Settlements of the Conquistadores before the Destruction of the Seven Cities
Synthesis map of the development of the Inca Empire in Chile in the decades before the Spanish arrival.
Anganamón a key Mapuche leader in the Destruction of the Seven Cities. Image from the book Relación del viaje de Fray Diego de Ocaña por el Nuevo Mundo (1599-1605).
Pedro de Valdivia
The Juan Bautista Pastene expedition to southern Chile in 1544.

The Conquest of Chile is a period in Chilean historiography that starts with the arrival of Pedro de Valdivia to Chile in 1541 and ends with the death of Martín García Óñez de Loyola in the Battle of Curalaba in 1598, and the destruction of the Seven Cities in 1598–1604 in the Araucanía region.

- Conquest of Chile

The Destruction of the Seven Cities is in traditional historiography the defining event that marks the end of the Conquest period and the beginning of the proper colonial period.

- Destruction of the Seven Cities

In Chilean historiography, where the event is often called the Disaster of Curalaba (Desastre de Curalaba), the battle marks the end of the Conquest of Chile (la conquista) period in Chile's history, although the fast Spanish expansion in the south had already been halted in the 1550s.

- Battle of Curalaba

The battle contributed to unleash a general Mapuche uprising that resulted in the Destruction of the Seven Cities.

- Battle of Curalaba

The revolt was triggered by the news of the Battle of Curalaba on 23 December 1598, where the vice toqui Pelantaru and his lieutenants, Anganamón and Guaiquimilla, with three hundred men ambushed and killed the Spanish governor Martín García Óñez de Loyola and nearly all his companions.

- Destruction of the Seven Cities
Settlements of the Conquistadores before the Destruction of the Seven Cities

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