Battle of Quebec (1775)

Battle of QuebecQuebecsiege of Quebecassault on Quebec City1775 Battle of Quebecattempting to captureRelief of Quebecaction at QuebecAmerican attackAmerican invasion
The Battle of Quebec (Bataille de Québec) was fought on December 31, 1775, between American Continental Army forces and the British defenders of Quebec City early in the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
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American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Battle of Quebec (Bataille de Québec) was fought on December 31, 1775, between American Continental Army forces and the British defenders of Quebec City early in the American Revolutionary War. Shortly after the American Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, a small enterprising force led by Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold captured the key Fort Ticonderoga on May 10.
Concurrently, the Americans failed decisively in an attempt to invade Quebec and raise insurrection against the British.

Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester

Guy CarletonSir Guy CarletonLord Dorchester
The city's garrison, a motley assortment of regular troops and militia led by Quebec's provincial governor, General Guy Carleton, suffered a small number of casualties.
He commanded British troops in the American War of Independence, first leading the defence of Quebec during the 1775 rebel invasion and the 1776 counteroffensive that drove the rebels from the province.

Richard Montgomery

MontgomeryGeneral MontgomeryGeneral Richard Montgomery
General Richard Montgomery was killed, Benedict Arnold was wounded, and Daniel Morgan and more than 400 men were taken prisoner. Brigadier General Richard Montgomery led the force from Ticonderoga and Crown Point up Lake Champlain, successfully besieging Fort St. Jean, and capturing Montreal on November 13.
On December 31, he led an attack on the city, but was killed during the battle.

Quebec City

QuebecQuebec City, QuebecQuébec City
The Battle of Quebec (Bataille de Québec) was fought on December 31, 1775, between American Continental Army forces and the British defenders of Quebec City early in the American Revolutionary War. Benedict Arnold, passed over for command of the expedition, convinced General George Washington to authorize a second expedition through the wilderness of what is now the state of Maine directly to Quebec City, capital of the province.
During the American Revolution, revolutionary troops from the southern colonies assaulted the British garrison in an attempt to 'liberate' Quebec City, in a conflict now known as the Battle of Quebec (1775).

Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec

Arnold's expedition to Quebecexpedition to Quebecan expedition
Montgomery's army had captured Montreal on November 13, and early in December they became one force that was led by Arnold, whose men had made an arduous trek through the wilderness of northern New England.
Failing in this, they withdrew to Point-aux-Trembles until Montgomery arrived to lead an unsuccessful attack on the city.

Benedict Arnold

ArnoldBenedictGen. Benedict Arnold
General Richard Montgomery was killed, Benedict Arnold was wounded, and Daniel Morgan and more than 400 men were taken prisoner. Shortly after the American Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, a small enterprising force led by Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold captured the key Fort Ticonderoga on May 10.
He and his men were joined by Richard Montgomery's small army and participated in the December 31 assault on Quebec City in which Montgomery was killed and Arnold's leg was shattered.

Daniel Morgan

Gen. Daniel Morgan
General Richard Montgomery was killed, Benedict Arnold was wounded, and Daniel Morgan and more than 400 men were taken prisoner.
The Battle of Quebec began on the morning of December 31.

Invasion of Quebec (1775)

invasion of Canadainvasion of QuebecInvasion of Canada (1775)
The Continental Army began moving into Quebec in September 1775.
The two forces joined there, but they were defeated at the Battle of Quebec in December 1775.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Benedict Arnold, passed over for command of the expedition, convinced General George Washington to authorize a second expedition through the wilderness of what is now the state of Maine directly to Quebec City, capital of the province.
In June 1775, Congress ordered an invasion of Canada, led by Benedict Arnold, who, despite Washington's strong objection, drew volunteers from the latter's force during the Siege of Boston.

Allan Maclean of Torloisk

Allan MacleanAllen Maclean
The commander of the Royal Highland Emigrants, Allan Maclean, was a Highlander who had fought for the Jacobites in the rebellion of 1745, and turned out to be Carleton's most aggressive subordinate in the campaign of 1775–76. On November 10, Lieutenant Colonel Allen Maclean, who had been involved in an attempt to lift the siege at St. Jean, arrived with 200 men of his Royal Highland Emigrants.
He is best known for leading the 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants) in the Battle of Quebec.

Fort Ticonderoga

TiconderogaFort CarillonFort Ticonderoga Museum
Shortly after the American Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, a small enterprising force led by Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold captured the key Fort Ticonderoga on May 10.
Ticonderoga continued to serve as a staging base for the action in Quebec until the battle and siege at Quebec City that resulted in Montgomery's death.

84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants)

Royal Highland Emigrants84th Regiment of Foot84th Regiment
On November 10, Lieutenant Colonel Allen Maclean, who had been involved in an attempt to lift the siege at St. Jean, arrived with 200 men of his Royal Highland Emigrants.
The regiment was also involved in the Battle of Quebec.

Henry Dearborn

General Henry DearbornDearbornGen. Dearborn
Henry Dearborn, who later became U.S. Secretary of War under President Thomas Jefferson, was present at the battle and wrote his famous journal, The Quebec Expedition, which outlined the long and difficult march to the battle and the events that occurred there.
Along with a number of other officers, Dearborn was captured on December 31, 1775, during the Battle of Quebec, and detained for a year.

John Lamb (general)

John LambGeneral John LambLamb
His force consisted of 300 men from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd New York regiments, a company of artillery raised by John Lamb, about 200 men recruited by James Livingston for the 1st Canadian Regiment, and another 160 men led by Jacob Brown who were remnants of regiments disbanded due to expiring enlistments.
He was commissioned a captain of an artillery company and served under Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold in the Battle of Quebec.

Letters to the inhabitants of Canada

Letter to the Inhabitants of Canadaaddressed the inhabitants of Quebecan open letter to the inhabitants of Canada
As part of an American propaganda offensive, letters from Congress and the New York Provincial Assembly were circulated throughout the province, promising liberation from their oppressive government.
This invasion culminated in the Battle of Quebec at the end of December 1775, in which the city was successfully defended, and the invaders dug in for the winter.

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, Jr.Aaron Burr Jr.Burr, Aaron
The few men of the advance party who survived fled back towards the palisade; only Aaron Burr and a few others escaped unhurt.
Burr distinguished himself during the Battle of Quebec on December 31, 1775, where he attempted to recover Montgomery's corpse after he had been killed.

Moses Hazen

General Hazen
Immediately after the battle, Arnold sent Moses Hazen and Edward Antill to Montreal, where they informed General Wooster of the defeat.
In 1775 he became involved in the American invasion of Quebec early in the American Revolutionary War, and served with the Continental Army, in the 1775 Battle of Quebec.

James Livingston (American Revolution)

James LivingstonCol. James Livingston
His force consisted of 300 men from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd New York regiments, a company of artillery raised by John Lamb, about 200 men recruited by James Livingston for the 1st Canadian Regiment, and another 160 men led by Jacob Brown who were remnants of regiments disbanded due to expiring enlistments.
This regiment then served at the battle of Quebec in December 1775, and the ensuing retreat.

Siege of Fort St. Jean

Battle of Fort St. Jeanbesieging Fort Saint-Jeanbattle of St. Johns
Brigadier General Richard Montgomery led the force from Ticonderoga and Crown Point up Lake Champlain, successfully besieging Fort St. Jean, and capturing Montreal on November 13.
He never found out; the news did not reach the American camp outside Quebec before he died in the December 31 Battle of Quebec.

Battle of Saint-Pierre

These men and more were mobilized to make an attack on an American gun battery at Point Levis, but an advance guard of this Loyalist militia was defeated in the March 1776 Battle of Saint-Pierre by a detachment of pro-American local militia.
This confrontation, which occurred during the Continental Army's siege of Quebec following its defeat at the Battle of Quebec, was between forces that were both largely composed of Canadian militia, including individuals on both sides of the conflict that had been recruited in the same communities.

Hector Theophilus de Cramahé

CramahéHector Cramahé
Lieutenant Governor Hector Cramahé, in charge of Quebec's defenses while Carleton was in Montreal, organized a militia force of several hundred to defend the town in September.
He organised the defence of the city during the Battle of Quebec (1775).

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
These men and more were mobilized to make an attack on an American gun battery at Point Levis, but an advance guard of this Loyalist militia was defeated in the March 1776 Battle of Saint-Pierre by a detachment of pro-American local militia.
Although the Continentals captured Montreal in November 1775, they were turned back a month later at Quebec City by a combination of the British military under Governor Guy Carleton, the difficult terrain and weather, and an indifferent local response.

Edward Antill (soldier)

Edward AntillLt. Colonel Edward Antill
Immediately after the battle, Arnold sent Moses Hazen and Edward Antill to Montreal, where they informed General Wooster of the defeat.
He participated in the Battle of Quebec under General Richard Montgomery, and was present when Montgomery died from wounds received in the battle on December 31, 1775.

Battle of Valcour Island

Valcour IslandLake ChamplainBattle of Valcour
Although he defeated the American fleet in the Battle of Valcour Island and regained control of the lake, the rear guard defense managed by Benedict Arnold prevented further action to capture Ticonderoga or Crown Point in 1776.
The invasion reached a peak on December 31, 1775, when the Battle of Quebec ended in disaster for the Americans.

David Wooster

General WoosterWoosterGeneral [David] Wooster
These were supplemented several days later by a few companies detached by Major General David Wooster, whom Montgomery had left in command at Montreal.
He assumed command of all the forces in Quebec following the death of Montgomery in the Battle of Quebec at the end of December 1775.