Coin of Harald as the sole Norwegian king, "ARALD[us] REX NAR[vegiae]". Imitation of a type of Edward the Confessor.
Battle of Stamford Bridge, 1870, by Peter Nicolai Arbo
Harald's ancestry according to the younger sagas. Individuals whose existence is disputed by modern historians are in italics.
A 19th-century illustration of the Harald Hardrada saga, Heimskringla.
Near-contemporary depiction of Byzantine Varangian Guardsmen, in an illumination from the Skylitzes Chronicle.
Coin of Sweyn II.
Village monument
Harald's wife Elisiv of Kiev, daughter of Yaroslav the Wise
Sven Estridson coin pendant, found in Mildenhall, Suffolk. British Museum.
Stamford Bridge battlefield memorial near Whiterose Drive
Coin with the legend "MAHNUS ARALD REX". Generally held to date from Magnus and Harald's short co-rule, depicting Magnus who had precedence, but also speculated as Harald's alone, with Magnus an epithet adopted after his death.
Coin of Sven Estridson. British Museum.
Penny minted by Harald, with a triquetra on the obverse, used both by Christians and in Norse paganism. It was used on coins in Denmark by Cnut the Great and his sons, and Harald probably adopted it as part of his claim to the Danish throne.
Harald landing near York (left), and defeating the Northumbrian army (right), from the 13th century chronicle The Life of King Edward the Confessor by Matthew Paris.
Harald at Stamford Bridge. Matthew Paris may have attributed the axe to Harald due to its general Norse association, or the royal iconography around St. Olaf. According to the sagas, Harald wore a blue tunic and helmet, wielded a sword, and Landøyðan as his royal standard, but not his mail-shirt ("Emma") and shield, which was left at Riccall.
The present Klostergata in Trondheim, site of the former Helgeseter Priory

The Battle of Stamford Bridge (Gefeoht æt Stanfordbrycge) took place at the village of Stamford Bridge, East Riding of Yorkshire, in England, on 25 September 1066, between an English army under King Harold Godwinson and an invading Norwegian force led by King Harald Hardrada and the English king's brother Tostig Godwinson.

- Battle of Stamford Bridge

The battle has traditionally been presented as symbolising the end of the Viking Age, although major Scandinavian campaigns in Britain and Ireland occurred in the following decades, such as those of King Sweyn Estrithson of Denmark in 1069–1070 and King Magnus Barefoot of Norway in 1098 and 1102–1103.

- Battle of Stamford Bridge

In 1046, Harald joined forces with Magnus's rival in Denmark (Magnus had also become king of Denmark), the pretender Sweyn II of Denmark, and started raiding the Danish coast.

- Harald Hardrada

The war between Magnus and Sweyn lasted until 1045, when Magnus' uncle Harald Hardrada returned to Norway from exile.

- Sweyn II of Denmark

Although initially successful, Harald was defeated and killed in a surprise attack by Harold Godwinson's forces in the Battle of Stamford Bridge on 25 September 1066, which wiped out almost his entire army.

- Harald Hardrada

Harald then sailed off to England to claim the crown of England, and was killed there.

- Sweyn II of Denmark

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Coin dating to the reign of King Olaf Kyrre.

Olaf III of Norway

0 links

King of Norway (as Olaf III) from 1067 until his death in 1093.

King of Norway (as Olaf III) from 1067 until his death in 1093.

Coin dating to the reign of King Olaf Kyrre.

He was present at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in England in 1066 where his father, King Harald Hardrada, saw defeat and was killed in action, an event that directly preceded his kingship.

The death of Harald Hardrada and the serious defeat suffered by the Norwegians in 1066 tempted the Danish king, Svend Estridsen, to prepare for an attack on Norway.

William as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry during the Battle of Hastings, lifting his helmet to show that he is still alive

William the Conqueror

0 links

William I (c.

William I (c.

William as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry during the Battle of Hastings, lifting his helmet to show that he is still alive
Château de Falaise in Falaise, Lower Normandy, France; William was born in an earlier building here.
Diagram showing William's family relationships. Names with "---" under them were opponents of William, and names with "+++" were supporters of William. Some relatives switched sides over time, and are marked with both symbols.
Column at the site of the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes
Image from the Bayeux Tapestry showing William with his half-brothers. William is in the centre, Odo is on the left with empty hands, and Robert is on the right with a sword in his hand.
The signatures of William I and Matilda are the first two large crosses on the Accord of Winchester from 1072.
Family relationships of the claimants to the English throne in 1066, and others involved in the struggle. Kings of England are shown in bold.
Scene from the Bayeux Tapestry whose text indicates William supplying weapons to Harold during Harold's trip to the continent in 1064
Locations of some of the events in 1066
Scene from the Bayeux Tapestry showing Normans preparing for the invasion of England
Modern-day site of the Battle of Stamford Bridge in the East Riding of Yorkshire
Scene from the Bayeux Tapestry depicting the Battle of Hastings.
The remains of Baile Hill, the second motte-and-bailey castle built by William in York
Norwich Castle. The keep dates to after the Revolt of the Earls, but the castle mound is earlier.
Map showing William's lands in 1087 (the light pink areas were controlled by William)
The White Tower in London, begun by William
English coin of William the Conqueror
A page from the Domesday Book for Warwickshire
William's grave before the high altar in the Abbaye-aux-Hommes, Caen
Statue of William the Conqueror in Falaise, France

King Harald Hardrada of Norway also had a claim to the throne as the uncle and heir of King Magnus I, who had made a pact with Harthacnut in about 1040 that if either Magnus or Harthacnut died without heirs, the other would succeed.

The chronicler also claimed that the duke secured the support of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and King Sweyn II of Denmark.

King Harold received word of their invasion and marched north, defeating the invaders and killing Tostig and Hardrada on 25 September at the Battle of Stamford Bridge.