Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
General Kearny's gallant charge
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Map of the battle
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
The death of General Kearny
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Ox Hill Battlefield Park, with monuments to Stevens and Kearny
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's corps of the Army of Northern Virginia attempted to cut off the line of retreat of the Union Army of Virginia following the Second Battle of Bull Run but was attacked by two Union divisions.

- Battle of Chantilly

Pope countered the move and the two forces clashed a final time at the Battle of Chantilly (also known as Ox Hill) on September 1.

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

8 related topics with Alpha

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Union General George B. McClellan and Confederate General Robert E. Lee, the principal commanders of the campaign

Maryland campaign

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The Maryland campaign (or Antietam campaign) occurred September 4–20, 1862, during the American Civil War.

The Maryland campaign (or Antietam campaign) occurred September 4–20, 1862, during the American Civil War.

Union General George B. McClellan and Confederate General Robert E. Lee, the principal commanders of the campaign
Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania (1861-1865)
Southern Virginia, (1861-1865)
Confederate troops marching south on N Market Street, Frederick, Maryland, during the Civil War
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Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg), September 17, 1862
Confederate dead at Antietam
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Maryland campaign, actions September 3–15, 1862
Confederate
Union

Lee then conducted the northern Virginia campaign in which he outmaneuvered and defeated Maj. Gen. John Pope and his Army of Virginia, most significantly at the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas).

On September 3, just two days after the Battle of Chantilly, Lee wrote to President Davis that he had decided to cross into Maryland unless the president objected.

James Longstreet

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One of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse".

One of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse".

Antebellum portrait of Longstreet
Sketch of Longstreet as a Confederate
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
Longstreet circa 1862
A map of the Battle of Fredericksburg
Longstreet at Gettysburg c. undefined 1900
Gettysburg, July 2
Pickett's Charge, July 3
Longstreet's Left Wing assaults, mid-day September 20
Carte de Visite portrait of Longstreet
James Longstreet after the war
James Longstreet after the war
James Longstreet in later life (1896), affecting the sideburns of his opponent at Fredericksburg and Knoxville
Longstreet's grave
Equestrian statue of General Longstreet on his horse Hero in Pitzer Woods at Gettysburg National Military Park
Map of events during the Peninsula campaign to the Battle of Seven Pines Confederate
Union
Longstreet's attack in the Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, shortly before he was wounded Confederate
Union

Longstreet led a devastating counterattack that routed the Union army at Second Bull Run in August.

On September 1, Jackson's corps moved to cut off the Union retreat at the Battle of Chantilly.

Gen. Pope's headquarters during the battle of Cedar Mountain

Army of Virginia

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Organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War.

Organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War.

Gen. Pope's headquarters during the battle of Cedar Mountain

The entire army was soundly defeated at the Second Battle of Bull Run by Jackson, Longstreet, and Lee, and withdrew to the defensive lines of Washington, D.C. On September 12, 1862, the units of the Army of Virginia were merged into the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Virginia was never reconstituted.

Battle of Chantilly – Pope (although fought mostly by Army of the Potomac troops, elements of Pope's force were engaged)

J. E. B. Stuart

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United States Army officer from Virginia who became a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War.

United States Army officer from Virginia who became a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War.

Laurel Hill Farm overview, 2017
A young Stuart
Stonewall Jackson assigned Stuart to cavalry.
CSA Cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart
Stuart's hat, sword and LeMat Revolver (Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, VA)
Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863
Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863
Stuart's ride (shown with a red dotted line) during the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 – July 3, 1863
Bristoe Campaign
The 1864 Overland Campaign, including the Battle of Yellow Tavern
"Dorsey...save your men".
Stuart's gravesite after the war, with temporary marker
Gravesite of Jeb and Flora Stuart, Hollywood Cemetery
M3A1 Stuart tank
Southern Troopers Song, Dedicated to Gen'l. J. E. B. Stuart and his gallant Soldiers, Sheet music, Danville, Virginia, c. 1864

At the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas), Stuart's cavalry followed the massive assault by Longstreet's infantry against Pope's army, protecting its flank with artillery batteries.

Stuart's men harassed the retreating Union columns until the campaign ended at the Battle of Chantilly.

Centreville, Virginia

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Census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The population was 74,230 at the 2020 census.

Census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The population was 74,230 at the 2020 census.

Main street and church guarded by Union soldiers, Centreville, Virginia, May 1862 (#302 Photograph by Civil War photographers George N. Barnard and James F. Gibson)
"Departure from the old Homestead" Pro-union refugees, Centreville, Virginia, 1862 (#306 Photograph by George N. Barnard)
Location of Centreville, Virginia
US 29 in Centreville
Centreville Regional Library

In the American Civil War, several battles were fought nearby including the First Battle of Manassas, the Second Battle of Manassas, and the Battle of Chantilly.

Philip Kearny

Philip Kearny

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United States Army officer, notable for his leadership in the Mexican–American War and American Civil War.

United States Army officer, notable for his leadership in the Mexican–American War and American Civil War.

Philip Kearny
Kearney's funeral at Arlington National Cemetery (April 12, 1912)
Dedicated in 1914, an equestrian statue by Edward Clark Potter marks Kearny's grave in Arlington National Cemetery.
President Woodrow Wilson spoke at the dedication of the statue marking Kearny's grave in Arlington National Cemetery (November 11, 1914).
Statue in Military Park, Newark, New Jersey

He was killed in action in the 1862 Battle of Chantilly.

By the end of August 1862, General Kearny led his division at the disastrous Second Battle of Bull Run, which saw the Union Army routed and nearly destroyed by Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia.

Isaac Ingalls Stevens during the American Civil War

Isaac Stevens

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American military officer and politician who served as governor of the Territory of Washington from 1853 to 1857, and later as its delegate to the United States House of Representatives.

American military officer and politician who served as governor of the Territory of Washington from 1853 to 1857, and later as its delegate to the United States House of Representatives.

Isaac Ingalls Stevens during the American Civil War
Isaac Ingalls Stevens during the American Civil War
Isaac Stevens (c. 1855–1862)
Death of General Isaac Stevens, a lithograph by Alonzo Chappel
A monument (pictured, left) marks the approximate place where Stevens died at the Battle of Chantilly.
Stevens Hall at Washington State University (2017)

He was killed at the Battle of Chantilly, while at the head of his men and carrying the fallen colors of one of his regiments against Confederate positions.

Stevens was transferred with his IX Corps division to Virginia to serve under Major General John Pope in the Northern Virginia Campaign and the Second Battle of Bull Run.

David B. Birney

David B. Birney

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Businessman, lawyer, and a Union general in the American Civil War.

Businessman, lawyer, and a Union general in the American Civil War.

David B. Birney
Birney (center standing), with his II corps commander Hancock and fellow division commanders Barlow and Gibbon during the Wilderness campaign
David B. Birney grave at the Woodlands Cemetery

He fought at the Second Battle of Bull Run in support of Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia, and at the Battle of Chantilly immediately following.