Battle of Santiago de Cuba

SantiagoBattle of SantiagoSantiago de CubaBattle of Santiago Bayvictory off Santiagoattackedattempted to escapeBattle of Santiago (1898)Battle of Santiago, Cubabombardment of Santiago
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba was a naval battle that occurred on July 3, 1898, in which the United States Navy decisively defeated Spanish forces, sealing American victory in the Spanish–American War and achieving nominal independence for Cuba from Spanish rule.wikipedia
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Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American War
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba was a naval battle that occurred on July 3, 1898, in which the United States Navy decisively defeated Spanish forces, sealing American victory in the Spanish–American War and achieving nominal independence for Cuba from Spanish rule.
Madrid sued for peace after two Spanish squadrons were sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern, fleet was recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts.

Fernando Villaamil

Fernando Villaamil y Fernández CuetoNautilus
Captain Fernando Villaamil, the Second Officer in the Ministry of the Navy and a pioneer in destroyer warfare, disagreed with Cervera's passivity, advocating instead that Spain offset American naval superiority by scattering the fleet and taking the initiative through quick and dispersed actions.
Fernando Villaamil Fernández-Cueto (November 23, 1845 – July 3, 1898) was a Spanish naval officer, remembered for his internationally recognized professionalism, for being the designer of the first destroyer warship in history and for his death in action during the naval Battle of Santiago de Cuba of the Spanish–American War, being the highest ranking Spanish officer to suffer this fate in that conflict.

Pascual Cervera y Topete

Pascual CerveraAdmiral CerveraCervera
The Spanish government sent their fleet under Admiral Pascual Cervera y Topete to defend Cuba and keep an open line of communication with the Spanish garrison there; Cervera opposed this strategy.
Although he believed that the Spanish Navy was suffering from multiple problems and that there was no chance for victory over the United States Navy, Cervera took command of the squadron and fought in a last stand during the Battle of Santiago de Cuba.

William T. Sampson

William Thomas SampsonAdmiral SampsonW. T. Sampson
The primary elements of the American forces in Cuban waters were initially divided between two commands: Rear Admiral William T. Sampson of the North Atlantic Squadron and Commodore Winfield Scott Schley, commanding the "Flying Squadron".
William Thomas Sampson (February 9, 1840 – May 6, 1902) was a United States Navy rear admiral known for his victory in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish–American War.

William McKinley

McKinleyPresident McKinleyPresident William McKinley
Within this larger context, many American political leaders, pushed by interventionist public opinion, were outraged by the publication of a private letter by the Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lôme critical of President William McKinley and by the destruction of the American battleship, for which a naval court of inquiry and American yellow journalism blamed Spain.
The next day, the Spanish Caribbean squadron, which had been sheltering in Santiago's harbor, broke for the open sea but was intercepted and destroyed by Rear Admiral William T. Sampson's North Atlantic Squadron in the largest naval battle of the war.

Cuban War of Independence

War of IndependenceCuban IndependenceCuban War for Independence
Cuban revolutionaries had staged revolts against Spanish colonial authority in the Ten Years' War (1868–1878), the Little War (1879–1880), and the Cuban War of Independence (1895–1898).
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba on July 3, 1898 was the largest naval engagement during the Spanish–American War, resulting in the destruction of the Spanish Caribbean Squadron (Flota de Ultramar).

George Henry Ellis

The American fleet lost only one killed and one wounded, the former being Yeoman George Henry Ellis of the Brooklyn.
He was killed during the Battle of Santiago de Cuba.

USS Brooklyn (ACR-3)

USS ''BrooklynBrooklynUSS Brooklyn
The American fleet lost only one killed and one wounded, the former being Yeoman George Henry Ellis of the Brooklyn.
In the US Navy, only New York shared this feature, which proved something of a liability in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba, when both ships were operating with the forward engines disconnected and did not have time to reconnect them, thus limiting their speed.

Robley D. Evans

Robley Dunglison EvansRobley EvansRobley "Fighting Bob" Evans
He thanked his rescuers and presented his sword to Captain Robley Evans, who handed it back as an act of chivalry.
During the Spanish–American War, he commanded the battleship in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba.

William Rufus Shafter

William R. ShafterWilliam ShafterShafter
At about 08:45, just as his ships had slipped their moorings, Admiral Sampson and two ships of his command, his flagship, the armored cruiser New York, and the torpedo boat had left their positions for a trip to Siboney and a meeting with Major General William Shafter of the U.S. Army.
With the victory of the U.S. Navy at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba, by Admirals William T. Sampson and Winfield Scott Schley, the fate of the Spanish position at Santiago was sealed.

John Davis Long

John D. LongJohn LongGovernor Long
To bolster this force, Secretary of the Navy John D. Long ordered the battleship to sail from Mare Island, California to join the fleet in the Caribbean.
Second, an inquiry into the actions of Admiral Winfield Scott Schley around the July 1898 Battle of Santiago de Cuba had resulted in a significant amount of criticism of Long's role in the war.

Ramón Blanco, 1st Marquess of Peña Plata

Ramón Blanco y ErenasRamón BlancoRamon Blanco
With Cervera's fleet bottled in Santiago, Captain General Ramon Blanco y Erenas, the top military commander in Cuba, ordered it to sortie from the harbor along the coast westward to Cienfuegos.
He ordered Pascual Cervera y Topete to break the American blockade, leading to the Battle of Santiago de Cuba.

Flying Squadron (United States Navy)

Flying Squadron
The primary elements of the American forces in Cuban waters were initially divided between two commands: Rear Admiral William T. Sampson of the North Atlantic Squadron and Commodore Winfield Scott Schley, commanding the "Flying Squadron".
And, in the end, no raid on the Spanish coast ever took place; Camara was recalled to Spain without reaching the Philippines after the disastrous defeat of Cervera's squadron in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba fifteen days after the Flying Squadron was dissolved.

Winfield Scott Schley

Winfield S. SchleyCommodore SchleyW. S. Schley
The primary elements of the American forces in Cuban waters were initially divided between two commands: Rear Admiral William T. Sampson of the North Atlantic Squadron and Commodore Winfield Scott Schley, commanding the "Flying Squadron".
Winfield Scott Schley (9 October 1839 – 2 October 1911) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy and the hero of the Battle of Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish–American War.

Charles Edgar Clark

Charles E. Clark
And third, on the flagship Brooklyn, Commodore Schley signaled Oregons Captain Charles Edgar Clark to open fire.

Seavey's Island

Fernald's IslandSeaveySeavey Island
Spanish prisoners of war that were not wounded were sent to Seavey's Island at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery Maine, where they were confined at Camp Long from July to September 1898.
In 1908, the Portsmouth Naval Prison was completed on the southern side of Seavey's Island at the former site of Camp Long, a stockade named for Secretary of the Navy John Long, where 1,612 prisoners of war from the Battle of Santiago de Cuba were confined from July 11 to mid-September 1898 during the Spanish–American War.

Santiago de Cuba

SantiagoSantiago, CubaSantiago de Cuba, Cuba

United States Navy

U.S. NavyUS NavyNavy
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba was a naval battle that occurred on July 3, 1898, in which the United States Navy decisively defeated Spanish forces, sealing American victory in the Spanish–American War and achieving nominal independence for Cuba from Spanish rule.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba was a naval battle that occurred on July 3, 1898, in which the United States Navy decisively defeated Spanish forces, sealing American victory in the Spanish–American War and achieving nominal independence for Cuba from Spanish rule.

Enrique Dupuy de Lôme

Within this larger context, many American political leaders, pushed by interventionist public opinion, were outraged by the publication of a private letter by the Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lôme critical of President William McKinley and by the destruction of the American battleship, for which a naval court of inquiry and American yellow journalism blamed Spain.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Within this larger context, many American political leaders, pushed by interventionist public opinion, were outraged by the publication of a private letter by the Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lôme critical of President William McKinley and by the destruction of the American battleship, for which a naval court of inquiry and American yellow journalism blamed Spain.

Battleship

battleshipsdreadnoughtbattle ship
Within this larger context, many American political leaders, pushed by interventionist public opinion, were outraged by the publication of a private letter by the Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lôme critical of President William McKinley and by the destruction of the American battleship, for which a naval court of inquiry and American yellow journalism blamed Spain.

Yellow journalism

yellow pressyellow journalistSensationalist journalism
Within this larger context, many American political leaders, pushed by interventionist public opinion, were outraged by the publication of a private letter by the Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lôme critical of President William McKinley and by the destruction of the American battleship, for which a naval court of inquiry and American yellow journalism blamed Spain.

Ten Years' War

La DemajaguaTen Years War1st War of Independence
Cuban revolutionaries had staged revolts against Spanish colonial authority in the Ten Years' War (1868–1878), the Little War (1879–1880), and the Cuban War of Independence (1895–1898).

Little War (Cuba)

Little WarThe Little War Little War
Cuban revolutionaries had staged revolts against Spanish colonial authority in the Ten Years' War (1868–1878), the Little War (1879–1880), and the Cuban War of Independence (1895–1898).