Battle of Baton Rouge (1779)

Battle of Baton RougeBaton RougeFort New RichmondBaton Rouge outpostcaptured Baton Rougecaptured the British outpost at Baton Rougefell after a short siegeforcing the surrendernine days' siegetaken Natchez from British troops
The Battle of Baton Rouge was a brief siege during the Anglo-Spanish War that was decided on September 21, 1779.wikipedia
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Spain and the American Revolutionary War

Anglo-Spanish WarAmerican Revolutionary WarSpain
The Battle of Baton Rouge was a brief siege during the Anglo-Spanish War that was decided on September 21, 1779.
On the mainland, the governor of Spanish Louisiana, Count Bernardo de Gálvez, led a series of successful offensives against the British forts in the Mississippi Valley, first the attack and capture of Fort Bute at Manchac and then forcing the surrender of Baton Rouge, Natchez and Mobile in 1779 and 1780.

Bernardo de Gálvez, 1st Viscount of Galveston

Bernardo de GálvezBernardo de GalvezBernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez
Baton Rouge was the second British outpost to fall to Spanish arms during Bernardo de Gálvez's march into British West Florida. When Bernardo de Gálvez, the colonial Governor of Spanish Louisiana received word of this on July 21, he immediately began to plan offensive operations to take British West Florida.
Gálvez carried out a masterful military campaign and defeated the British colonial forces at Fort Bute, Baton Rouge, and Natchez in 1779.

Fort Bute

On August 27, Gálvez set out by land toward Fort Bute, leading a force that consisted of 520 regulars, of whom about two-thirds were recent recruits, 60 militiamen, 80 free blacks and mulattoes, and ten American volunteers headed by Oliver Pollock.
It was one of the three outposts maintained by the British in the lower Mississippi along with Fort Panmure and the Baton Rouge outpost.

Louisiana (New Spain)

Spanish LouisianaLouisianaSpanish
When Bernardo de Gálvez, the colonial Governor of Spanish Louisiana received word of this on July 21, he immediately began to plan offensive operations to take British West Florida.
They participated in three major military campaigns: the Baton Rouge, the Mobile, and the Pensacola, which expelled the British from the Gulf Coast.

British West Florida

West FloridaBritishWestern Florida colony
Baton Rouge was the second British outpost to fall to Spanish arms during Bernardo de Gálvez's march into British West Florida.
Spanish troops under Bernardo de Gálvez advanced and seized Baton Rouge and Mobile.

Capture of Fort Bute

capturing Fort Buteattacked Fort ButeBattle of Fort Bute
At dawn on September 7, this force attacked Fort Bute, a decaying relic of the French and Indian War that was defended by a small force.
Gálvez remained at Fort Bute for six days, giving his men time to rest, before moving on to Baton Rouge, which fell after a short siege on September 21.

Siege of Pensacola

Battle of Pensacolacaptured PensacolaPensacola
He immediately began planning an expedition against Mobile and Pensacola, the remaining British strongholds in West Florida, which would culminate in the capture of Pensacola, the West Florida capital, in 1781.
In September 1779 he gained complete control over the lower Mississippi River by capturing Fort Bute and then shortly thereafter obtaining the surrender of the remaining forces following the Battle of Baton Rouge.

Julien de Lallande Poydras

Julien PoydrasJulien De L. Poydras
Gálvez was promoted to brigadier general for his successful campaign, and his exploits were immortalized in the poetry of Julien Poydras.
Poydras wrote the first poetry ever published in Louisiana in 1779, in honor of Don Bernardo de Gálvez's victory over British troops at the Battle of Baton Rouge, popularly said to have been the only battle of the American Revolutionary War fought outside of the Thirteen Colonies.

Fort New Richmond

Fort San Carlos
Beginning in July 1779, he directed the construction of Fort New Richmond.

Fort Rosalie

Fort PanmureNatchez
Gálvez demanded and was granted terms that included the capitulation of the 80 regular infantry at Fort Panmure (modern Natchez, Mississippi), a well-fortified position that would have been difficult for Gálvez to take militarily.
The fort capitulated to Bernardo de Galvez, the Governor of Spanish Luisiana and Commander of the troops of the Catholic Majesty without any resistance soon after the Battle of Baton Rouge.

Gulf Coast campaign

military campaign along the Gulf Coastconquest of British West FloridaSpanish conquest of West Florida
After nine days' siege, Dickson surrendered.

Siege

besiegedsiege warfarebesiege
The Battle of Baton Rouge was a brief siege during the Anglo-Spanish War that was decided on September 21, 1779.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Baton RougeBaton Rouge, LABâton Rouge
Baton Rouge was the second British outpost to fall to Spanish arms during Bernardo de Gálvez's march into British West Florida.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
Baton Rouge was the second British outpost to fall to Spanish arms during Bernardo de Gálvez's march into British West Florida.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish colonies
Baton Rouge was the second British outpost to fall to Spanish arms during Bernardo de Gálvez's march into British West Florida.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

Declaration of war

declared wardeclare wardeclarations of war
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

Charles III of Spain

Charles IIICarlos IIIKing Carlos III
Spain officially entered the American Revolutionary War on May 8, 1779, with a formal declaration of war by King Charles III.

List of colonial governors of Louisiana

Colonial Governor of LouisianaGovernor of LouisianaFrench Governor of Louisiana
When Bernardo de Gálvez, the colonial Governor of Spanish Louisiana received word of this on July 21, he immediately began to plan offensive operations to take British West Florida.

West Florida

Florida OccidentalColony of West FloridaWestern Florida
When Bernardo de Gálvez, the colonial Governor of Spanish Louisiana received word of this on July 21, he immediately began to plan offensive operations to take British West Florida.

Oliver Pollock

On August 27, Gálvez set out by land toward Fort Bute, leading a force that consisted of 520 regulars, of whom about two-thirds were recent recruits, 60 militiamen, 80 free blacks and mulattoes, and ten American volunteers headed by Oliver Pollock.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
As they marched upriver, the force grew by another 600 men, including Indians and Acadians.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
At dawn on September 7, this force attacked Fort Bute, a decaying relic of the French and Indian War that was defended by a small force.

British Army during the American Revolutionary War

British ArmyBritish forcesBritish Army during the American War of Independence
The troops consisted of British Army regulars from the 16th and 60th Regiments, as well as some artillerymen, and several companies of Germans from the 3rd Waldeck Regiment.