Battle of Chapultepec, Carl Nebel, 1851
Confederate Major General George E. Pickett
Disposition of forces
Thure de Thulstrup's Battle of Gettysburg, showing Pickett's Charge.
Pickett's grave site at Hollywood Cemetery
Plate and place where the remains of six Mexican soldiers were said to be found in Chapultepec in 1947
Battle of Chapultepec by James Walker, 1857
Attack on the Castle Chapultepec
Storming of Chapultepec in Mexico
Attack on Chapultepec, Sept. 13, 1847
Monument to the six Heroic Cadets, with Chapultepec Castle in the background.
Molino del Rey is on the left. "O" depicts a Mexican battery, "P" an American battery, and "R" is Steptoe's battery.

He served as a second lieutenant in the United States Army during the Mexican–American War and is noted for his service in the Battle of Chapultepec in September 1847.

- George Pickett

A number of lower-ranking U.S. Army officers participating in the invasion became generals on both sides of the American Civil War, including Daniel H. Hill, Ulysses Grant, George Pickett, James Longstreet, John C. Pemberton, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, P. G. T. Beauregard, and Robert E. Lee.

- Battle of Chapultepec

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Lee in March 1864

Robert E. Lee

Confederate general who served the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War, during which he was appointed the overall commander of the Confederate States Army.

Confederate general who served the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War, during which he was appointed the overall commander of the Confederate States Army.

Lee in March 1864
Lee at age 31 in 1838, as a Lieutenant of Engineers in the U.S. Army
Robert E. Lee, around age 38, and his son William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, around age 8, c.1845
Robert E. Lee around age 43, when he was a brevet lieutenant-colonel of engineers, c. 1850
Lee in uniform, 1863
Lee mounted on Traveller (September 1866)
Battle of Gettysburg, by Thure de Thulstrup
Lee with son Custis (left) and aide Walter H. Taylor (right) by Brady, April 16, 1865
Lee in 1869 (photo by Levin C. Handy)
General Lee and his Confederate officers in their first meeting since Appomattox, August 1869.
Oath of amnesty submitted by Robert E. Lee in 1865
Robert E. Lee, oil on canvas, Edward Calledon Bruce, 1865. Virginia Historical Society
Robert Edward Lee in art at the Battle of Chancellorsville in a stained glass window of the Washington National Cathedral
Facade view of Arlington House, the Robert E. Lee Memorial — at Arlington National Cemetery, in Virginia, pictured in 2006
Unveiling of the Equestrian Statue of Robert E. Lee, May 29, 1890, Richmond, Virginia
The removal of Lee's statue from a monument in New Orleans
Stained glass of Lee's life in the National Cathedral
Robert E. Lee, National Statuary Hall, Washington, D.C. Edward Virginius Valentine, sculptor, 1909
Robert E Lee, Virginia Monument, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Frederick William Sievers, sculptor, 1917
Robert E. Lee Monument by Mercié, Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia, 1890
Statue of Lee at the Confederate War Memorial, Dallas, 1896
Statue of Lee in Murray, Kentucky
University Chapel on the campus of Washington and Lee University

He also fought at Contreras, Churubusco, and Chapultepec and was wounded at the last.

Easily repulsed, Pickett’s Charge, named after the general whose division participated, resulted in severe Confederate losses.

James Longstreet

One of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse".

One of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse".

Antebellum portrait of Longstreet
Sketch of Longstreet as a Confederate
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
Longstreet circa 1862
A map of the Battle of Fredericksburg
Longstreet at Gettysburg c. undefined 1900
Gettysburg, July 2
Pickett's Charge, July 3
Longstreet's Left Wing assaults, mid-day September 20
Carte de Visite portrait of Longstreet
James Longstreet after the war
James Longstreet after the war
James Longstreet in later life (1896), affecting the sideburns of his opponent at Fredericksburg and Knoxville
Longstreet's grave
Equestrian statue of General Longstreet on his horse Hero in Pitzer Woods at Gettysburg National Military Park

He was wounded in the thigh at the Battle of Chapultepec, and during recovery married his first wife, Louise Garland.

Longstreet was popular with his classmates, however, and befriended a number of men who would become prominent during the Civil War, including George Henry Thomas, William Rosecrans (his West Point roommate), John Pope, Daniel Harvey Hill, Lafayette McLaws, George Pickett, and Ulysses S. Grant.