The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Battle of Cold Harbor by Kurz and Allison, 1888
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
Map of Southeastern Virginia
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Union marches and operations in Central Virginia (1864-65)
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Movements in the Overland Campaign, May 29, and actions May 30, 1864
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
Opposing commanders: Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, USA, at Cold Harbor, photographed by Edgar Guy Fawx in 1864; Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA, photographed by Mathew Brady in 1865
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
The Burnett Inn at Old Cold Harbor (by Timothy H. O'Sullivan, June 4, 1864)
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
Positions of the armies on the afternoon of June 1, 1864
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Cold Harbor, June 1
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Makeshift Confederate breastworks at the extreme left of their line
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Earthworks photographed after the battle
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
7th New York Heavy Artillery (serving as infantry) preparing to leave the trenches and charge the Confederate line, sketched by Alfred Waud
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
"Unburied Dead on Battlefield" by John Reekie; issued as Stero #914 being taken on the 1862 Battlefield of Gaines Mills aka First Cold Harbor April 1865; taken near the Adams Farm where 7th New York artillery was stationed June 1864 see Civil war Talk.
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
Cold Harbor, June 3
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
Union Coehorn mortars in action, drawn by Alfred Waud
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
Overland Campaign, from the Wilderness to crossing the James River
Confederate
Union
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Gen.
<center>Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.
Richmond–Petersburg Theater, fall 1864
Confederate
Union

In the final stage, Lee entrenched his army within besieged Petersburg before finally retreating westward across Virginia.

- Battle of Cold Harbor

This theory was tested at the Battle of Cold Harbor (May 31 – June 12) when Grant's army once again came into contact with Lee's near Mechanicsville.

- Siege of Petersburg
The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.

34 related topics with Alpha

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Portrait by Mathew Brady, c. 1860-1865

P. G. T. Beauregard

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Confederate general officer of Louisiana Creole descent who started the American Civil War by leading the attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.

Confederate general officer of Louisiana Creole descent who started the American Civil War by leading the attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.

Portrait by Mathew Brady, c. 1860-1865
A one-story Creole plantation home
Pierre G. T. Beauregard as a young man, painting by Richard Clague
U.S. Army Major P.G.T. Beauregard
The Battle of Churubusco, August 20, 1847
The Battle of Chapultepec, 13 September, 1847
The 1861 George Peter Alexander Healy portrait of Beauregard in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington
Confederate General P. Gustave Toutant Beauregard
The Battle of Fort Sumter, April 12–13, 1861
The Battle of First Manassas, July 21, 1861
Start of the First Battle of Bull Run
The Battle of Shiloh, April 6–7, 1862
Map of the Battle of Shiloh, afternoon of April 6, 1862, after Beauregard took command
A Confederate ironclad
A Confederate submarine, Dec. 6, 1863
The Battle of Cold Harbor, May 31 – June 12, 1864
Beauregard's defense of Petersburg, Federal assaults of June 15–18
The Battle of Nashville, December 15–16, 1864
Beauregard, later in life
Beauregard revolutionized New Orleans with his cable cars
Beauregard, civil rights advocate
The White League, a Democratic white supremacist paramilitary terrorist organization
The White League barricading a New Orleans road
The first African-American and Republican governor of Louisiana, Pinckney Pinchback of Georgia
The Battle of Liberty Place, September 14, 1874
Caesar Antoine, a Louisiana Creole and Republican lieutenant governor of Louisiana
New Orleans in the 1870's
General P.G.T. Beauregard Equestrian Statue in New Orleans (2008) by sculptor Alexander Doyle
The Battle of Shiloh, April 6–7, 1862
A Creole home in New Orleans, 1870

Gen. Robert Hoke's) to Lee for the Battle of Cold Harbor, but Lee urgently wanted more and took the step of offering Beauregard command of the right wing of the Army of Northern Virginia for his cooperation.

Beauregard continued commanding the defenses of Petersburg in the early days of the siege, but with the loss of the Weldon Railroad in the Battle of Globe Tavern (August 18–21), he was criticized for not attacking more forcefully and he became dissatisfied with the command arrangements under Lee.

Scene of the explosion July 30th 1864
Alfred R. Waud, artist

Battle of the Crater

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Scene of the explosion July 30th 1864
Alfred R. Waud, artist
Contemporary sketch of Col. Pleasants supervising the placement of powder in the mine
National Park Service marker depicting details of the mine
Sketch of the explosion, as seen from the Union line
Battle of the Crater art from the Virginia Tech Bugle 1899 yearbook
Result of the 8,000 lb of powder explosion under the Salient, 1865
The Crater in 2004
Mine entrance in 2006
Interior of Mine entrance in 2015

The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the siege of Petersburg.

It was actually trench warfare, rather than a true siege, as the armies were aligned along a series of fortified positions and trenches more than 20 mi long, extending from the old Cold Harbor battlefield near Richmond to areas south of Petersburg.

Petersburg, Virginia

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Independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Petersburg, Va., from Duns Hill, c. 1880.
Intersection of Sycamore and Bollingbrook
U.S. Engineer Battalion, during the Siege of Petersburg, August 1864
South Side Railroad Depot on Rock Street which served as the office of William Mahone when his Readjustor Party dominated Virginia politics.
The city market that has been preserved and is still used as a market.
The former U.S. Customs House, now serving as the Petersburg City Hall

The 1864–65 Siege of Petersburg, which included the Battle of the Crater and nine months of trench warfare devastated the city.

After his defeat at the Battle of Cold Harbor, Grant remained east of Richmond, crossed the James River and moved south to Petersburg.

George Pickett

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Career United States Army officer who became a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer who became a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

Confederate Major General George E. Pickett
Thure de Thulstrup's Battle of Gettysburg, showing Pickett's Charge.
Pickett's grave site at Hollywood Cemetery

After P. G. T. Beauregard bottled up Benjamin Butler in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, Pickett's division was detached in support of Robert E. Lee's operation in the Overland Campaign, just before the Battle of Cold Harbor, in which Pickett's division occupied the center of the defensive line, a place in which the main Union attack did not occur.

His division participated in the Siege of Petersburg.

Battle flag of the Confederate States Army

First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

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Military unit fighting for the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War.

Military unit fighting for the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War.

Battle flag of the Confederate States Army
Lt. Gen. James Longstreet
I Corps division commander and namesake of Pickett's Charge Major General George Pickett
Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood
Battle of Chickamauga, actions of September 20
Maj. Gen. Charles W. Field

In part or as a whole, the corps fought in nearly all of the major battles in the Eastern Theater, such as Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and the Siege of Petersburg.

VI Corps badge

VI Corps (Union Army)

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Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

VI Corps badge
Monument to commemorate the death of General John Sedgwick, Commander of the Union Army VI Corps in the American Civil War, at Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia, USA.

In the assault at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864, the corps sustained another severe loss, 2,715 of its number killed or wounded.

Accompanying the army to Petersburg, it participated in the preliminary operations incidental to the investment of that stronghold.

Federal earthworks at Bermuda Hundred

Bermuda Hundred campaign

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Series of battles fought at the town of Bermuda Hundred, outside Richmond, Virginia, during May 1864 in the American Civil War.

Series of battles fought at the town of Bermuda Hundred, outside Richmond, Virginia, during May 1864 in the American Civil War.

Federal earthworks at Bermuda Hundred
During the Civil War, the Confederacy was generally able to keep the Union troops west of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, with the main exception being the Bermuda Hundred campaign of 1864.

Although he was able to distract Confederate forces for a brief time, their victories at Proctor's Creek and Ware Bottom Church enabled Beauregard to detach strong reinforcements for Lee's army in time for the fighting at Cold Harbor.

Butler's forces were eventually used in the Siege of Petersburg.

Negro quarters, Army of the James

Army of the James

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Union Army that was composed of units from the Department of Virginia and North Carolina and served along the James River during the final operations of the American Civil War in Virginia.

Union Army that was composed of units from the Department of Virginia and North Carolina and served along the James River during the final operations of the American Civil War in Virginia.

Negro quarters, Army of the James

At the Battle of Cold Harbor the XVIII Corps was sent to act under the Army of the Potomac.

The XVIII Corps also participated in the Siege of Petersburg.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862

Robert Hoke

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Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862
Hoke in later years

Wounded at Chancellorsville, he recovered in time for the defense of Petersburg and Richmond.

His brigade distinguished itself at Cold Harbor (June 1864), acknowledged by Grant as his most costly defeat.

Francis C. Barlow

Francis C. Barlow

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Lawyer, politician, and Union General during the American Civil War.

Lawyer, politician, and Union General during the American Civil War.

Francis C. Barlow
Francis C. Barlow
Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock and generals during the Overland Campaign. Standing, from left to right, are Barlow (wearing his familiar checked shirt), David B. Birney, and John Gibbon.

He fought at the Battle of Cold Harbor and the Siege of Petersburg in the same command.