Marines planting the US flag
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Map showing the Neolithic Austronesian migrations into the islands of the Indo-Pacific
Seabee welcome sign left for the U.S. Marine Corps on Guam. - U.S. Navy
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamoru in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
Bombardment of Guam on 14 July 1944 before the battle, as seen from the USS New Mexico (BB-40)
Main street of Hagåtña, ca. 1899-1900
U.S. Marines move inland.
U.S. Marines walk through the ruins of Hagåtña, July 1944
Map showing the progress of the Guam campaign
Photograph of Guam from space captured by NASA's now decommissioned Earth observation satellite, Earth Observing-1 (EO-1), on December 30, 2011
U.S. Marines show their appreciation to the Coast Guard.
Guam National Wildlife Refuge beach at Ritidian Point
Three Marine officers of an amphibian tractor battalion who took part in the invasion of Guam (left to right): Major Erwin F. Wann, Major W. W. Butler, and Lt. Colonel Sylvester Stephens
Previously extensively dredged, Tumon Bay is now a marine preserve.
The introduction of the brown tree snake nearly eradicated the native bird population
The Guam Museum in Hagåtña opened in 2016
Youth performance of traditional dance at Micronesia Mall, 2012
Outrigger canoe team at Tumon
Beaches at the tourist center of Tumon
A proportional representation of Guam exports, 2019
Terminal at Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport. The airport hosts a hub of United Airlines, Guam's largest private-sector employer.
Map of U.S. military lands on Guam, 2010
Incumbent governor Lou Leon Guerrero
Michael San Nicolas is the Delegate for Guam's at-large congressional district.
Hagåtña from Fort Santa Agueda
Guam Highway 8 route marker
Construction at the Port of Guam, 2014
The Umatac Outdoor Library, built in 1933, was the first library in southern Guam.

The Battle of Guam (21 July–10 August 1944) was the American recapture of the Japanese-held island of Guam, a U.S. territory in the Mariana Islands captured by the Japanese from the United States in the First Battle of Guam in 1941 during the Pacific campaign of World War II.

- Battle of Guam (1944)

American forces recaptured the island on July 21, 1944, which is commemorated as Liberation Day.

- Guam

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Apra Harbor from the south, with Naval Base Guam on the Orote Peninsula in the foreground

Apra Harbor

Apra Harbor from the south, with Naval Base Guam on the Orote Peninsula in the foreground
USGS map of Apra Harbor, 2000
1802 map. Piti village and the three Spanish batteries are marked. The area marked as "Lagoon" corresponds to current day Inner Apra Harbor. The anchorage marked as "Inner Harbour" is now bisected by the artificial peninsula Drydock Island.
1912 map. Piti and Sumay lie directly on the harbor, with a quarantine station on Cabras Island. The Glass Breakwater, Drydock Island, and Polaris Point have not yet been built.
Southern Apra Harbor in 1941, showing the Pan American Airways fuel piers at Sumay, as well as the lagoon that would be constructed into Inner Apra Harbor after the WWII
The bombarded former Piti Navy Yard and causeway to Cabras Island on July 20, 1944, two days before the U.S. landings.
The harbor in 1945
RMS Caribia crashing into the Glass Breakwater, 1974
Attack submarine USS Salt Lake City and tender USS Frank Cable in Inner Apra Harbor, 2002
Scuba diver on a shipwreck in Apra Harbor, 2017
Benthic cover map for the Sasa Bay Marine Preserve, 2009

Apra Harbor, also called Port Apra, is a deep-water port on the western side of the United States territory of Guam.

Orote Peninsula was the center of Japanese resistance during the U.S. liberation of Guam in 1944 and the area around the harbor saw intense fighting.

Tropical dry forest on Saipan

Mariana Islands

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas; in Chamorro: Manislan Mariånas) are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east.

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas; in Chamorro: Manislan Mariånas) are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east.

Tropical dry forest on Saipan
Geology of the west Pacific in the area of the Mariana Islands. The Mariana Islands are at map-right, east of the Philippine Sea and just west of the Mariana Trench in the ocean floor.
Map showing the Neolithic Austronesian migrations into the islands of the Indo-Pacific
Ruins of Guma Taga on Tinian. The pillars/columns are called latte (pronounced læ'di) stones, a common architectural element of prehistoric structures in the Mariana Islands, upon which elevated buildings were built. Earthquakes had toppled the other latte at this site by the time this photo was taken; an earthquake in 1902 toppled the one seen on the left, and today only the one on the right remains standing.
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
A stamp from the Marianas' late Spanish colonial period, 1898–1899
A 1901 stamp from the German-era Marianas
A U.S. Marine talks a terrified Chamorro woman and her children into abandoning their refuge. Battle of Saipan, 1944.
Chamorro red rice

They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam.

In 1944, the United States captured the Mariana Islands chain from Japan: the Northern Mariana Islands were desired by the U.S. as bombing bases to reach the Japanese mainland, with the invasion of Saipan being launched for that reason in June before the U.S. even moved to recapture Guam; a month later the U.S. recaptured Guam and captured Tinian.

Chamorro people (1915)

Chamorro people

Chamorro people (1915)
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
Reconstruction of how latte stone structures may have appeared
Chamorros fishing, 1819
Village scene depicting caste differences, 1819
Taotaomona are believed to live near Latte stones
Chamorro girls in the 1930s
Group of Chamorros on Guam in the mid-1940s
Chamorros at church in Inarajan, Guam in the mid-1940s
Peter Gumataotao is the first Chamorro two-star flag officer in the United States military
Chamorro red rice
Chamorro performers at the Pacific Islander Festival Association in San Diego
Pop singer Pia Mia is of mixed Chamorro ancestry

The Chamorro people ( also CHamoru) are the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, politically divided between the United States territories of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in Micronesia.

American forces recaptured the island on July 21, 1944; Liberation Day commemorates the victory.

Hågat, Guam

Marines cross a bridge in Agat during the liberation of Guam in 1944.

Hågat (formerly Agat) is a village in the United States territory of Guam.

During the Battle of Guam in 1944, Agat was one of the two landing sites for U.S. Marines.

A Japanese illustration of the main landing on Guam by the 144th Infantry Regiment, South Seas Detachment. Painting by Kohei Ezaki.

Battle of Guam (1941)

A Japanese illustration of the main landing on Guam by the 144th Infantry Regiment, South Seas Detachment. Painting by Kohei Ezaki.
Japanese landings on Guam
Another illustration of the route Japanese forces followed during the invasion
USS Penguin
Captain Haviland of the USS Penguin at the bottom row 2nd from right

The Battle of Guam was an engagement during the Pacific War in World War II, and took place from 8 December to 10 December 1941 on Guam in the Mariana Islands between Japan and the United States.

The American garrison was defeated by Japanese forces on 10 December, which resulted in an occupation until the Second Battle of Guam in 1944.

Orote Peninsula in 2006, looking northwest

Orote Peninsula

Orote Peninsula in 2006, looking northwest
Southern coast of the peninsula along Agat Bay in 2010. Two beaches, Tipalao (also called "Old Wives')(nearer) and Dadi, are visible. Turtle Rock Island lies between.
A 1916-1917 map indicates Sumay was the only major inhabited area of the peninsula
Sumay in the 1930s
Destruction of Sumay after the 1944 Battle of Guam

The Orote Peninsula is a four kilometer-long peninsula jutting from the west coast of the United States territory of Guam.

The U.S. initial U.S. invasion of Guam in July 1944 was designed to attack either sides of the heavily fortified Orote Peninsula, cutting it off from inland support.

A B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron lands at Andersen AFB in 2007.

Andersen Air Force Base

A B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron lands at Andersen AFB in 2007.
Northwest Field at Andersen Air Force Base
About 150 B-52s at Andersen AFB, fall 1972
A B-1B bomber at Andersen
B-2 Spirit and F-15s over Andersen AFB, 2005
A B-52 Stratofortress and other planes flying over Guam in 2009
A B-52 from Barksdale AFB takes off from Andersen in 2007

Andersen Air Force Base (Andersen AFB, AAFB) is a United States Air Force base located primarily within the village of Yigo in the United States territory of Guam.

Established in 1944 after the Liberation of Guam as North Field, it is named for Brigadier General James Roy Andersen (1904–1945).

Barrigada, Guam

The Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport main passenger terminal, which houses the offices of the Guam International Airport Authority
Luis P. Untalan Middle School
Guam Police Department Building

Barrigada (Barigåda) is a village in the United States territory of Guam.

From 2 to 4 August 1944, the United States Marine Corps engaged troops from the Empire of Japan at present-day Barrigada Heights during the battle of Guam, a year before the end of the Second World War.

A joint color guard in the 75th Liberation Day Parade in 2019

Liberation Day (Guam)

A joint color guard in the 75th Liberation Day Parade in 2019
Two U.S. officers plant the American flag on a Guam beach on July 21, 1944
The Liberation Day Queen and Princess at an wreath-laying ceremony commemorating the Anniversary of the Liberation of Guam and the Battle for the Northern Mariana Islands at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington National Cemetery, 2017
Retired Marine Corps Colonel Fraser West, who commanded a company during the 1944 battle, cuts a ribbon in a ceremony to rename Guam Highway 1 to "Marine Corps Drive" at the 2004 Liberation Day
2019 Liberation Day Parade flyover by a B-52 Stratofortress and two F-15 Eagles
A Sailor and a Marine escort the Royal Princess of Piti on her village's float, 2010
The mayor of Asan gives a thumbs up from his village's 2017 float

Liberation Day on the U.S. territory of Guam is an annual commemoration of the invasion by U.S. military forces on July 21, 1944, which ended the Japanese occupation that had begun in 1941.