Battle of New Orleans

New Orleansdefense of New Orleansattack on New Orleanscapture of New OrleansLouisiana Campaign1814-15 British invasionassault on New Orleansat New Orleansattack against New Orleansattack New Orleans
The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson.wikipedia
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Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson.
In the concurrent war against the British, Jackson's victory in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero.

Edward Pakenham

Sir Edward PakenhamPakenhamEdward Michael Pakenham
The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson.
On 8 January 1815, Pakenham was killed in action while leading his men at the Battle of New Orleans.

War of 1812

The War of 1812American War of 1812war
In August 1814, Britain and the United States began diplomatic negotiations to end the War of 1812.
In early 1815, the Americans decisively defeated the invading British Army attacking New Orleans, Louisiana.

Treaty of Ghent

peace treatytreatyGhent peace conference
The battle took place directly after the signing of the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814, before news of the treaty could reach the United States.
It took a month for news of the peace treaty to reach the United States during which American forces under Andrew Jackson won the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815, and the British won the Second Battle of Fort Bowyer on February 12, 1815.

Chalmette, Louisiana

ChalmetteFrederick J. Sigur Civic CenterVal Riess Recreation Complex
It took place approximately 5 mi east-southeast of the city of New Orleans, close to the town of Chalmette, Louisiana, and it was a U.S. victory.
In January 1815, the Battle of New Orleans was fought at the Chalmette plantation, then owned by his second son, Ignace Martin de Lino de Chalmette (1755-1815), a maternal half-brother of Col. Pierre Denis de La Ronde (founder of Versailles, Louisiana), who commanded the Louisiana militia's Third Regiment during the battle.

Jean Lafitte

Jean LaffiteJeanLafitte
Jackson's total of 4,732 men was made up of 968 Army regulars, 58 Marines (holding the center of the defensive line), 106 Navy seamen, 1,060 Louisiana militia and volunteers (including 462 blacks), 1,352 Tennessee militia, 986 Kentucky militia, 150 Mississippi militia, and 52 Choctaw warriors, along with a force from pirate Jean Lafitte's Baratarians.
Later, in return for a legal pardon for the smugglers, Lafitte and his comrades helped General Andrew Jackson defend New Orleans from the British in the final battle of the War of 1812.

Thomas ap Catesby Jones

Commodore JonesCommodore Thomas ap Catesby JonesJones, Thomas ap Catesby
An American flotilla of five gunboats prevented their access to the lakes, commanded by Lieutenant Thomas ap Catesby Jones.
Thomas Jones received honors for bravery at the Battle of Lake Borgne (1814), Louisiana, delaying the British before the Battle of New Orleans.

New Orleans

New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans, LAOrleans Parish
It took place approximately 5 mi east-southeast of the city of New Orleans, close to the town of Chalmette, Louisiana, and it was a U.S. victory.
Chalmette Battlefield and National Cemetery, located just south of the city, is the site of the 1815 Battle of New Orleans.

John Keane, 1st Baron Keane

John KeaneSir John Keane Lieutenant-General '''Sir John Keane
Thousands of British soldiers under the command of General John Keane then rowed to Pea Island (possibly now Pearl Island) where they established a garrison, about 30 mi east of New Orleans.
Promoted to Major-General, Keane commanded the British 3rd brigade at the Battle of New Orleans where he was wounded twice.

Thomas Mullins (British Army officer)

Thomas Mullins
Thomas Mullins, the British commander of the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot, had forgotten the ladders and fascines needed to cross the eight-foot deep and fifteen-foot wide canal.
Thomas Mullins (died 1823) was a British Army officer of the 44th Regiment of Foot, best known for his misconduct at the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

Choctaw

Choctaw IndiansChoctawsChoctaw people
Jackson's total of 4,732 men was made up of 968 Army regulars, 58 Marines (holding the center of the defensive line), 106 Navy seamen, 1,060 Louisiana militia and volunteers (including 462 blacks), 1,352 Tennessee militia, 986 Kentucky militia, 150 Mississippi militia, and 52 Choctaw warriors, along with a force from pirate Jean Lafitte's Baratarians.
By the Battle of New Orleans, only a few Choctaw remained with the army; they were the only Native American tribe represented in the battle.

Thomas Hinds

Congressman Thomas Hinds
Major Thomas Hinds' Squadron of Light Dragoons, a militia unit from the Mississippi Territory, arrived at the battle on December 22.
His forces participated with distinction in the Battle of Pensacola (1814) and the Battle of New Orleans (1814–1815), under the command of General Andrew Jackson.

Alexander Cochrane

Sir Alexander CochraneAlexander Forrester Inglis CochraneAdmiral Sir Alexander Cochrane
Sixty British ships had anchored in the Gulf of Mexico to the east of Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Borgne by December 14, 1814 with 14,450 soldiers and sailors aboard under the command of Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane.
But the British army was defeated at the Battle of New Orleans on 8 January 1815.

Rodriguez Canal

He then pulled his forces back to the Rodriguez Canal, about 4 mi south of the city.
The dilapidated canal measured about four feet deep by twenty feet wide at the time of the Battle of New Orleans, and stood as a natural battlefield divide between the combatants.

44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot

44th Regiment of Foot44th Foot44th
Thomas Mullins, the British commander of the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot, had forgotten the ladders and fascines needed to cross the eight-foot deep and fifteen-foot wide canal.
The 1st battalion embarked for North America in 1814 for service in the War of 1812 and saw action at the Battle of Bladensburg in August 1814, the Battle of North Point in September 1814 and the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815.

Mississippi River

MississippiMississippi ValleyMississippi Basin
On the morning of December 23, Keane and a vanguard of 1,800 British soldiers reached the east bank of the Mississippi River, 9 mi south of New Orleans.
The last serious European challenge to U.S. control of the river came at the conclusion of War of 1812 when British forces mounted an attack on New Orleans – the attack was repulsed by an American army under the command of General Andrew Jackson.

Daniel Patterson (naval officer)

Daniel PattersonDaniel Todd PattersonCommodore Daniel Patterson
Colonel William Thornton was to cross the Mississippi during the night with his force of 780, move rapidly upriver, storm the battery commanded by Commodore Daniel Patterson on the flank of the main American entrenchments, and then open an enfilading fire on Jackson's line with the captured artillery, directly across from the earthworks manned by the vast majority of American troops Keane was to lead a column along the river, and Major General Samuel Gibbs was to lead a column along the swamp.
The American victory at the Battle of New Orleans resulted as much from his foresight and preparations as from Jackson's able fighting.

Fort Bowyer

Battle of Fort BowyerSecond Battle of Fort BowyerFirst Battle of Fort Bowyer
The fleet set sail toward Mobile Bay, Alabama on February 4, 1815 with all of the British troops aboard, and the army captured Fort Bowyer at the mouth of Mobile Bay on February 12.
The second attack, following the British defeat at the Battle of New Orleans, was successful.

Kinache

Kinhagee
Other troops included Hitchiti Indians led by Kinache.
During the War of 1812, Kinache reportedly fought with British forces against General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.

John Lambert (British Army officer)

John LambertGeneral John LambertSir John Lambert
The brigade commanded by Major General John Lambert was held in reserve.
Having been sent to America, he joined the army under Sir Edward Pakenham, at the Battle of New Orleans, on 6 January 1815, with the 7th and 43rd regiments.

The Buccaneer (1938 film)

The Buccaneer19381938 effort
The Buccaneer is a 1938 American adventure film made by Paramount Pictures and based on Jean Lafitte and the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

The Eighth (United States)

The Eighth
The anniversary of the battle was celebrated as an American holiday for many years called "The Eighth".
The Eighth was a federal holiday in the United States from 1828 until 1861 commemorating the U.S. victory in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815.

William Thornton (British Army officer)

William ThorntonThorntonLt.-General Sir William Thornton
Colonel William Thornton was to cross the Mississippi during the night with his force of 780, move rapidly upriver, storm the battery commanded by Commodore Daniel Patterson on the flank of the main American entrenchments, and then open an enfilading fire on Jackson's line with the captured artillery, directly across from the earthworks manned by the vast majority of American troops Keane was to lead a column along the river, and Major General Samuel Gibbs was to lead a column along the swamp.
Thornton was then involved in the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815, at which the only British success was on the west bank of the Mississippi River, where Thornton's brigade, comprising the 85th Regiment and a detachment of one hundred sailors from the Royal Navy and one hundred men of the Royal Marines, attacked and overwhelmed the American line.

Fort St. Philip

St. PhilipForts St. PhilipFort Saint Philip
The British planned to sail up the Mississippi River, but Fort St. Philip stood in the way, protecting New Orleans from an amphibious assault from the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River.
Specifically, the fort held its defenses against British Navy vessels who were bombarding it, in a final attempt to invade Louisiana following the defeat of the British Army near New Orleans.

Alexander Dickson (British Army officer)

Alexander DicksonSir Alexander Dickson Major-General '''Sir Alexander Dickson
General Lambert ordered his Chief of Artillery Colonel Alexander Dickson to assess the position.
He was at the disastrous Battle of New Orleans, but returned to Europe in time for the Waterloo campaign.