmah, Busaco, Bushire, Buxar