Battle of Plassey

PlasseyBattle of Palashi1757 conquestBattle of Plessey1757 territorial conquest23 June 1757Anglo-FrenchBengal in 1757British colonizationin power
The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive which was possible due to the defection of Mir Jafar Ali Khan.wikipedia
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Nawabs of Bengal and Murshidabad

Nawab of BengalNawabs of BengalNawab of Murshidabad
The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive which was possible due to the defection of Mir Jafar Ali Khan. The British then deposed Mir Jafar and installed Mir Qasim as the Nawab of Bengal.
Nawab Siraj ud-Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, lost the Battle of Plassey to the British East India Company in 1757.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
The battle helped the Company seize control of Bengal.
It was conquered by the British East India Company after the Battle of Plassey in 1757 and became the Bengal Presidency of the British Raj.

Mir Jafar

Mir Jafar Ali KhanJafar Ali KhanMir Jaffar
The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive which was possible due to the defection of Mir Jafar Ali Khan.
Mir Jafar served as the commander of Bengali forces under Siraj ud-Daulah, the Nawab of Bengal, but betrayed him during the Battle of Plassey and succeeded him after the British victory in 1757.

West Bengal

West Bengal, IndiaBengalWestern Bengal
The battle took place at Palashi (Anglicised version: Plassey) on the banks of the Hooghly River, about 150 km north of Calcutta and south of Murshidabad, then capital of Bengal (now in Murshidabad district in West Bengal).
By the 18th century, the state was ruled by the Nawabs of Bengal, before being conquered by the British East India Company at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

Bengal Subah

Mughal BengalBengalMughal
The battle took place at Palashi (Anglicised version: Plassey) on the banks of the Hooghly River, about 150 km north of Calcutta and south of Murshidabad, then capital of Bengal (now in Murshidabad district in West Bengal).
Bengal was subject to further deindustrialization, after being conquered by the British East India Company at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

Murshidabad

KarnasuvarnaMoorshedabadMoorshedábád
The battle took place at Palashi (Anglicised version: Plassey) on the banks of the Hooghly River, about 150 km north of Calcutta and south of Murshidabad, then capital of Bengal (now in Murshidabad district in West Bengal).
The city's decline began with the defeat of the last independent Nawab of Bengal Siraj-ud-Daulah at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
The British further used this revenue to increase their military might and push the other European colonial powers such as the Dutch and the French out of South Asia, thus expanding the British Empire.
It then became the dominant power in the Indian subcontinent after the East India Company's conquest of Mughal Bengal at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive which was possible due to the defection of Mir Jafar Ali Khan.
The battles of Plassey and Buxar, in which the British defeated the Bengali powers, left the company in control of Bengal with the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar, and a major military and political power in India.

Black Hole of Calcutta

Black HoleHolwell Monumentdungeon in Calcutta
The battle was preceded by an attack on British-controlled Calcutta by Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah and the Black Hole massacre.
With his troops and local Indian allies, Clive recaptured Calcutta in January 1757, and went on to defeat Siraj ud-Daulah at the Battle of Plassey, which resulted in Siraj being overthrown as Nawab of Bengal and killed.

Chandannagar

ChandernagoreChandernagorChandannagore
Clive then seized the initiative to capture the French fort of Chandernagar.
It boasts a collection of French antiques (such as cannons used in Anglo-French war, wooden furniture of the 18th century, etc.) which are difficult to find anywhere else in the world.

Siraj ud-Daulah

Siraj-ud-daulahSiraj Ud DaulahSiraj-ud-Daula
The belligerents were the Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, and the British East India Company.
Siraj succeeded his maternal grandfather, Alivardi Khan as the Nawab of Bengal in April 1756 at the age of 23, but he was soon betrayed by his commander in chief Mir Zafar in the Battle of Plassey against the British.He died on 23 june 1757 at the age of 23-24 soon after annexing the throne of Bengal.After his death his kingdom was annexed by the British and Mir Zafar was made the ruler.

Charles Watson (Royal Navy officer)

Charles WatsonAdmiral Charles WatsonAdmiral Watson
The British sent reinforcements under Colonel Robert Clive and Admiral Charles Watson from Madras to Bengal and recaptured Calcutta.
However the Nawab was subsequently bolstered by French support, and the Battle of Chandannagar in March, and then the Battle of Plassey in June 1757, followed.

Robert Clive

Clive of IndiaLord CliveRobert Clive, 1st Baron Clive
The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive which was possible due to the defection of Mir Jafar Ali Khan.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
The battle was waged during the Seven Years' War (1756–1763), and, in a mirror of their European rivalry, the French East India Company (La Compagnie des Indes Orientales) sent a small contingent to fight against the British.
The war began in Southern India but spread into Bengal, where British forces under Robert Clive recaptured Calcutta from the Nawab Siraj ud-Daulah, a French ally, and ousted him from his throne at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

Omichund

Amir ChandUmichand
Siraj set up his headquarters in Omichund's garden.
Omichund or Umichand (died 1767) was a native merchant of Bengal Nawabi period in India who was one of the principal authors of the conspiracy against Nawab and associated with the treaty negotiated by Robert Clive before the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

Nawab

naibNawabsNawabzada
The belligerents were the Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal, and the British East India Company.

Eyre Coote (East India Company officer)

Eyre CooteSir Eyre CooteSir Eyre Coote, KB
On 9 January 1757, a force of 650 men under Captain Coote and Major Kilpatrick stormed and sacked the town of Hooghly, 23 mi north of Calcutta. On 17 June, Clive despatched a force of 200 Europeans, 500 sepoys, one field piece and a small howitzer under Major Coote of the 39th Foot to capture the fort.
Soon afterwards came the Battle of Plassey, which would probably never have taken place but for Coote's advice at the council of war; after the defeat of the Nawab he led a detachment in pursuit of the French for 400 miles under extraordinary difficulties.

Palashi

Plassey
The battle took place at Palashi (Anglicised version: Plassey) on the banks of the Hooghly River, about 150 km north of Calcutta and south of Murshidabad, then capital of Bengal (now in Murshidabad district in West Bengal).
It is particularly well known due to the Battle of Plassey fought there in June 1757, between the private army of the British East India Company and the army of the king of Bengal, Nawab Siraj Ud Daulah.

102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers)

1st Madras European FusiliersMadras European Regiment102nd Foot
It saw action at the Siege of Arcot in autumn 1751 during the Second Carnatic War and went on to fight at the Battle of Plassey in June 1757, the Battle of Condore in December 1758 and the Battle of Wandiwash in January 1760 during the Seven Years' War.

Mir Madan

Behind them were a body of 5,000 cavalry and 7,000 infantry commanded by the Nawab's faithful general Mir madan Khan and Diwan Mohanlal.
He died in the Battle of Plassey.

Jagat Seth

Jagat SethsJagat Sheth
The British, worried about being outnumbered, formed a conspiracy with Siraj-ud-Daulah's demoted army chief Mir Jafar, along with others such as Yar Lutuf Khan, Jagat Seths (Mahtab Chand and Swarup Chand), Umichand and Rai Durlabh.

39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot

39th Regiment of Foot39th Foot39th Regiment
On 17 June, Clive despatched a force of 200 Europeans, 500 sepoys, one field piece and a small howitzer under Major Coote of the 39th Foot to capture the fort.
Under the command of Major Eyre Coote, the regiment played a major part in capturing the fort of Katwa at the Battle of Plassey in June 1757.

Katwa

By 16 June, the British force had reached Paltee, 12 mi north of which lay the strategically important town and fort of Katwa.
In the Battle of Plassey (1757), on 19 June 1757, Katwa was the last Nawabi garrison conquered by British forces before heading to Plassey.

Mir Qasim

Mir KasimNawab Mir QasimMir Kashim
The British then deposed Mir Jafar and installed Mir Qasim as the Nawab of Bengal.
He was installed as Nawab with the support of the British East India Company, replacing Mir Jafar, his father-in-law, who had himself been supported earlier by the East India Company after his role in the Battle of Plassey.

William Watts

William Watts, the Company representative at the court of Siraj, informed Clive about a conspiracy at the court to overthrow the ruler.
Watts played a role in forging the grand conspiracy against Siraj Ud Daulah which led to the Battle of Plassey.