Battle of Omdurman

OmdurmanKhartoumcampaign at the Sudan in 1898battle of 1898butcher of Omdurman”campaigncampaign at Sudan in 1898his last standKitchener's attackNile Expedition
At the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898), an army commanded by the British General Sir Herbert Kitchener defeated the army of Abdullah al-Taashi, the successor to the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad.wikipedia
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Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener

Lord KitchenerKitchenerHerbert Kitchener
At the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898), an army commanded by the British General Sir Herbert Kitchener defeated the army of Abdullah al-Taashi, the successor to the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad.
Kitchener was credited in 1898 for winning the Battle of Omdurman and securing control of the Sudan for which he was made Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, becoming a qualifying peer and of mid-rank as an Earl.

Omdurman

JarafaKarariOmdurman Capital
Omdurman is today a suburb of Khartoum in central Sudan, with a population of some 1.5 million.
However, in the Battle of Omdurman in 1898 (which actually took place in the nearby village of Kerreri), Lord Kitchener decisively defeated the Mahdist forces and killed the Khalifa, ensuring British control over the Sudan.

Khartoum

Khartoum, SudanKhartoum-basedKhartuom
Omdurman is today a suburb of Khartoum in central Sudan, with a population of some 1.5 million.
On 2 September 1898, Omdurman was the scene of the bloody Battle of Omdurman, during which British forces under Herbert Kitchener defeated the Mahdist forces defending the city.

Sudan

🇸🇩SudaneseRepublic of the Sudan
It was a demonstration of the superiority of a highly disciplined army equipped with modern rifles, machine guns, and artillery over a force twice their size armed with older weapons, and marked the success of British efforts to re-conquer the Sudan.
Kitchener's campaigns culminated in a decisive victory in the Battle of Omdurman on 2 September 1898.

Battle of Umm Diwaykarat

Umm DiwaykaratUmm Diwaikarat
However, it was not until the 1899 Battle of Umm Diwaykarat that the final Mahdist forces were defeated.
The Battle of Umm Diwaykarat on November 25, 1899 marked the final defeat of the Mahdist state in Sudan, when Anglo-Egyptian forces under the command of Lord Kitchener defeated what was left of the Mahdist armies under the command of the Abdallahi ibn Muhammad, known as the Khalifa, after the equally disastrous Battle of Omdurman a year earlier.

Maxim gun

MaximMaxim machine gunsMaxim machine gun
The 52 quick firing guns of the British artillery opened fire at around 2750 m, inflicting severe casualties on the Mahdist forces before they even came within range of the Maxim guns and volley fire.
Modern historical accounts suggest that, while it was effective in pitched battles, as in the Matabele war or the 1898 Battle of Omdurman, its significance owed much to its psychological impact.

21st Lancers

21st (Empress of India's) Lancers21st Hussars21st Lancers (Empress of India's)
The British light cavalry regiment, the 21st Lancers, was sent ahead to clear the plain to Omdurman. Thomas Byrne, Private, 21st Lancers
Perhaps its most famous engagement was the Battle of Omdurman, where Winston Churchill (then an officer of the 4th Hussars), rode with the unit.

Winston Churchill

ChurchillSir Winston ChurchillChurchill, Winston
One of the participants of this fight was Lieutenant Winston Churchill.
Arriving in Egypt, he joined the 21st Lancers at Cairo before they headed south along the River Nile to take part in the Battle of Omdurman against the army of Sudanese leader Abdallahi ibn Muhammad.

Abdallahi ibn Muhammad

KhalifaThe KhalifaAbdullahi ibn Muhammad
At the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898), an army commanded by the British General Sir Herbert Kitchener defeated the army of Abdullah al-Taashi, the successor to the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad.
At the Battle of Omdurman on September 2, 1898, his army of 52,000 men was destroyed.

Queen's Sudan Medal

Queen Victoria's Sudan MedalQueen's Sudan Medal (1897)
Queen's Sudan Medal, British campaign medal awarded to British and Egyptian forces which took part in the Sudan campaign between 1896 and 1898.
British Army units joined from early 1898, with two British brigades being present at the decisive victory at Omdurman on 2 September 1898, in which Winston Churchill took part.

Royal Lincolnshire Regiment

Lincolnshire Regiment10th Regiment of Foot10th Foot
They pressed Macdonald's Sudanese brigades hard, but Wauchope's brigade with the Lincolnshire Regiment was quickly brought up and with sustained section volleys repulsed the advance.
The 1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment was posted at Malta from 1895, and took part in the Battle of Omdurman in September 1898 during the Mahdist War.

Cavalry

cavalrymenhorsehorsemen
The British and Egyptian cavalry were placed on either flank.
Cavalry found a new role in colonial campaigns (irregular warfare), where modern weapons were lacking and the slow moving infantry-artillery train or fixed fortifications were often ineffective against indigenous insurgents (unless the latter offered a fight on an equal footing, as at Tel-el-Kebir, Omdurman, etc.).

Ernest Bennett (politician)

Ernest BennettSir Ernest BennettBennett
The debate was ignited by a highly critical article published by Ernest Bennett (present at the battle as a journalist) in the Contemporary Review, which evoked a fierce riposte and defense of Kitchener by Bennet Burleigh (another journalist also present at the battle).
He witnessed the Battle of Omdurman, in which an Anglo-Egyptian army of 25,000 defeated some 50,000 Ansar (or Dervish) followers of the Khalifa to the Mahdi.

Mahdi

Imam MahdiMahdīal-Mahdi
At the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898), an army commanded by the British General Sir Herbert Kitchener defeated the army of Abdullah al-Taashi, the successor to the self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad.
Muhammad Ahmad (1845–1885), a Sudanese Sufi sheikh of the Samaniyya order, declared himself Mahdi in June 1881 and went on to lead a successful military campaign against the Turko-Egyptian government of Sudan. Although he died shortly after capturing the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, in 1885, the Mahdist state continued under his successor, Abdallahi ibn Muhammad, until 1898, when it fell to the British army following the Battle of Omdurman.

Ansar (Sudan)

AnsarMahdistAnsaar
Abdullah's followers, calling themselves the Ansar and known to the British as the Dervishes, numbered around 50,000, including some 3,000 cavalry.
After careful preparations and a slow advance, on 2 September 1898 the main Anglo-Egyptian forces engaged with a Mahdist army of 52,000 at the Battle of Omdurman.

Siege of Khartoum

Khartoumfall of KhartoumRelief of Khartoum
After his death in 1885, following the successful siege of Khartoum, his successor (Khalifa) Abdullah retained it as his capital.
On 2 September 1898 Kitchener's troops defeated the bulk of the Mahdist army at the Battle of Omdurman.

Charles George Gordon

General GordonCharles GordonGordon
Kitchener was seeking revenge for the 1885 death of General Gordon.
To block the French, a British force under Herbert Kitchener was sent to destroy the Mahdiyah state and annihilated the Ansar at the Battle of Omdurman in 1898.

Hector MacDonald

MacDonaldLieutenant Hector Archibald MacDonaldSir Hector Archibald MacDonald
To protect the rear, a brigade of 3,000 mainly Sudanese, commanded by Hector MacDonald, was reinforced with Maxims and artillery and followed the main force at around 1350 m. Curiously, the supplies and wounded around Egeiga were left almost unprotected.
At the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898) the British commander, Lord Kitchener, unwittingly exposed his flanks to the Dervish (i.e., Mahdist) army.

Thomas Byrne (VC)

Thomas Byrne
Thomas Byrne, Private, 21st Lancers
On 2 September 1898 at the Battle of Omdurman, Sudan, Private Byrne turned back in the middle of the charge of the 21st Lancers and went to the assistance of a lieutenant of the Royal Horse Guards who was wounded, dismounted, disarmed and being attacked by several Dervishes.

Ali wad Hilu

Abdullah al-Taashi and 17,000 men were concealed behind the Surgham Hills to the west and rear of Osman Azrak's force, with 20,000 more positioned to the north-west, close to the front behind the Kerreri hills, commanded by Ali wad Hilu and Osman Sheikh ed-Din.
When the British re-invaded the Sudan, at the Battle of Omdurman (2 September 1898) he led a force of 5,000 fighting under his green flag.

Camel cavalry

camel troopscamelscamelry
The commander of the Anglo-Egyptian mounted troops Lieutenant Colonel R.G. Broadwood used his cavalry to draw off part of the advancing Ansar attackers under Osman Din but the slower-moving camel troops, attempting to regain the protection of the zariba, found themselves being closely pursued by Green Standard horsemen.
The British-officered Egyptian Camel Corps played a significant role in the 1898 Battle of Omdurman; one of the few occasions during this period when this class of mounted troops took part in substantial numbers in a set-piece battle.

The River War

The River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the SoudanThe River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the SudanThe River War: An Historical Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan
He published his account of the battle in 1899 as "The River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan". Present as a war correspondent for The Times was Colonel Frank Rhodes, brother of Cecil, who was shot and severely wounded in the right arm.
After the Battle of Omdurman the Lancers were ordered to return to other duties so Churchill's personal experience of the war ceased at that point.

Young Winston

The 1972 film Young Winston includes a depiction of the initial Anglo-Egyptian artillery bombardment at the start of the battle as well as a recreation of the charge of the 21st Lancers.
The second half covers his service as a cavalry officer in India and the Sudan, during which he takes part in the cavalry charge at Omdurman, his experiences as a war correspondent in the Second Boer War, during which he is captured and escapes, and his election to Parliament at the age of 26.

The Two and a Half Feathers

In the episode called The Two and a Half Feathers there is an extended flashback to the days directly before the battle, narrated by Jones.
As they sit, Jones enters in his old Sudanese uniform, and informs Mainwaring that he's off to the 42nd annual reunion for the veterans of the Battle of Omdurman.

Nevill Smyth

Sir Nevill Maskelyne SmythN.M. SmythNevill Maskelyne Smyth
Nevill Smyth, Captain, 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays), attached to the Egyptian Army.
On 2 September came the Battle of Omdurman.