Battle of Mons

Monsretreat from MonsBattle ofBritish Expeditionary Forcefighting at Monsfirst British battle of the war at Monsfirst time in battleHarmingniesin an engagement outside MonsMons Road
The Battle of Mons was the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in the First World War.wikipedia
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14th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

14th Infantry Brigade14th Brigade14th
On the extreme left of the British line, the 14th and 15th Brigades of the 5th Division were threatened by a German outflanking move and were forced to call for help from the cavalry.

2nd Cavalry Brigade (United Kingdom)

2nd Cavalry BrigadeUnion Brigade2nd
The 2nd Cavalry Brigade, along with the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery (RFA) and L Battery RHA, were sent to their aid.

Royal Field Artillery

RFAR.F.A.Field Artillery
The 2nd Cavalry Brigade, along with the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery (RFA) and L Battery RHA, were sent to their aid.

L (Néry) Battery Royal Horse Artillery

L BatteryL Battery, RHAL (Néry) Battery
The 2nd Cavalry Brigade, along with the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery (RFA) and L Battery RHA, were sent to their aid.

Bavay

BavaiBagacumBavacum (Bavay)
IX Corps was to advance to the east of Bavay, III Corps was to advance to the west of the village, IV Corps was to advance towards Warnies-le-Grand 10 km further to the west and the II Cavalry Corps was to head towards Denain, to cut off the British retreat.

Quiévrain

QuievrainAudregniesQuiéverain
Repairs took until 9:00 a.m. and the 8th Division did not reach Quiévrain until noon; the 7th Division reached the railway at Thuin during the morning and then took Élouges late in the afternoon.

Sortie

sortiessallysallies
British reconnaissance flights had begun on 19 August with two sorties and two more on 20 August, which reported no sign of German troops.

Ninove

DenderwindekeOkegemAppelterre-Eichem
Twelve reconnaissance sorties were flown on 22 August and reported many German troops closing in on the BEF, especially troops on the Brussels–Ninove road, which indicated an enveloping manoeuvre.

Geraardsbergen

GrammontOverboelareZandbergen
By the evening Sir John French was able to discuss with his commanders the German dispositions near the BEF which had been provided by aircraft observation, the strength of the German forces, that the Sambre had been crossed and that an encircling move by the Germans from Geraardsbergen was possible.

Landrecies

LandrecyLandrechies
Outnumbered by the German 1st Army and with the French Fifth Army also falling back, the BEF had no choice but to continue to retire – I Corps retreating to Landrecies and II Corps to Le Cateau.

Crimean War

CrimeaCrimea WarCrimean
The battle was an important moral victory for the British; as their first battle on the continent since the Crimean War, it was a matter of great uncertainty as to how they would perform.

John Keegan

Keegan, JohnSir John KeeganJohn Desmond Patrick Keegan
John Keegan estimated German losses to have been c.

Terence Zuber

Zuber, Terence
Using German regimental histories, Terence Zuber gave "no more than 2,000" German casualties.

Battle of Agincourt

AgincourtBattle of Azincourtvictory at Agincourt
In British historical writing, it has a reputation as an unlikely victory against overwhelming odds, similar to the English victory at the Battle of Agincourt.

Longbow

longbowmenlong bowlongbows
Mons gained a myth, a miraculous tale that the Angels of Mons—angelic warriors sometimes described as phantom longbowmen from Agincourt—had saved the British Army by halting the German troops.

1914 Star

Mons Star1914 star and bar1914 Star Medal
Soldiers of the BEF who fought at Mons became eligible for a campaign medal, the 1914 Star, often colloquially called the Mons Star, honouring troops who had fought in Belgium or France 5 August – 22 November 1914.

Wilhelm II, German Emperor

Wilhelm IIKaiser Wilhelm IIKaiser Wilhelm
On 19 August 1914, Kaiser Wilhelm allegedly issued an Order of the Day which read in part: ". . . my soldiers to exterminate first the treacherous English; walk over Field Marshal French's contemptible little Army."

Mentioned in dispatches

Mentioned in DespatchesMention in DespatchesMentions in Despatches
On 19 August 1914, Kaiser Wilhelm allegedly issued an Order of the Day which read in part: ". . . my soldiers to exterminate first the treacherous English; walk over Field Marshal French's contemptible little Army."

Tommy Atkins

TommyTommiesBritish Tommy
This led to the British "Tommies" of the BEF proudly labelling themselves "The Old Contemptibles".

Falsehood in War-Time

Falsehood in War-time, Containing an Assortment of Lies Circulated Throughout the Nations During the Great War
According to the controversial book Falsehood in War-Time, an investigation conducted by General Frederick Maurice traced the origins of the Order to the British GHQ, where it had been concocted for propaganda purposes.

Headquarters

headquarteredheadquarterHQ
According to the controversial book Falsehood in War-Time, an investigation conducted by General Frederick Maurice traced the origins of the Order to the British GHQ, where it had been concocted for propaganda purposes.

Canadian Army

CanadianArmyCanadian Forces Land Force Command
More British, Canadian and German graves were moved to the cemetery from other burial grounds and more than 500 soldiers were eventually buried in St. Symphorien, of which over 60 were unidentified.

Royal Irish Regiment (1684–1922)

Royal Irish Regiment18th Regiment of FootThe Royal Irish Regiment
Greatly outnumbered, both battalions suffered many casualties but with reinforcements from the Royal Irish Regiment, from the divisional reserve and support from the divisional artillery, they managed to hold the bridges.

George Lawrence Price

Gordon Price
St. Symphorien cemetery also contains the graves of the two soldiers believed to be the first (Private John Parr, 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, 21 August 1914) and the last (Private Gordon Price, Canadian Infantry, 11 November 1918) Commonwealth soldiers to be killed during the First World War.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The Battle of Mons was the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in the First World War.