A report on Japan and Battle of Sekigahara

Edo period screen depicting the battle.
Edo-period screen depicting the Battle of Sekigahara. 160,000 men faced each other on 21 October 1600.
Legendary Emperor Jimmu (神武天皇)
Sekigahara battlefield memorials, in April 2005
Samurai warriors battling Mongols during the Mongol invasions of Japan, depicted in the
Emperor Meiji (明治天皇); 1852–1912
Japan's imperial ambitions ended on September 2, 1945, with the country's surrender to the Allies.
The Japanese archipelago
Mount Fuji in Spring, view from Arakurayama Sengen Park
Autumn maple leaves at Kongōbu-ji on Mount Kōya, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
The National Diet Building
Japan is a member of both the G7 and the G20.
JMSDF class destroyer
The Tokyo Stock Exchange
A rice paddy in Aizu, Fukushima Prefecture
A plug-in hybrid car manufactured by Toyota. Japan is the third-largest maker of motor vehicles in the world.
The Japanese Experiment Module (Kibō) at the International Space Station
Japan Airlines, the flag carrier of Japan
The Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant
The Greater Tokyo Area is ranked as the most populous metropolitan area in the world.
The torii of Itsukushima Shinto Shrine near Hiroshima
Kanji and hiragana signs
Students celebrating after the announcement of the results of the entrance examinations to the University of Tokyo
12th-century illustrated handscroll of The Tale of Genji, a National Treasure
Noh performance at a Shinto shrine
Young ladies celebrate Coming of Age Day (成人の日) in Harajuku, Tokyo
A plate of nigiri-zushi
Sumo wrestlers form around the referee during the ring-entering ceremony
Japanese samurai boarding a Mongol vessel during the Mongol invasions of Japan, depicted in the, 1293
Skyscrapers in Nakanoshima, Osaka; a major financial centre in Japan

The Battle of Sekigahara (Shinjitai: 関ヶ原の戦い; Kyūjitai: 關ヶ原の戰い, Hepburn romanization: Sekigahara no Tatakai) was a decisive battle on October 21, 1600 (Keichō 5, 15th day of the 9th month) in what is now Gifu prefecture, Japan, at the end of the Sengoku period.

- Battle of Sekigahara

When open war broke out, Ieyasu defeated rival clans in the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600.

- Japan

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Tokugawa Ieyasu

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The Tokugawa clan crest
Okazaki Castle, the birthplace of Tokugawa Ieyasu
Ukiyo-e of Tokugawa Ieyasu
An ukiyo-e print depicting the Battle of Batogahara. In his early days as daimyo of Mikawa, Ieyasu had difficult relations with the Jōdō temples which escalated in 1563–1564.
The kabuto (helmet) of Tokugawa Ieyasu.
Armor of Tokugawa Ieyasu at Kunōzan Tōshō-gū
Tokugawa Ieyasu as shōgun
An ukiyo-e by Yoshitoshi depicting the scene when Ieyasu had an audience with Emperor Go-Yōzei.
Edo Castle from a 17th-century painting
William Adams before shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu
Letter from King James VI of Scotland and I of England and Ireland to ogosho Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1613
Grave of Tokugawa Ieyasu in Nikkō Tōshō-gū
The tomb of Tokugawa Ieyasu in Nikkō Tōshō-gū
Handprint of Tokugawa Ieyasu at Kunōzan Tōshō-gū
Precepts on the secret of success in life drafted by Tokugawa Ieyasu from the collection of Nikkō Tōshō-gū.

Tokugawa Ieyasu was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa Shogunate of Japan, which ruled Japan from 1603 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

After Toyotomi's death, Ieyasu seized power in 1600, after the Battle of Sekigahara.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi

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Toyotomi clan Mon
Nakamura Park in Nagoya, traditionally regarded as Hideyoshi's birthplace.
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon No.6, by Yoshitoshi: "Mount Inaba Moon" 1885, 12th month. The young Toyotomi Hideyoshi (then named Kinoshita Tōkichirō) leads a small group assaulting the castle on Mount Inaba
Japan around 1582
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon No.67, by Yoshitoshi:The Moon and Hideyoshi at the Battle of Shizugatake.
Battle standards of Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Hideyoshi promulgated a ban on Christianity in form of the "Bateren-tsuiho-rei" (the Purge Directive Order to the Jesuits) on July 24, 1587
Letter from Duarte de Meneses, Viceroy of Portuguese India, to Hideyoshi dated April 1588, concerning the suppression of Christians, a National Treasure of Japan
Replica of Toyotomi Hideyoshi's armor
Toyotomi Hideyori
The 26 Christian martyrs of Nagasaki, 18–19th century, Choir of La Recoleta, Cuzco
Houkokubyo (Mausoleum of Toyotomi Hideyoshi) Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto
Hideyoshi sitting with his wives and concubines
Hashiba Hidekatsu (Ishimatsumaru)
Tsurumatsu
A replicated Osaka Castle has been created on the site of Hideyoshi's great donjon. The iconic castle has become a symbol of Osaka's re-emergence as a great city after its devastation in World War II.
A replicated Osaka Castle has been created on the site of Hideyoshi's great donjon. The iconic castle has become a symbol of Osaka's re-emergence as a great city after its devastation in World War II.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi (豊臣 秀吉) born as Hiyoshi-maru, later called Kinoshita Tōkichirō and Hashiba Hideyoshi, was a Japanese samurai and daimyo (feudal lord) of the late Sengoku period regarded as the second "Great Unifier" of Japan.

Hideyoshi's young son and successor Toyotomi Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu at the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 which would lead to the founding of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi

Council of Five Elders

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Group of five powerful feudal lords (Japanese: 大名, Daimyō) formed in 1598 by the Regent (Japanese: 太閤 Taikō) Toyotomi Hideyoshi, shortly before his death the same year.

Group of five powerful feudal lords (Japanese: 大名, Daimyō) formed in 1598 by the Regent (Japanese: 太閤 Taikō) Toyotomi Hideyoshi, shortly before his death the same year.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi
The Tokugawa Clan's Crest (Mon)
The Toyotomi Clan's Crest (Mon)
Tokugawa Ieyasu
Ukita Hideie
Maeda Toshiie
Uesugi Kagekatsu
Mōri Terumoto
Kobayakawa Takakage
Toyotomi Hideyoshi

Tokugawa Ieyasu (Japanese: 徳川 家康) was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

He was banished to Hachijō Island after the Battle of Sekigahara.

Tokugawa shogunate

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The mon of the Tokugawa clan. The Tokugawa shogunate (1600-1868) preserved 250 years of peace.
Edo Castle, 17th century
Dutch trading post in Dejima, c. 1805
Sakuradamon Gate of Edo Castle where Ii Naosuke was assassinated in 1860
Samurai of the Shimazu clan

The Tokugawa shogunate (, Japanese 徳川幕府 Tokugawa bakufu), also known as the Edo shogunate (江戸幕府), was the military government of Japan during the Edo period from 1603 to 1868.

The Tokugawa shogunate was established by Tokugawa Ieyasu after victory at the Battle of Sekigahara, ending the civil wars of the Sengoku period following the collapse of the Ashikaga shogunate.

Oda Nobunaga in a 16th-century portrait by Kanō Motohide (detail)

Oda Nobunaga

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Japanese daimyo and one of the leading figures of the Sengoku period.

Japanese daimyo and one of the leading figures of the Sengoku period.

Oda Nobunaga in a 16th-century portrait by Kanō Motohide (detail)
Oda Clan Mon (emblem)
A photocopy of a portrait of Nobunaga allegedly drawn by a missionary. Collection of Sanpoji Temple.
Kiyosu Castle (清州城)
Statue of Oda Nobunaga at Kiyosu Castle.
Ukiyo-e of Oda Nobunaga by Kuniyoshi Utagawa.
Oda Nobunaga's armour.
Battle of Nagashino in 1575
Map of locations
Honnō-ji temple main hall
An ukiyo-e by Yoshitoshi depicting Nobunaga fighting in the Honnō-ji Incident
Grave of Oda Nobunaga at Mount Kōya, Wakayama Prefecture.
Site of Nagoya Castle (那古野城跡).
Political situation in Japan circa 1582. Purple area was territory controlled by the Oda in 1560, grey area was territory Nobunaga controlled at the time of his death in 1582.
Oda Nobunaga's breech-loading swivel gun, 16th century. This gun is thought to have been cast in Portuguese Goa, India. Caliber: 95 mm, length: 2880 mm.
The Swallowtail butterfly mon of the Taira is called Ageha-chō (揚羽蝶) in Japanese.
Azuchi-jō-zu, a drawing of the Azuchi castle
Portrait of Oda Nobunaga in Kobe City Museum, circa 1583

He is regarded as the first "Great Unifier" of Japan.

However, he died in 1598, and Ieyasu took power after the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600, becoming shogun in 1603, and ending the Sengoku period.

Toyotomi Hideyori

Toyotomi Hideyori

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Toyotomi Hideyori
Grave of Toyotomi Clan at Mount Kōya
Marker at the location of suicide of Hideyori and Yodo-dono, Osaka Castle
Portrait of Senhime
Tenshu-ni

Toyotomi Hideyori (豊臣 秀頼) was the son and designated successor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the general who first united all of Japan.

Tokugawa Ieyasu seized control in 1600, after his victory over the others at the Battle of Sekigahara.

The Japanese landing at Busan

Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–1598)

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Initial invasion in 1592 , a brief truce in 1596, and a second invasion in 1597 (Chongyu War).

Initial invasion in 1592 , a brief truce in 1596, and a second invasion in 1597 (Chongyu War).

The Japanese landing at Busan
Daimyo Konishi Yukinaga commanded the Japanese First Division
Daimyo Katō Kiyomasa commanded the Japanese Second Division
Katō Kiyomasa's (1562–1611) banner and battle standard
Japanese infantry employing fusillade tactics using tanegashima matchlocks
Japanese arquebuses of the Edo period were used by Japanese soldiers during Hideyoshi's invasions.
An illustration of an ampulliform Chinese fire-lance with a gunpowder charge shooting a blast of flame with lead pellets as coviative projectiles. The weapon was called the 'phalanx-charging fire-gourd'.
Joseon cannons such as this one were extensively used by the Joseon navy.
Hwacha, Joseon's multiple rocket-powered arrow launcher.
Large iron-tipped wooden arrow fired from Korean cannons.
An old painting of a Korean panokseon.
"Dongnaebu Sunjeoldo", a Korean painting from 1760 depicting the Battle of Dongnae
Map of invasions
Map of Admiral Yi Sun-Shin's Naval Campaigns – 1592
A turtle ship replica at the War Memorial in Seoul. The historical existence of the ironclad roof is disputed.
Yi Sun-sin's crane wing formation, famously used at the Battle of Hansando
Ming Dynasty Wanli Emperor
Ming-era matchlock firearms used in the 15th to 17th centuries
Painting of the Ming Army camped in Ningxia
A naval battle. Close combat was very rare during Admiral Yi Sun-sin's operations.
Korean and Chinese soldiers assault the Japanese-built fortress at Ulsan
Yeosu in 2005. Admiral Yi Sun-sin's headquarters were located here.

This relationship ended in 1408 when Japan, unlike Korea, chose to end its recognition of China's regional hegemony and cancel any further tribute missions.

This got them into a heated debate with other hawkish generals such as Katō Kiyomasa, and these conflicts would eventually have further implications following the war in Japan when the two sides became rivals in the Battle of Sekigahara.