Battle of Mukden

Mukden
The Battle of Mukden, one of the largest land battles to be fought before World War I and the last and the most decisive major land battle of the Russo-Japanese War, was fought from 20 February to 10 March 1905 between Japan and Russia near Mukden in Manchuria.wikipedia
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Shenyang

MukdenFengtianShenyang, China
The Battle of Mukden, one of the largest land battles to be fought before World War I and the last and the most decisive major land battle of the Russo-Japanese War, was fought from 20 February to 10 March 1905 between Japan and Russia near Mukden in Manchuria. The city is now called Shenyang, the capital of Liaoning province in China.
The Battle of Mukden took place in 1905 as part of the Russo-Japanese War.

Liaoning

Liaoning ProvinceFengtianFengtian Province
The city is now called Shenyang, the capital of Liaoning province in China.
When Japan and Russia fought the Russo-Japanese War in 1904–1905, many key battles took place in Liaoning, including the Battle of Port Arthur and the Battle of Mukden, which was, to that point, the largest land battle ever fought.

Ōyama Iwao

Oyama IwaoIwao OyamaIwao Ōyama
The Russian forces, numbering more than 340,000, under General Alexei Nikolajevich Kuropatkin, fought the attacking Imperial Japanese Army forces numbering more than 270,000, led by Marshal Marquess Ōyama Iwao.
He was replaced by General Kodama Gentarō briefly during early 1905 due to illness, but recovered to direct Japanese forces in the final Battle of Mukden.

Russo-Japanese War

Russian-Japanese WarRusso Japanese WarRusso–Japanese War
The Battle of Mukden, one of the largest land battles to be fought before World War I and the last and the most decisive major land battle of the Russo-Japanese War, was fought from 20 February to 10 March 1905 between Japan and Russia near Mukden in Manchuria.

11th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

11th DivisionIJA 11th Division11th Infantry Division
It subsequently formed the core of General Kawamura Kageaki’s 5th Army, where (under the command of Lieutenant General Samejima Shigeo, it played a significant role in securing the Japanese victory at the Battle of Mukden.

Nogi Maresuke

Maresuke NogiGeneral NogiGeneral Nogi Maresuke
The fall of Port Arthur to General Nogi freed up the Japanese 3rd Army, which advanced north to reinforce the Japanese lines near Mukden in preparation for an attack.
He led his Third Army against the Russian forces at the final Battle of Mukden, ending the land combat phase of operations of the war.

List of battles of the Russo-Japanese War

land battlemajorland engagement
The Battle of Mukden, one of the largest land battles to be fought before World War I and the last and the most decisive major land battle of the Russo-Japanese War, was fought from 20 February to 10 March 1905 between Japan and Russia near Mukden in Manchuria.

Kuroki Tamemoto

Tamemoto Kuroki General '''Baron Kuroki TamemotoGeneral Kuroki
He was the head of the Japanese First Army during the Russo-Japanese War; and his forces enjoyed a series of successes during the Manchurian fighting at the Battle of Yalu River, the Battle of Liaoyang, the Battle of Shaho and the Battle of Mukden.

First Army (Japan)

Japanese First Army1st armyFirst Army
Its forces were the first to land in Korea and Manchuria and it fought in most of the major campaigns of the war, including the Battle of Yalu River, Battle of Motien Pass, Battle of Liaoyang, Battle of Shaho, Battle of Sandepu, and Battle of Mukden.

Paul von Rennenkampf

Paul von RennenkampffRennenkampfPaul Georg von Rennenkampff
However, as they crossed the river, the Japanese attack was hampered when they encountered stiff resistance and heavy artillery fire coming from the Russians, now commanded by General Paul von Rennenkampf, resulting in yet more heavy casualties. The generals Aleksandr Samsonov and Paul von Rennenkampf began to loathe each other as Samsonov very publicly accused von Rennenkampf of failing to assist him.
In the Battle of Mukden, Rennenkampf distinguished himself again as during the battle, he commanded the Tsinghechensky detachment, which was stationed at the left bank of the 1st Manchurian Army led by General Nikolai Linevich, during the battle, he showed great persistence, which combined with other reinforcements, was able to repulse Field Marshal Kawmura's offensive.

2nd Manchurian Army

Second Manchurian Army
It participated in the Battle of Shaho, Battle of Sandepu and Battle of Mukden.

Third Army (Japan)

3rd armyJapanese Third ArmyThird Army
After the fall of that Russian stronghold, it was transferred north, where it played a crucial role in the subsequent Japanese drive towards Mukden in the closing stages of the war.

3rd Manchurian Army

Third Manchurian Army
It participated in the Battle of Sandepu and Battle of Mukden.

Alexander von Kaulbars

Alexander KaulbarsA. V. Kaul'barsGeneral Baron von Kaulbars
However, during the Battle of Mukden, his forces were outfought and outflanked by the Imperial Japanese Army and disintegrated in disarray.

Second Army (Japan)

Japanese Second Army2nd ArmyIJA 2nd Army
It fought in most of the major campaigns of the war, including the Battle of Nanshan, Battle of Te-li-Ssu, Battle of Tashihchiao, Battle of Shaho, Battle of Liaoyang, Battle of Sandepu, and Battle of Mukden.

Fifth Army (Japan)

5th ArmyFifth ArmyJapanese Fifth Army
It took successfully part in the battle of Mukden, when the 5th Army flanked the Russian left wing.

Alexander Alexandrovich Bilderling

Alexandr von BilderlingAlexander BilderlingAlexandre von Bilderling
However, after the Battle of Mukden, he was relieved of his command from May–September 1905 and was replaced as commander of the Third Manchurian Army by General Mikhail Batyanov.

Nikolai Linevich

Nikolay Linevich
After the Russian defeat at the Battle of Mukden, General Kuropatkin was relieved of his command, and Linevich was promoted to succeed him as commander in chief of the Russian armies in the Far East.

Aleksey Kuropatkin

Alexei KuropatkinKuropatkinAleksei Kuropatkin
The Russian forces, numbering more than 340,000, under General Alexei Nikolajevich Kuropatkin, fought the attacking Imperial Japanese Army forces numbering more than 270,000, led by Marshal Marquess Ōyama Iwao.
Aleksey Nikolayevich Kuropatkin (Алексе́й Никола́евич Куропа́ткин; March 29, 1848 – January 16, 1925) was the Russian Imperial Minister of War from 1898 to 1904, and often held responsible for major Russian defeats in the Russo-Japanese War, most notably at the Battle of Mukden and the Battle of Liaoyang.

Oskar Gripenberg

Oskar GrippenbergOskar Ferdinand Gripenberg
He spent his final days in continuing his campaign against Kuropatkin in the newspapers, pamphlets and books, blaming him for the Russian defeat at the Battle of Mukden and for the loss of the war in general.

Alexander Samsonov

General SamsonovSamsonovAleksander Samsonov
The generals Aleksandr Samsonov and Paul von Rennenkampf began to loathe each other as Samsonov very publicly accused von Rennenkampf of failing to assist him.
After the Battle of Mukden in 1905, he accused General Paul von Rennenkampff of failing to assist him during the fighting.

Kawamura Kageaki

Kageaki KawamuraGeneral KawamuraKawmura
In January 1905, being promoted to General, he was appointed Commander of the Japanese Fifth Army and took part in the Battle of Mukden.

Oku Yasukata

Yasukata OkuGeneral Oku
During the Russo-Japanese War, Oku went to the front as commanding general of the IJA 2nd Army and was noted for his role in the Battle of Nanshan, Battle of Shaho, Battle of Mukden, and other campaigns.

Nozu Michitsura

General NozuMichitsura Nozu
With the start of the Russo-Japanese War, Nozu was assigned command of the Japanese Fourth Army, which played a crucial role in the Battle of Mukden.