Battle of Ladysmith

LadysmithLombard´s KopbattleBattle of Lombard's KopLombard's Kopthree unsuccessful actions
The Battle of Ladysmith was one of the early engagements of the Second Boer War.wikipedia
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Ladysmith, KwaZulu-Natal

Ladysmith LadysmithEmnambithi/Ladysmith
A large British force which had concentrated at the garrison town of Ladysmith launched a sortie on 30 October 1899, against Boer armies which were slowly surrounding the town.
Following the Battle of Ladysmith, whilst British forces under Lieutenant General Sir George White regrouped in the town, Boer forces surrounded Ladysmith.

Siege of Ladysmith

Ladysmithdefence of LadysmithRelief of Ladysmith
The Boers did not follow up their advantage by proceeding towards the strategically important port of Durban, and instead began a Siege of Ladysmith, which was relieved after 118 days.
The result was the disastrous Battle of Ladysmith, in which the British were driven back into the town having lost 1,200 men killed, wounded or captured.

Ian Hamilton (British Army officer)

Ian HamiltonSir Ian HamiltonGeneral Sir Ian Hamilton
Other senior British officers considered that White was badly advised by over-eager officers such as Penn-Symons or White's Adjutant General, Colonel Ian Hamilton.
At the Battle of Ladysmith Hamilton continued to lead his brigade sized column, but played no role in the fighting.

John French, 1st Earl of Ypres

John FrenchSir John FrenchFrench
On 21 October, British troops under Colonel Ian Hamilton and White's cavalry commander, Colonel John French, recaptured the station in the Battle of Elandslaagte.
On 30 October his cavalry fought dismounted at Lombard's Kop north-east of Ladysmith; this was the right flank of three unsuccessful actions—the others being Nicholson's Nek and an infantry action at Long Hill in the centre which ended in near-rout—fought by White's troops on "Mournful Monday".

Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Dublin Fusiliersthe Royal Dublin Fusiliers2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers
This attack was to be supported by a column under Colonel Grimwood, consisting of the 1st and 2nd battalions, the King's Royal Rifle Corps, 1st battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment, 1st battalion, the King's Liverpool Regiment and the 2nd battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, which would attack the supposed Boer left flank and capture Long Hill, about 1.5 mi east of Pepworth Hill.
On 30 October the garrison's commander, Sir George Stuart White VC, ordered an attack on Lombard's Kop which the Dublin Fusiliers took part in.

Gloucestershire Regiment

The Gloucestershire RegimentGloucestersGlosters
White also sent a detachment consisting of the 1st battalion, the Royal Irish Fusiliers and half the 1st battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment, with number 10 Mountain Battery (equipped with RML 2.5-inch Mountain Guns) to capture a pass known as Nicholson's Nek which lay about 3 mi to the northwest of Pepworth Hill.
Five days later, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion were part of a small force tasked with seizing Nicholson's Nek, a pass some 6 mi north of Ladysmith, during the Battle of Ladysmith.

5th Dragoon Guards

5th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales's)5th Regiment of Dragoon Guards
The bulk of the mounted troops under Colonel John French (the 5th Lancers, 5th Dragoon Guards, 18th Hussars less a squadron lost at Talana Hill, 19th Hussars, several companies of Mounted infantry, the Natal Carbineers and Imperial Light Horse were stationed in reserve or to Grimwood's right.
The regiment saw action at the Battle of Elandslaagte and the Battle of Lombard's Kop in October 1899 during the Anglo-Boer War.

Relief of Ladysmith

Ladysmith Relief ForceLadysmithrelieve Ladysmith
After several failures, a force under General Redvers Buller, who was later known as "Sir Reverse" and the "Ferryman of the Tugela", broke through the Boer forces defending the Tugela to effect the Relief of Ladysmith on 28 February 1900.
After the ensuing Battle of Ladysmith on 28 October, the Boers succeeding in entrapping White and some 8,000 British regulars in Ladysmith.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The Battle of Ladysmith was one of the early engagements of the Second Boer War.

Colony of Natal

NatalGovernor of the Colony of NatalLieutenant-governor of the Colony of Natal
Most went to Natal, where the vital port of Durban appeared to be within comparatively easy striking distance for the Boer forces.

Durban

Durban, South AfricaPort NatalDurban, KwaZulu-Natal
Most went to Natal, where the vital port of Durban appeared to be within comparatively easy striking distance for the Boer forces.

Garnet Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley

Sir Garnet WolseleyGarnet WolseleyLord Wolseley
The British government was unwilling to order a complete mobilisation, but on the recommendation of the Commander in Chief of the British Army, General Wolseley, they agreed to send 10,000 troops which Wolseley believed could defend Natal if war broke out until reinforcements could arrive by sea.

Presidencies and provinces of British India

IndiaBritish IndiaBritish
The first contingent were some troops returning to Britain from India, under Major General Penn Symons.

Penn Symons

William Penn SymonsBrigadier-General SymonsSymon
The first contingent were some troops returning to Britain from India, under Major General Penn Symons. Penn Symons' position was particularly exposed to danger, being so far north that it was vulnerable to being surrounded, while not far enough north to block the passes through the Drakensberg mountains which the main Boer armies would have to cross to invade Natal.

War Office

War DepartmentBritish War OfficeOld War Office Building
The War Office subsequently dispatched units from garrisons in the Mediterranean and elsewhere, eventually totalling 15,000.

George White (British Army officer)

Sir George WhiteGeorge WhiteGeorge Stuart White
Lieutenant General Sir George White was appointed to command this enlarged force.

Tugela River

TugelaTukhelaThukela
Natal was divided roughly into northern and southern parts by the Tugela River.

Glencoe, KwaZulu-Natal

GlencoeGlencoe Junction
White concentrated the bulk of his force at Ladysmith, about 12 mi north of the Tugela, while a brigade under Penn-Symons was posted even further north at Glencoe and Dundee.

Dundee, KwaZulu-Natal

DundeeDundee, NatalDundee, South Africa
White concentrated the bulk of his force at Ladysmith, about 12 mi north of the Tugela, while a brigade under Penn-Symons was posted even further north at Glencoe and Dundee.

Drakensberg

Drakensberg MountainsDrakensberg escarpmentuKhahlamba
Penn Symons' position was particularly exposed to danger, being so far north that it was vulnerable to being surrounded, while not far enough north to block the passes through the Drakensberg mountains which the main Boer armies would have to cross to invade Natal.

Alfred Milner, 1st Viscount Milner

Lord MilnerAlfred MilnerSir Alfred Milner
Contrary to the advice of several British officials such as Sir Alfred Milner, the High Commissioner for Southern Africa, the independent Boer governments were not over-awed by the despatch of British troops to Natal.

Paul Kruger

KrugerPresident KrugerPresident Paul Kruger
The South African Republic or Transvaal government under President Paul Kruger considered launching an attack in September, but President Steyn of the Orange Free State dissuaded them for several weeks while he tried to act as intermediary.

Martinus Theunis Steyn

SteynPresident SteynM.T. Steyn
The South African Republic or Transvaal government under President Paul Kruger considered launching an attack in September, but President Steyn of the Orange Free State dissuaded them for several weeks while he tried to act as intermediary.

Mauser

Mauser SP66Mauser pistolMauser rifles
All were mounted, and most were armed with Mauser Bolt action rifles.

Bolt action

bolt-actionbolt-action riflestraight-pull
All were mounted, and most were armed with Mauser Bolt action rifles.