A report on Battle of Okinawa

US Marine from the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines on Wana Ridge provides covering fire with his Thompson submachine gun, 18 May 1945.
A map of US operations at Okinawa
Tekketsu Kinnōtai child soldiers on Okinawa
The battleship USS Idaho (BB-42) shelling Okinawa on 1 April 1945
Generals Mitsuru Ushijima, Isamu Chō and other officers of the Thirty-Second Army in Okinawa, April 1945
US Marine reinforcements wade ashore to support the beachhead on Okinawa, 1 April 1945.
A 6th Marine Division demolition crew watches explosive charges detonate and destroy a Japanese cave, May 1945.
US Marines pass a dead Japanese soldier in a destroyed village, April 1945.
American soldiers of the 77th Infantry Division listen impassively to radio reports of Victory in Europe Day on 8 May 1945.
Soldiers of the 96th Infantry Division attack Japanese positions on Big Apple Ridge.
Lt. Col. Richard P. Ross Jr., commander of 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines braves sniper fire to place the United States' colors over the parapets of Shuri Castle on 30 May. This flag was first raised over Cape Gloucester and then Peleliu.
A Japanese prisoner of war sits behind barbed wire after he and 306 others were captured within the last 24 hours of the battle by 6th Marine Division.
Two US Coast Guardsmen pay homage to their comrade killed in the Ryukyu Islands.
Two wounded American soldiers make their way to a medical aid station on Okinawa, 20 April 1945.
Two US M4 Sherman tanks knocked out by Japanese artillery at Bloody Ridge, 20 April 1945
The last picture of US Army Lt. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. (right), taken on 18 June 1945. Later in the day, he was killed by Japanese artillery fire.
The last picture of US Army Brig. Gen. Claudius Miller Easley, taken on 19 June 1945. He was later killed by Japanese machine-gun fire.
A group of Japanese prisoners taken on the island of Okuku in June 1945
A US Marine Corps Stinson Sentinel observation plane flies over the razed Naha, capital of Okinawa, in May 1945.
Two US Marines share a foxhole with an Okinawan war orphan in April 1945.
Overcoming the civilian resistance on Okinawa was aided by US propaganda leaflets, one of which is being read by a prisoner awaiting transport.
The Cornerstone of Peace Memorial with names of all military and civilians from all countries who died in the Battle of Okinawa
Marines celebrate Victory over Japan Day on Okinawa, August 1945
Japanese commanders of Okinawa (photographed early in February 1945). In center: (1) Admiral Minoru Ota, (2) Lt. Gen. Mitsuru Ushijima, (3) Lt. Gen. Isamu Cho, (4) Col. Hitoshi Kanayama, (5) Col. Kikuji Hongo, and (6) Col. Hiromichi Yahara
Japanese soldiers arriving on Okinawa
Japanese high school girls wave farewell to a kamikaze pilot departing to Okinawa
A US military diagram of typical Japanese hill defensive tunnels and installations
A Japanese Type 89 150mm gun hidden inside a cave defensive system
A map of Okinawa's airfields, 1945
The super battleship {{Ship|Japanese battleship|Yamato||2}} explodes after persistent attacks from US aircraft.
American aircraft carrier {{USS|Bunker Hill|CV-17|6}} burns after being hit by two kamikaze planes within 30 seconds.
Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm Avengers, Seafires and Fireflies on {{HMS|Implacable|R86|6}} warm up their engines before taking off.
{{HMS|Formidable|67|6}} on fire after a kamikaze attack on May 4. The ship was out of action for fifty minutes.

Major battle of the Pacific War fought on the island of Okinawa by United States Army (USA) and United States Marine Corps (USMC) forces against the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA).

- Battle of Okinawa
US Marine from the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines on Wana Ridge provides covering fire with his Thompson submachine gun, 18 May 1945.

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Claudius Miller Easley

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Easley with an M1 Garand.
The last known photograph of Brigadier General Easley in Okinawa, taken about two hours before he was killed in action.
Brigadier General Easley's memorial monument in Okinawa, Japan. 26.11462°N, 127.68042°W

Brigadier General Claudius Miller Easley (July 11, 1891 – June 19, 1945) was a decorated United States Army officer who was killed in action by the Japanese during the Battle of Okinawa.

Masahide Ōta

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Japanese academic and politician who served as the governor of Okinawa Prefecture from 1990 until 1998.

Japanese academic and politician who served as the governor of Okinawa Prefecture from 1990 until 1998.

After starting his career as a professor at the University of the Ryūkyūs, he wrote books in English and Japanese, mostly about the Battle of Okinawa and Japan–United States bilateral relations following World War II.

Fred Faulkner Lester

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United States Navy hospital corpsman who was killed in action during World War II while assigned to a Marine Corps rifle company.

United States Navy hospital corpsman who was killed in action during World War II while assigned to a Marine Corps rifle company.

He was posthumously awarded the nation's highest military decoration for valor, the Medal of Honor, for heroic actions "above and beyond the call of duty" on June 8, 1945, during the Battle of Okinawa.

Boeitai

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Japanese force of World War II.

Japanese force of World War II.

Around 20,000 local Boeitai were involved in the Battle of Okinawa during 1945, with most initially serving as labourers or in support roles but some augmenting frontline Army units.

Private Robert M. McTureous Jr.

Robert M. McTureous Jr.

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Private Robert M. McTureous Jr.
Pvt. Robert M. McTureous grave in Umatilla, Florida

Robert Miller McTureous Jr. (March 26, 1924 – June 11, 1945) was a United States Marine and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions during the Battle of Okinawa in World War II.

The Fat Man mushroom cloud resulting from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rises into the air from the hypocenter.

Debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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Substantial debate exists over the ethical, legal, and military aspects of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 August and 9 August 1945 at the close of World War II (1939–45).

Substantial debate exists over the ethical, legal, and military aspects of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 August and 9 August 1945 at the close of World War II (1939–45).

The Fat Man mushroom cloud resulting from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rises into the air from the hypocenter.
A map outlining the Japanese and U.S. (but not other Allied) ground forces scheduled to take part in the ground battle for Japan. Two landings were planned:
(1) Olympic – the invasion of the southern island, Kyūshū,
(2) Coronet – the invasion of the main island, Honshū.
March 1946's Operation Coronet was planned to take Tokyo with a landing of 25 divisions, compared to D-Day's 12 divisions.
This Tokyo residential section was virtually destroyed following the Operation Meetinghouse fire-bombing of Tokyo on the night of 9/10 March 1945, which was the single deadliest air raid in human history; with a greater loss of life than the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima or Nagasaki as single events or a greater civilian death toll and area of fire damage than both nuclear bombings combined.
Chinese civilians massacred during Japan's campaign of total war in Xuzhou
The cenotaph at the Hiroshima Peace Park is inscribed with the sentence: "Let all the souls here rest in peace; this mistake shall not be repeated." Although the sentence may seem ambiguous, it has been clarified that its intended agent is all of humanity, and the mistake referred to is war in general.
Fire bombing in Tokyo

Delivered on June 15, 1945, after insight gained from the Battle of Okinawa, the study noted Japan's inadequate defenses resulting from a very effective sea blockade and the Allied firebombing campaign.

62nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

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Infantry division of the Imperial Japanese Army.

Infantry division of the Imperial Japanese Army.

Starting on 1 April 1945, the division fought in the Battle of Okinawa, countering an initial US advances at Chatan-Toguchi to the north and Naha-Yonabaru to the south.

1st Battalion, 5th Marines insignia

1st Battalion, 5th Marines

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Infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California consisting of approximately 800 Marines and sailors.

Infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California consisting of approximately 800 Marines and sailors.

1st Battalion, 5th Marines insignia
Leader of the 1st squad, 3rd Platoon, Company C, 1/5 Marines, runs under Viet Cong fire during Operation Tippecanoe, 14–16 March 1967
Marines from 1/5's Charlie Company at MCB Twentynine Palms in 1985
Marines from A/1/5 engage insurgents in Fallujah during Operation Vigilant Resolve on 7 April 2004.
Marines with A/1/5 peer over a building top to fix enemy targets in Al Fallujah, Iraq 7 April 2004.

The fighting in World War II found the Marines of 1st Battalion at Guadalcanal, New Guinea, Peleliu, and Okinawa.

Shuri Castle

Shuri, Okinawa

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District of the city of Naha, Okinawa.

District of the city of Naha, Okinawa.

Shuri Castle
A cobblestone road in Shuri-kinjocho
Shuri in Taishō period

As Shuri was the center of the Japanese defense, it was the prime target of American assault in the battle of Okinawa which was fought from March to June 1945.

Richmond K. Turner

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Best known for commanding the Amphibious Force during the campaign across the Pacific.

Best known for commanding the Amphibious Force during the campaign across the Pacific.

Quote,"Deliver for D-Day!"
Turner with Marine Major General Vandegrift during the planning of Operation Watchtower in July–August 1942.
Turner's headstone at Golden Gate National Cemetery

At the Battle of Okinawa Turner commanded Task Force 51 which included the Northern Attack Force, Rear Admiral Lawrence Fairfax Reifsnider, the Southern Attack Force, Rear Admiral Hill, Expeditionary Troops, Lt. General Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr., Western Island Attack Group, Rear Admiral Ingolf N. Kiland, Amphibious Support Force Rear Admiral William H. P. Blandy and Gunfire and Covering Force, Rear Admiral Morton Deyo.