The Battle of Lepanto, Paolo Veronese
Oil in canvas, 2nd half of 16th century, probably by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz.
Museo del Prado, Madrid.
The banner of the Holy League, flown by John of Austria on his flagship Real. It is made of blue damask interwoven with gold thread, of a length of 7.3 m and a width of 4.4 m at the hoist. It displays the crucified Christ above the coats of arms of Pius V, of Venice, of Charles V, and of John of Austria. The coats of arms are linked by chains symbolizing the alliance.
Portrait of Don Juan by Jooris van der Straeten
Order of battle of the two fleets, with an allegory of the three powers of the Holy League in the foreground, fresco by Giorgio Vasari (1572, Sala Regia).
Portrait, ca. 1559-60 by Alonso Sánchez Coello.
Depiction of the Ottoman Navy, detail from the painting by Tommaso Dolabella (1632)
Portrait, ca. 1560 by Alonso Sánchez Coello.
One of the Venetian Galleasses at Lepanto (1851 drawing, after a 1570s painting).
John of Austria in armour, by Alonso Sánchez Coello, 1567.
Plan of the Battle (formation of the fleets just before contact)
John of Austria monument in Messina
Fresco in the Vatican's Gallery of Maps
Battle of Lepanto.
The Victors of Lepanto, John of Austria, Marcantonio Colonna and Sebastiano Venier (anonymous oil painting, c. 1575, formerly in Ambras Castle, now Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna)
The Victors of Lepanto (from left: Don Juan de Austria, Marcantonio Colonna, Sebastiano Venier).
Jacopo Ligozzi, The Return of the Knights of Saint Stephen from the Battle of Lepanto (c. 1610, Santo Stefano dei Cavalieri, Pisa)
Coat of arms of John of Austria. Being the illegitimate son of Charles V, in his coat the partitions of the armories of his father were modified. It consisted of a divided shield in which the arms of Castile and León were placed in a cut and not quartered (repeated in four quarters), as usual. To the sinister, departures, Aragon and Aragon-Sicily. On the whole, in escusón, Austria and Duchy of Burgundy. In the coat of arms of John of Austria did not incorporate the blazons of Granada, Franche-Comté, Brabant, Flanders and Tyrol that appeared in the coat of arms of his father. On the outside, surrounding the shield, the necklace of the Order of the Golden Fleece.
Battle of Lepanto by Martin Rota, 1572 print, Venice
Engraving of John of Austria.
Felipe II offers Prince Fernando to Victory by Titian, c. 1572–1575, Museo del Prado, Madrid
The Joyous Entry of John of Austria into Brussels, 1 May 1577. Print from 'The Wars of Nassau' by W. Baudartius, Amsterdam 1616.
Monument to John of Austria in Messina
Tomb of John of Austria by Giuseppe Galeotti (according to a design by Ponzano) in the fifth chamber of the Pantheon in the Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain
The Battle of Lepanto by Andrea Vicentino (c. 1600, Doge's Palace, Venice)
The Battle of Lepanto by Tommaso Dolabella (c. 1625–1630, Wawel Castle, Cracow)
The Battle of Lepanto by Andries van Eertvelt (1640)
The Battle of Lepanto by Juan Luna (1887, Spanish Senate, Madrid)
The Battle of Lepanto by Tintoretto
The Battle of Lepanto by anonymous
The Battle of Lepanto by Giorgio Vasari

He became a military leader in the service of his half-brother, King Philip II of Spain, and is best known for his role as the admiral of the Holy Alliance fleet at the Battle of Lepanto.

- John of Austria

There, in the Basilica of Santa Chiara, it was solemnly consigned to John of Austria, who had been named the leader of the coalition after long discussions among the allies.

- Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto, Paolo Veronese

15 related topics

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Portrait by Sofonisba Anguissola (1573)

Philip II of Spain

King of Spain from 1556, King of Portugal from 1580, and King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until his death in 1598.

King of Spain from 1556, King of Portugal from 1580, and King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until his death in 1598.

Portrait by Sofonisba Anguissola (1573)
The Baptism of Philip II in Valladolid, Castile. Historical ceiling preserved in Palacio de Pimentel (Valladolid).
Portrait by Titian, c. 1550.
Philip, in the prime of his life, by Anthonis Mor
Philip II wearing the order of the garter by Jooris van der Straeten, c. 1554
Portrait of Philip II on 1/5 Philipsdaalder, struck 1566, Guelders, Low Countries
Personal guidon of Philip II
A marble bust of Philip II of Spain by Pompeo Leoni, son of Leone Leoni, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Titian; after the Battle of Lepanto in 1571, Philip offers his short-lived heir Fernando to Glory in this allegory
Standard of the tercios morados of the Spanish army under Philip II
Philip II berating William of Orange, by Cornelis Kruseman
Reward letter of Philip II to the family of Balthasar Gerards, assassin of William the Silent, 1590
Anthony I of Portugal
Spanish Empire of Philip II, III and IV including all charted and claimed territories, maritime claims (mare clausum) and other features.
Titian portrait of Philip as prince (1551), aged about twenty-four dressed in a lavishly decorated set of armour.
Irish groat with Philip and Mary's initials and portraits.
Philip and Mary I of England, 1558
Philip's European and North African dominions in 1581
Philip's dominions in 1598
Statue of Philip II at the Sabatini Gardens in Madrid (F. Castro, 1753).
Cannon with arms of Philip II as King of Spain and jure uxoris King of England and France.
Portrait of Philip II as King of Portugal by Sánchez Coello, circa 1580
Princess Maria of Portugal
Queen Mary Tudor of England
Queen Elisabeth of Valois
Queen Anna of Austria by Sofonisba Anguissola
thumb|Cenotaph of Philip and three of his four wives at El Escorial.
thumb|Philip and his niece Anna banqueting with family and courtiers, by Alonso Sánchez Coello

Earlier, however, after several setbacks in his reign and especially that of his father, Philip did achieve a decisive victory against the Turks at Lepanto in 1571, with the allied fleet of the Holy League, which he had put under the command of his illegitimate brother, John of Austria.

The banner of the Holy League, flown by John of Austria on his flagship Real. It is made of blue damask interwoven with gold thread, of a length of 7.3 m and a width of 4.4 m at the hoist. It displays the crucified Christ above the coats of arms of Pius V, of Venice, of Charles V, and of John of Austria. The coats of arms are linked by chains symbolizing the alliance.
The banner was given to Toledo Cathedral in 1616 by Philip III of Spain. It was moved to the Museum of Santa Cruz in 1961.

Holy League (1571)

These Christian states were to have a force of 200 galleys, 100 other ships, 50,000 infantry, 4,500 cavalry and adequate artillery ready by 1 April each year.

These Christian states were to have a force of 200 galleys, 100 other ships, 50,000 infantry, 4,500 cavalry and adequate artillery ready by 1 April each year.

The banner of the Holy League, flown by John of Austria on his flagship Real. It is made of blue damask interwoven with gold thread, of a length of 7.3 m and a width of 4.4 m at the hoist. It displays the crucified Christ above the coats of arms of Pius V, of Venice, of Charles V, and of John of Austria. The coats of arms are linked by chains symbolizing the alliance.
The banner was given to Toledo Cathedral in 1616 by Philip III of Spain. It was moved to the Museum of Santa Cruz in 1961.
The coats of arms of the leaders of the Holy League (Habsburg Spain, Pope Pius V, Republic of Venice, John of Austria) as depicted in the printed order of battle published on 14 November 1571 by Antonio Lafreri in Rome.

John of Austria, illegitimate half-brother of King Philip II of Spain, was designated supreme commander.

On 7 October 1571, the League won a decisive victory over the Ottoman fleet at the Battle of Lepanto in the Gulf of Patras.

Republic of Venice

Sovereign state and maritime republic in parts of present-day Italy (mainly northeastern Italy) which existed for 1100 years from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, it incorporated numerous overseas possessions in modern Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Greece, Albania and Cyprus.

Sovereign state and maritime republic in parts of present-day Italy (mainly northeastern Italy) which existed for 1100 years from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, it incorporated numerous overseas possessions in modern Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Greece, Albania and Cyprus.

The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Doge of Venice, illustrated in the manuscript Théâtre de tous les peuples et nations de la terre avec leurs habits et ornemens divers, tant anciens que modernes, diligemment depeints au naturel. Painted by Lucas d'Heere in the 2nd half of the 16th century. Preserved by the Ghent University Library.
The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Venetia c 600 AD
The Venetia c 840 AD
Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000
Procession in St Mark's Square by Gentile Bellini in 1496
Leonardo Loredan, Doge of Venice during the War of the League of Cambrai.
The Venetian fort of Palamidi in Nafplion, Greece, one of many forts that secured Venetian trade routes in the Eastern Mediterranean.
Greater coat of arms of the Republic, with its various possessions and claims, in the aftermath of the Morean War
The Republic of Venice around 1700
Drawing of the Doge's Palace, late 14th century
The governmental structure of the Venetian Republic
The hearing given by the Doge in the Sala del Collegio in Doge's Palace by Francesco Guardi, 1775–80
The Flag of Veneto.
Siege of Tyre (1124) in the Holy Land
Siege of Constantinople (1203)
Voyage of Marco Polo into the Far East during the Pax Mongolica
The Piraeus Lion in Venice, in front of the Venetian Arsenal
Relief of the Venetian Lion on the Landward Gate in Zara (Zadar), capital of the Venetian Dalmatia
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Parenzo (Poreč)
Vicenza, Piazza dei Signori.
Udine, Piazza Libertà.
Piazza delle Erbe, Verona
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Cattaro (Kotor)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Candia (Heraklion)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Frangokastello, Crete
Venetian blazon with the Lion of Saint Mark, as frequently found on the New Fortress walls, Corfu.

Two months later, the naval forces of the Holy League, composed mainly of Venetian, Spanish, and papal ships under the command of Don John of Austria, defeated the Turkish fleet at the Battle of Lepanto.

Occhiali

Italian farmer, then Ottoman privateer and admiral, who later became beylerbey of the Regency of Algiers, and finally Grand Admiral (Kapudan Pasha) of the Ottoman fleet in the 16th century.

Italian farmer, then Ottoman privateer and admiral, who later became beylerbey of the Regency of Algiers, and finally Grand Admiral (Kapudan Pasha) of the Ottoman fleet in the 16th century.

Uluç Ali Reis bust at the Mersin Naval Museum.
Ottoman troops (about 5,000 janissaries) led by Uluç Ali, then Pasha of Algiers, marching on Tunis in 1569.
Statue of Uluç Ali Reis in his hometown of Le Castella, Italy.

On 7 October 1571, Uluj Ali commanded the left flank of Ali Pasha's fleet in the Battle of Lepanto.

In that same year, the regency of Algiers was transferred to Arab Ahmed, and Don Juan of Austria, the victor of Lepanto, recaptured Tunis.

The Battle of Lepanto

Ottoman–Venetian War (1570–1573)

Fought between 1570 and 1573.

Fought between 1570 and 1573.

The Battle of Lepanto
A Divan decision addressing to the qadi of Uskudar about rations before the outbreak of war.
Map of the siege of Nicosia, by Giovanni Camoccio, 1574
Marco Antonio Bragadin, Venetian commander of Famagusta, was gruesomely killed after the Ottomans took the city.
The Battle of Lepanto 1571, engraved by Martin Rota.

Two months later, at the Battle of Lepanto, the united Christian fleet destroyed the Ottoman fleet, but was unable to take advantage of this victory.

According to the terms of the new alliance, during the late summer, the Christian fleet assembled at Messina, under the command of Don John of Austria, who arrived on 23 August.

Tunis

Capital and largest city of Tunisia.

Capital and largest city of Tunisia.

Tunis as viewed from space
Roofs of the medina
Ruins of the Baths of Antoninus in Carthage.
Courtyard of Zaytuna Mosque, founded in the late 7th century by the Umayyad dynasty
Historic map of Tunis by Piri Reis. The Walters Art Museum.
Entry of Charles V into Tunis in 1535
Mustapha Khaznadar, Prime Minister of Tunis from 1837 to 1873. and one of the most influential persons in modern Tunisian history.
View of Tunis c. 1890–1900. Zaytuna Mosque is slightly right of center.
Urban evolution between 1890 and 1914
Bab Suika-Suker Square in Tunis, ca. 1899
Extension of the city in the 1950s with the district of El Menzah
Kasbah Square comprising the finance ministry and the prime ministry of Tunisia
City Hall
Souad Abderrahim, mayor of Tunis since 2018.
Elderly man in Tunis
Muslims in Tunis attend the mosque in 1899.
A souk shopkeeper
Avenue Mohamed V in the financial district
Tunisia Mall
Statue of Ibn Khaldoun in Independence Square
View of the building of "Tour de la nation" in avenue Mohamed-V
Tunis at Night
Avenue Habib-Bourguiba
Court of Dar Ben Abdallah
Court of Dar Soulaimania, once the boarding lodge of University of Ez-Zitouna.
Souk En Nhas with items of copper
Walls and gates of the city in 1888
Cathedral of St. Vincent de Paul
St. Louis Cathedral on the Byrsa hill at Carthage
Zaytuna Mosque
Bab el Bhar
Bardo National Museum
Tunis Municipal Theatre
Tunis Old Tribunal
Faculty of the Human and Social Sciences
Higher School of Communication of Tunis
National Library of Tunisia
Tunis bus
Tunis Light Metro
Tunis south surb train
Tunis-Carthage International Airport
Radès Bridge
Tunis road
Oussama Mellouli, gold medallist at the Beijing Summer Olympics and at the London Summer Olympics
Ibn Khaldoun-Kassus
Stade Olympique de Radès
Stade El Menzah
Palais des sports d'El Menzah
Salle Omnisport de Radès

However, following the Battle of Lepanto in 1571, the Spanish under John of Austria succeeded in retaking the city and re-establishing the Hafsid sovereign in October 1573.

Portrait by Titian, probably with Lambert Sustris, 1548

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

Holy Roman Emperor and Archduke of Austria from 1519 to 1556, King of Spain (Castile and Aragon) from 1516 to 1556, and Lord of the Netherlands as titular Duke of Burgundy from 1506 to 1555.

Holy Roman Emperor and Archduke of Austria from 1519 to 1556, King of Spain (Castile and Aragon) from 1516 to 1556, and Lord of the Netherlands as titular Duke of Burgundy from 1506 to 1555.

Portrait by Titian, probably with Lambert Sustris, 1548
The entrance gate to the Prinsenhof (Dutch; literally "Princes' court") in Ghent, where Charles was born.
A painting by Bernhard Strigel representing the extended Habsburg family, with a young Charles in the middle.
A portrait by Bernard van Orley, 1519. The insignia of the Order of the Golden Fleece are prominently displayed.
A Portrait of Charles V with a Dog by Jakob Seisenegger, 1532
The Dominions of the Habsburgs at the time of the abdication of Charles V in 1556
The Palace of Coudenberg in Brussels from a 17th-century painting, before it burnt down in 1731. Brussels served as the main seat of the Imperial court of Charles V in the Low Countries.
The city of Toledo served as the main seat of the Imperial court of Charles V in Castile.
The exterior of the Palace of Charles V in Granada was built upon his wedding to Isabel of Portugal in 1526.
Pope Clement VII and Emperor Charles V on horseback under a canopy, by Jacopo Ligozzi, c. undefined 1580. It depicts the entry of the Pope and the Emperor into Bologna in 1530, when Charles was crowned as Holy Roman Emperor by Clement VII.
A panorama of Augsburg, the main German seat of the Imperial court and the location of many of the Imperial Diets presided over by Charles V. A hand-coloured woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicle.
Francis I and Charles V made peace at the Truce of Nice in 1538. Francis actually refused to meet Charles in person, and the treaty was signed in separate rooms.
Charles V in the 1550s, after Titian
Summons for Martin Luther to appear at the Diet of Worms, signed by Charles V. The text on the left was on the reverse side.
16th-century perception of German soldiers during Charles's reign (1525) portrayed in the manuscript "Théâtre de tous les peuples et nations de la terre avec leurs habits et ornemens divers, tant anciens que modernes, diligemment depeints au naturel". Painted by Lucas d'Heere in the second half of the 16th century. Preserved in the Ghent University Library.
Isabella of Portugal, Charles's wife. Portrait by Titian, 1548
Emperor Charles V and Empress Isabella. Peter Paul Rubens after Titian, 17th century
The bronze effigies of Charles and Isabella at the Basilica in El Escorial.
Titian's La Gloria, one of the several paintings commissioned by Charles V in memory of his wife Isabella
The children of Phillip and Joanna
In Allegory on the abdication of Emperor Charles V in Brussels, Frans Francken the Younger depicts Charles V in the allegorical act of dividing the entire world between Philip II of Spain and Emperor Ferdinand I.
Habsburg dominions in the centuries following their partition by Charles V.
Deathbed of the emperor at the Monastery of Yuste, Cáceres
A miniature representing Charles V enthroned over his enemies (from left): Suleiman, Pope Clement VII, Francis I, the Duke of Cleves, the Duke of Saxony and the Landgrave of Hesse. In reality, Charles was never able to completely defeat them.
Equestrian armour of Emperor Charles V. Piece drawn from the collection of the Royal Armoury of Madrid
Statue of Charles V in Granada, Spain
Escutcheon of Charles V, watercolour, John Singer Sargent, 1912. Metropolitan Museum of Art
{{Center|Margaret of Parma}}
{{Center|John of Austria}}
Coat of arms of King Charles I of Spain before becoming emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.
Coat of Arms of Charles I of Spain, Charles V as Holy Roman Emperor.
Arms of Charles, Infante of Spain, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, KG at the time of his installation as a knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter.
Variant of the Royal Bend of Castile used by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

Decisive naval victory eluded Charles; it would not be achieved until after his death, at the Battle of Lepanto in 1571.

John of Austria (1547–1578), son of Barbara Blomberg, victor of the Battle of Lepanto

Portrait of Luis de Requesens, by Francisco Jover y Casanova (Prado museum)

Luis de Requesens y Zúñiga

Spanish general, sailor, diplomat and politician.

Spanish general, sailor, diplomat and politician.

Portrait of Luis de Requesens, by Francisco Jover y Casanova (Prado museum)
Luis de Requesens y Zúñiga

In 1568 he was appointed lieutenant-general to John of Austria during the suppression of the Morisco Revolt in the Alpujarras, and he also accompanied John during the Lepanto campaign, his function being to watch and control his nominal commander-in-chief, whose excitable temperament was distrusted by the king.

A model of a Maltese design typical of the 16th century, the last great era of the war galley in the Mediterranean Sea

Galley

Type of ship that is propelled mainly by oars.

Type of ship that is propelled mainly by oars.

A model of a Maltese design typical of the 16th century, the last great era of the war galley in the Mediterranean Sea
The English-built Charles Galley, a "galley frigate" built in the 1670s. It was not a "true" galley, but the term still became part of its name due to its oars.
Watercolor of United States ships at the Battle of Valcour Island, depicting several "row galleys"; similar function, but based on very different designs from Mediterranean galleys.
Assyrian warship, a bireme with pointed bow. 700 BC
Dionysus riding on a small galley-like craft in a painting from the Dionysus cup by Exekias, from c. 530 BC
A reconstruction of an ancient Greek galley squadron based on images of modern replica Olympias
A Roman naval bireme in a relief from the Temple of Fortuna Primigenia in Praeneste, (Palastrina) built c. 120 BC, (in the Museo Pio-Clementino).
Odysseus and the Sirens, Ulixes mosaic at the Bardo National Museum in Tunis, Tunisia, 2nd century AD
Two compact liburnians used by the Romans in the campaigns against the Dacians in the early 2nd century AD; relief from Trajan's Column, c. 113 AD.
Triumph of Poseidon and Amphitrite: the couple in procession, mosaic detail from Cirta, Roman Africa, ca. 315–325 AD, (in the Louvre)
Venetian great galley with three sails taking pilgrims to Jerusalem (Conrad Grünenberg 1486/7).
A 3D model of the basic hull structure of a Venetian "galley of Flanders", a large trading vessel of the 15th century. The reconstruction by archaeologist Courtney Higgins is based on measurements given in contemporary ship treatises.
Illustration of a 15th-century trade galley from a manuscript by Michael of Rhodes (1401–1445) written in 1434.
Painting of the Battle of Haarlemmermeer of 1573 by Hendrick Cornelisz Vroom. Note the use of small sailing vessels and galleys on both sides.
Ottoman galleys in battle with raiding boats in the Black Sea; Sloane 3584 manuscript, c. 1636
The Battle of Lepanto in 1571, naval engagement between allied Christian forces and the Ottoman Turks.
French ship under attack by Barbary pirates, c. 1615
Dutch ships ramming Spanish galleys in the Battle of the Narrow Seas, October 1602.
A painting of the Battle of Grengam in 1720 by Ferdinand Perrot (1808–41) showing a large Russian galley engaging Swedish frigates at close range. Note the crowded fighting platform (rambade) in the bow.
A galley from Banten, 1598. The galley has balai (raised fighting platform). Four cetbang can be seen.
Illustration of an Egyptian rowed ship of c. 1250 BC. Due to a lack of a proper keel, the vessel has a truss, a thick cable along its length, to prevent it from losing its shape.
A schematic view of the mortise and tenon technique for shipbuilding that dominated the Mediterranean until the 7th century AD.
The stern of the modern trireme replica Olympias with twin side rudders
The Athlit ram, a preserved original warship ram from around 530–270 BC. It weighs nearly half a tonne and was probably fitted to a "five" or a "four".
14th-century painting of a light galley, from an icon now at the Byzantine and Christian Museum at Athens
A Venetian galea sottile from the late 15th century from Vittore Carpaccio's Return of the Ambassadors in the series Legend of Saint Ursula (1497–1498). Note the oars arranged in groups of three according to the alla sensile rowing method.
The ubiquitous bow fighting platform (rambade) of early modern galleys. This model is of a 1715 Swedish galley, somewhat smaller than the standard Mediterranean war galley, but still based on the same design.
Modern reconstruction of a cross-section of an ancient Greek trireme, showing the three levels of rowers.
Model of a Venetian three-banked galley rowed alla sensile, with three rowers sharing a bench but handling one oar each
An illustration from 1643 showing the layout of rowing benches as well and placement of rowers on a galley with 16 pairs of oars. It also shows a rower at the top of the stroke using the standing rowing technique typical of a scaloccio rowing.
The ram bow of the trireme Olympias, a modern full-scale reconstruction of a classical Greek trireme.
The Byzantine fleet repels the Rus' attack on Constantinople in 941. The Byzantine dromons are rolling over the Rus' vessels and smashing their oars with their spurs.
Byzantine ship attacking with Greek fire. Madrid Skylitzes manuscript, 11th century.
Battle between Venetian and Holy Roman fleets; detail of fresco by Spinello Aretino 1407–1408.
Contemporary depiction of the Battle of Lepanto in 1571 that shows the strict formations of the opposing fleets. Fresco in the Gallery of Maps in Vatican Museum.
The Galley Subtle, one of the very few Mediterranean-style galleys employed by the English. This illustration is from the Anthony Roll (c. 1546) and was intended as its centerpiece.
Gouache of a late 17th-century French royal galley. The vessel is richly decorated with red and blue damask, brocade, and velvet for the stern canopy and flags, and carved gilded ornaments on railings, outrigger, and hull.
La Liberté, a full-scale replica of a 17th-century galley in Switzerland, though without any rowing benches

The zenith of galley usage in warfare came in the late 16th century with battles like that at Lepanto in 1571, one of the largest naval battles ever fought.

A 1971 reconstruction of the Real, the flagship of John of Austria in the Battle of Lepanto (1571), is in the Museu Marítim in Barcelona. The ship was 60 m long and 6.2 m wide, had a draught of 2.1 m, weighing 239 tons empty, was propelled by 290 rowers, and carried about 400 crew and fighting soldiers at Lepanto. She was substantially larger than the typical galleys of her time.

Portrait of Giovanni Andrea Doria ca. 1594

Giovanni Andrea Doria

Italian admiral from Genoa.

Italian admiral from Genoa.

Portrait of Giovanni Andrea Doria ca. 1594
Giovanni Andrea Doria

He also participated in the Battle of Lepanto in 1571, commanding the right wing of the Christian coalition force known as the Holy League.

Using the momentum from the Battle of Lepanto, Don John and Doria would go on to capture Tunis in 1573.