Battle of Stony Point

Stony Pointrecaptured Stony Pointa raidat Stony Pointattack of the British fort at Stony Pointattack on Stony PointBritish outpostcaptured the outpostretakenstorm Stony Point
The Battle of Stony Point took place on July 16, 1779, during the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
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Anthony Wayne

Mad" Anthony WayneGeneral Anthony WayneMad Anthony Wayne
In a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of George Washington's Continental Army troops under the command of Brigadier General "Mad Anthony" Wayne defeated British troops in a quick and daring assault on their outpost in Stony Point, New York, approximately 30 mi north of New York City.
His reputation suffered due to his defeat in the Battle of Paoli, but he won wide praise for his leadership in the 1779 Battle of Stony Point.

Stony Point, New York

Stony PointTown of Stony PointStony Point, NY
In a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of George Washington's Continental Army troops under the command of Brigadier General "Mad Anthony" Wayne defeated British troops in a quick and daring assault on their outpost in Stony Point, New York, approximately 30 mi north of New York City.
The Stony Point Battlefield, just north of Stony Point, marks the July 16, 1779 Battle of Stony Point in which General "Mad" Anthony Wayne led 1,350 Continental Army troops in a surprise attack just before midnight on July 15 against the 544-man British garrison at Stony Point.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Battle of Stony Point took place on July 16, 1779, during the American Revolutionary War.
In the summer of 1779, the Americans captured British posts at Stony Point and Paulus Hook.

Royal Leicestershire Regiment

Leicestershire Regiment17th Regiment of Foot17th Foot
Stony Point was garrisoned with elements of the 17th Regiment of Foot under the command of Lt. Col. Henry Johnson.
Several companies were captured at the Battle of Stony Point in July 1779 by a daring night-time bayonet charge by "Mad" Anthony Wayne.

Henry Clinton (British Army officer, born 1730)

Henry ClintonSir Henry ClintonGeneral Clinton
British military plans for 1779 were large in ambition, but were ultimately hampered, in the opinion of their North American commander in chief, Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton, by shortages of manpower, and delays in the arrival of manpower that was promised for the campaign.
However, the reinforcements, including Admiral Arbuthnot, were late in arriving, and Stony Point was retaken by the Americans after Clinton weakened its garrison to supply men for the Connecticut raids.

Loyal American Regiment

Loyalist
The 17th was reinforced by a grenadier company belonging to one of the two battalions of the 71st Regiment, and a company-strength detachment of the Loyal American Regiment.
A detachment of the regiment was captured in July 1779 when the fort at Stony Point was taken in the Battle of Stony Point by the Continental Army.

6th Connecticut Regiment

6th Connecticut
The regiment saw action at the siege of Boston, the Battle of Long Island, the New York Campaign, and its colonel and company of light infantry served in the Corps of Light Infantry at the Battle of Stony Point.

Hardy Murfree

Colonel Hardy Murfree
This battalion, commanded by Maj. Hardy Murfree, was instructed to lay down a "gauling fire" with their weapons as a diversionary tactic.
Murfree saw action at the Battle of Monmouth on June 28, 1778, and achieved his greatest renown for leading a successful diversionary attack against British defenses in the Battle of Stony Point on July 15, 1779.

William Hull

Brigadier General William Hull's unsuccessful invasionBrigadier-General William HullGen. Hull
He fought in the battles of White Plains, Trenton, Princeton, Stillwater, Saratoga, Fort Stanwix, Monmouth, and Stony Point.

Tryon's raid

Connecticutraided the Connecticut coasta raiding expedition
While he waited for reinforcements to arrive so that he might march on Middlebrook, Clinton dispatched William Tryon and more than 2,000 troops on a raiding expedition in early July against coastal communities in Connecticut, claiming in retrospect that its purpose was to draw Washington's troops further east.
On the night of July 15–16, a picked force under the command of General Anthony Wayne successfully captured the outpost.

Buckberg

Buckberg Mountain
Washington observed construction of the fortifications through a telescope from atop nearby Buckberg Mountain.
Buckberg is the site of Washington's Lookout, an observation point used by General George Washington and Colonel “Mad” Anthony Wayne to plan a surprise attack on British troops in the Battle of Stony Point.

Stony Point Battlefield

Stony Point Battlefield State Historic SiteStony Point Battlefield ReservationStony Point State Historic Site
The Stony Point State Historic Site preserves the battlefield and has interpretive materials, tours, and demonstrations, primarily during the summer season.
Stony Point Battlefield is the location of the 1779 Battle of Stony Point during the American Revolutionary War.

Christian Febiger

FebigerHans Christian Febiger
He also fought with Major General Nathanael Greene at Germantown on the right wing; he led 4,000 men with two canon at the Battle of Monmouth; and he commanded the right column in the Battle of Stony Point where he distinguished himself by taking the British commander prisoner in person.

Return J. Meigs Sr.

Return Jonathan MeigsReturn J. MeigsReturn J. Meigs, Sr.
When a Corps of Light Infantry was formed under General Anthony Wayne in July 1779, Meigs was given command of its 3rd Regiment, which he led at the Battle of Stony Point.

Battle of Paoli

PaoliPaoli MassacreBritish victory at Willistown
To accomplish this last element, Washington ordered that the men carry unloaded muskets and attack using only bayonets to maintain silence, a tactic often employed by the British army, and had been used to devastating effect against Wayne two years prior at Paoli.
was used by them as a battle cry at Germantown and at Stony Point.

Dunderberg Mountain

DunderbergDunderberg Spiral Railway
The column, often forced to march single file over rough terrain and roads hardly more than paths, took a circuitous route west through Queensboro to the west and over Dunderberg Mountain to avoid detection by the British.
Anthony Wayne, in his successful attack on Stony Point in 1779, used a route that entirely avoids the Dunderberg area, passing nearly two miles to the west of the Timp.

François de Fleury

François-Louis Teissèdre de FleuryFrancois de Fleury
The first man into the British upper works was Lt. Col. Francois de Fleury, an aristocrat French engineer commanding a battalion of the 1st Regiment.
While leading one of the attacking columns at Stony Point in July 1779, Fleury won an award for being the first attacker to enter the British bastion.

Rufus Putnam

As part of the attack on Stony Point, Washington had directed two brigades to begin moving toward Verplanck's, and dispatched Colonel Rufus Putnam with a small force to divert the attention of its British garrison.
In 1779 Putnam served under Major General Anthony Wayne in the Corps of Light Infantry following the capture of Stony Point, commanding the 4th Regiment.

Robert Howe (Continental Army officer)

Robert HoweHowe, Robert, ColColonel Robert Howe
Washington then sent General Robert Howe to lead the two brigades to besiege Verplanck's on the 17th, but the force was not provisioned with adequate artillery or siege equipment, and could do little more than blockade the fort.
On June 18, 1779, shortly after the Battle of Stony Point, Howe was ordered to assist General Israel Putnam in assaulting a British fortification at Verplanck's Point, which sat across the Hudson River from Stony Point.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
In a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of George Washington's Continental Army troops under the command of Brigadier General "Mad Anthony" Wayne defeated British troops in a quick and daring assault on their outpost in Stony Point, New York, approximately 30 mi north of New York City.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
In a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of George Washington's Continental Army troops under the command of Brigadier General "Mad Anthony" Wayne defeated British troops in a quick and daring assault on their outpost in Stony Point, New York, approximately 30 mi north of New York City.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of George Washington's Continental Army troops under the command of Brigadier General "Mad Anthony" Wayne defeated British troops in a quick and daring assault on their outpost in Stony Point, New York, approximately 30 mi north of New York City.

John Burgoyne

BurgoyneGeneral BurgoyneGeneral John Burgoyne
Following the surrender of General John Burgoyne after the Battles of Saratoga in October 1777 and the subsequent entry of France into the war as an American ally, British strategy in dealing with the rebellious Americans was forced to change.

Battles of Saratoga

Battle of SaratogaSaratogaBattle of Bemis Heights
Following the surrender of General John Burgoyne after the Battles of Saratoga in October 1777 and the subsequent entry of France into the war as an American ally, British strategy in dealing with the rebellious Americans was forced to change.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
Following the surrender of General John Burgoyne after the Battles of Saratoga in October 1777 and the subsequent entry of France into the war as an American ally, British strategy in dealing with the rebellious Americans was forced to change.