Battle of Quatre Bras

Quatre BrasQuatre-Brasbattles of Quatre Brasengaged at Quatre Brasfighting at Quatre BrasQuatrebras
The Battle of Quatre Bras was fought on 16 June 1815, as a preliminary engagement to the decisive Battle of Waterloo that occurred two days later.wikipedia
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Battle of Waterloo

Waterloobattlethe Battle of Waterloo
The Battle of Quatre Bras was fought on 16 June 1815, as a preliminary engagement to the decisive Battle of Waterloo that occurred two days later.
On 16 June, he successfully attacked the bulk of the Prussian army at the Battle of Ligny with his main force, while a portion of the French army simultaneously attacked an Anglo-allied army at the Battle of Quatre Bras.

Order of battle of the Waterloo Campaign

French Army Order of BattleI CorpsIV Corps
The headquarters of the Anglo-allied First Corps (Prince of Orange's), however, decided to ignore Wellington's order that it should assemble in and around Nivelles, instead opting to take the initiative and converge on Quatre Bras.
On 16 June 1815, at the battle of Quatre Bras, in command of the Left Wing: I Corps, II Corps (minus the Girard division, present at the battle of Ligny), III Cavalry Corps (minus the l'Héritier division, present at the battle of Ligny) and Imperial Guard light cavalry division.

Jean Victor de Constant Rebecque

Baron RebecqueColonel Rebecquede Constant Rebecque
At the headquarters of the I Corps at Genappe (about five kilometres (3 miles) from Quatre Bras), Major-General Jean Victor de Constant Rebecque, chief of staff to the Prince of Orange, realized the danger and ordered Lieutenant-General Hendrik George de Perponcher Sedlnitsky, the commander of the 2nd Dutch Division, to dispatch his 2nd Brigade (Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach) to occupy Quatre Bras.
As chief-of-staff of the Netherlands Mobile Army he countermanded the order of the Duke of Wellington to evacuate Dutch troops from Quatre Bras on the eve of the Battle of Quatre Bras, thereby preventing Marshal Michel Ney from occupying that strategic crossroads.

Hendrik George de Perponcher Sedlnitsky

PerponcherSedlnitskyBaron de Perponcher-Sedlnitzky
At the headquarters of the I Corps at Genappe (about five kilometres (3 miles) from Quatre Bras), Major-General Jean Victor de Constant Rebecque, chief of staff to the Prince of Orange, realized the danger and ordered Lieutenant-General Hendrik George de Perponcher Sedlnitsky, the commander of the 2nd Dutch Division, to dispatch his 2nd Brigade (Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach) to occupy Quatre Bras.
He commanded the 2nd Netherlands Division at the Battle of Quatre Bras and the Battle of Waterloo.

Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1792–1862)

Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-EisenachPrince Bernhard of Saxe-WeimarBernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach
At the headquarters of the I Corps at Genappe (about five kilometres (3 miles) from Quatre Bras), Major-General Jean Victor de Constant Rebecque, chief of staff to the Prince of Orange, realized the danger and ordered Lieutenant-General Hendrik George de Perponcher Sedlnitsky, the commander of the 2nd Dutch Division, to dispatch his 2nd Brigade (Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach) to occupy Quatre Bras.
He fought at the Battle of Quatre Bras and the Battle of Waterloo where he commanded the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Dutch Division and became a Chief Commander of the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army

William II of the Netherlands

William IIPrince of OrangeKing William II
Wellington first received reports of the outbreak of hostilities at around 15:00 on 15 June from the Prince of Orange, a Coalition commander.
He relinquished command on the arrival of the Duke of Wellington, and, though this was his first real battle, fought with the title of "General" I Allied Corps at the Battle of Quatre Bras (16 June 1815) and the Battle of Waterloo (18 June 1815), where he was wounded.

Michel Ney

Marshal NeyNeyMarshall Ney
The battle took place near the strategic crossroads of Quatre Bras and was contested between elements of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army and the left wing of Napoleon Bonaparte's French Armée du Nord under Marshal Michel Ney.
Ney attacked Wellington at Quatre Bras (and received criticism for attacking slowly, ) while Napoleon attacked Blücher's Prussians at Ligny.

Willem Frederik van Bylandt

BylandtCount of Bylandtmajor-general Van Bylandt
Early on the evening of 15 June, instead of obeying Wellington's order to concentrate the I Corps at Nivelles (which would have meant that the force occupying Quatre Bras would be abandoning the position), Rebecque ordered the 1st Brigade (Count of Bylandt) of the 2nd Dutch Division to reinforce Prince Bernhard's 2nd Brigade.
Willem Frederik count of Bylandt or Bijlandt (June 5, 1771 – October 25, 1855) was a Dutch lieutenant-general who as a major-general commanded a Belgian-Dutch infantry brigade at the Battle of Quatre Bras and the Battle of Waterloo.

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Duke of WellingtonWellingtonArthur Wellesley
The battle took place near the strategic crossroads of Quatre Bras and was contested between elements of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army and the left wing of Napoleon Bonaparte's French Armée du Nord under Marshal Michel Ney.
The French invaded Belgium, with Napoleon defeating the Prussians at Ligny, and Marshal Ney engaging indecisively with Wellington, at the Battle of Quatre Bras.

Hundred Days

Hundred Days CampaignWar of the Seventh CoalitionSeventh Coalition
Napoleon intended to cross the border into what is now Belgium (but was then part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands) without alerting the Coalition leaders and drive a wedge between their forces.
On 16 June, the French prevailed, with Marshal Ney commanding the left wing of the French army holding Wellington at the Battle of Quatre Bras and Napoleon defeating Blücher at the Battle of Ligny.

Quatre Bras

The battle took place near the strategic crossroads of Quatre Bras and was contested between elements of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army and the left wing of Napoleon Bonaparte's French Armée du Nord under Marshal Michel Ney.
On June 16, 1815 near the crossroads of Quatre Bras, the Battle of Quatre Bras (part of the Waterloo Campaign) was fought between contingents of the Anglo-Allied army and the left wing of the French Army.

Ligny

Ligny-en-Cambrésis
The crossroads at Quatre Bras therefore became a strategic position, since if the French held this interchange, they could prevent Wellington's forces from moving south-eastward along the Nivelles-Namur road towards the Prussians, where Napoleon was planning to engage von Blücher on 16 June at Ligny.
It is known as the site of the Battle of Ligny, where Napoleon defeated Blücher two days before the battle of Waterloo while Wellington and Marshal Ney were engaged at Quatre Bras.

Duchy of Brunswick

BrunswickDuke of BrunswickBraunschweig
As the day wore on, fresh Dutch, British and Brunswickers arrived faster than fresh French troops (who eventually numbered about 24,000).
Frederick William 1806–1807, 1813–1815. Son of Charles William Ferdinand. During the Napoleonic Wars, from 1806 to 1813, France occupied Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. Died in battle at Quatre Bras.

Black Brunswickers

Brunswick OelsBrunswickBrunswick Corps
The Brunswick Corps, under the Duke of Brunswick, now reached the field, but their commander received a mortal wound while leading a charge and the attack failed.
The Black Brunswickers earned themselves a fearsome reputation over the following decade, taking part in several significant battles including the pre-Waterloo engagement at Quatre Bras on 16 June 1815, where the Duke lost his life.

François Étienne de Kellermann

KellermannFrançois Etienne de KellermannKellerman
Accordingly Marshal Ney, to whom III Cavalry Corps (Kellermann) was now attached, was to mass at Quatre Bras and push an advance guard 10 km northward of that place, sending a connecting division at Marbais to link him with Grouchy.
He led his squadrons in a famous cavalry charge at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16 June 1815.

Robert Macara

Macara
Regiments of the British 9th Brigade (Pack) — 42nd ("Black Watch", Macara), 44th ("East Essex", Hamerton) and 92nd ("Gordon Highlanders", John Cameron) — held up against the infantry.
Lieutenant-colonel Sir Robert Macara (175916 June 1815) was a British Army officer who fought in the Peninsular War and was killed at the Battle of Quatre Bras during the Waterloo Campaign.

Charles Lefebvre-Desnouettes

Lefebvre-DesnouettesLefebvreMarshal Lefebvre
Prince Bernhard was able to deploy prior to the arrival of the first French scouts, lancers of the Guard Light Cavalry Division (Lefebvre-Desnouettes) who approached Quatre Bras.
He joined Napoleon in the Hundred Days and was appointed commander of the Guard Light Cavalry Division, which he commanded at the Battle of Quatre Bras.

Order of battle of the Battle of Quatre Bras

France and Anglo-Allied
* Order of battle of the Battle of Quatre Bras
The following units and commanders fought in the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16June 1815 at Quatre Bras in the Belgian province of Wallonia.

Duke of Wellington's Regiment

33rd Regiment of Foot33rd Foot33rd
Kellermann's cuirassiers caught the British 5th Brigade (Halkett) — 33rd ("West Riding", Knight) 69th ("South Lincolnshire", Morice) and the 73rd (Harris) — in line formation.
Having taken part in the action of the previous day, at the Battle of Quatre Bras, they took part in the action at Waterloo; the 33rd was part of the 5th Brigade under the command of Major General Sir Colin Halkett.

Thomas Picton

PictonSir Thomas PictonGeneral Picton
At around 15:00 the 5th British Infantry Division (Picton) and the 3rd Dutch Light Cavalry Brigade (Baron van Merlen) arrived.
On subsequent examination, Picton's body was found to have suffered a serious musket ball wound to the hip at Quatre Bras on the 16th.

Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Duke of BrunswickFrederick WilliamFrederick William of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
The Brunswick Corps, under the Duke of Brunswick, now reached the field, but their commander received a mortal wound while leading a charge and the attack failed.
He was killed by a gunshot at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16 June, the night after he had attended the Duchess of Richmond's ball in Brussels and left it happy to have a chance to show his fighting ability.

Honoré Charles Reille

ReilleHonoré ReilleGeneral Reille
He sent an order to his II Corps (Honoré Reille) to attack with more force.
During the Hundred Days, he rallied to Napoléon and was given command of II Corps, which he led in the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo.

Jean-Baptiste Drouet, Comte d'Erlon

d'ErlonJean-Baptiste DrouetComte d'Erlon
At quarter past the hour Ney heard that the French I Corps (d'Erlon), without his direct order or knowledge, had moved eastwards to assist in the battle of Ligny.
On 16 June 1815 during the first major engagements of Waterloo Campaign, due to conflicting orders his Corps spent the day on the Old Roman Road marching and counter marching between the battles of Quatre Bras and Ligny without engaging in either battle.

69th (South Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot

69th Regiment of Foot69th Foot69th Regiment
Kellermann's cuirassiers caught the British 5th Brigade (Halkett) — 33rd ("West Riding", Knight) 69th ("South Lincolnshire", Morice) and the 73rd (Harris) — in line formation.
It served at the Battle of Quatre Bras and the Battle of Waterloo.

Charles, Count Alten

Charles AltenSir Charles AltenAlten
At 17:00 the timely arrival of the British 3rd Division (Alten), coming in from Nivelles, tipped the numerical balance back in favour of the allies.
Parts of the division were heavily engaged at the Battle of Quatre Bras.