Battle of Taiyuan

the final defense of Taiyuandefended Taiyuanfall of the city to the invading JapaneseJapanese conquered itpushed forward to TaiyuanTaiyuanTaiyuan Campaign
The Japanese offensive called 太原作戦 or the Battle of Taiyuan was a major battle fought between China and Japan named for Taiyuan (the capital of Shanxi province), which lay in the 2nd Military Region.wikipedia
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Shanxi

Shanxi ProvinceShansiShangxi
The Japanese offensive called 太原作戦 or the Battle of Taiyuan was a major battle fought between China and Japan named for Taiyuan (the capital of Shanxi province), which lay in the 2nd Military Region. This battle concluded in loss for the NRA, including part of Suiyuan, most of Shanxi and their most modern arsenal at Taiyuan and effectively ended large-scale regular resistance in the North China area. In September 1937, Hideki Tojo sent the Japanese army stationed in Chahar to invade Shanxi in order to exploit its resources.
A representative of the Japanese Army, speaking of the final defense of Taiyuan, said that "nowhere in China have the Chinese fought so obstinately".

Taiyuan

JinyangTaiyuan, ChinaTaiyuan Prefecture
The Japanese offensive called 太原作戦 or the Battle of Taiyuan was a major battle fought between China and Japan named for Taiyuan (the capital of Shanxi province), which lay in the 2nd Military Region.
Because Yan succeeded in keeping Shanxi uninvolved in most of the major battles between rival warlords that occurred in China during the 1910s and 1920s, Taiyuan was never taken from Yan by an invading army until the Japanese conquered it in 1937.

Battle of Xinkou

around Xinkoubattles of XinkouNorthern Shanxi
Fighting continued in October in the Battle of Xinkou until the Japanese outflanked Niangziguan in late October, compromising the Chinese defense resulting in the fall of Taiyuan.
The Battle of Xinkou was a decisive engagement of the Taiyuan Campaign, the second of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Order of battle of the Battle of Taiyuan

215th BrigadeJapanese North China Front Army and Chinese 2nd War AreaOrder of Battle Battle of Taiyuan
*Order of battle of the Battle of Taiyuan
Order of battle for the Battle of Taiyuan in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Yan Xishan

Yen Hsi-shanYen Hsi – shan
Yan Xishan also sent troops to reinforce Shijiazhuang, but that caused a lack of personnel to defend the North China area, allowing the Japanese army to break through in the north forcing the Chinese to fall back to a new line at Xinkou.
The defenders at Xinkou, realizing that they were in danger of being outflanked, withdrew southward, past Taiyuan, leaving a small force of 6,000 men to hold off the entire Japanese army.. A representative of the Japanese Army, speaking of the final defense of Taiyuan, said that "nowhere in China have the Chinese fought so obstinately".

5th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

IJA 5th Division5th DivisionFifth Division
Soon afterwards, the division was re-routed to newly formed Japanese Northern China Area Army on 31 August 1937, immediately starting participating in Battle of Taiyuan, where the 3rd battalion of the 21st infantry regiment was ambushed and wiped out in the Battle of Pingxingguan on 24 September 1937.

1st Independent Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

IJA 1st Independent Mixed Brigade1st Independent Mixed Brigade1
The brigade participated in Battle of Taiyuan in late 1937.

20th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

20th DivisionIJA 20th Division20th
The division participated in the Beiping–Hankou Railway Operation and Battle of Taiyuan, but returned to its base at Keijo without having seen significant combat and remained as a reserve and garrison force in Korea throughout the remainder of Second Sino-Japanese War, mainly intended to counter an expected Soviet deep operation advances.

Inner Mongolian Army

Mengjiang National Army9th Mongolian cavalry divisiontroops
Over 20,000 Mongols advanced into the remaining provinces with Japanese support, later being involved in the Battle of Taiyuan.

11th Independent Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

IJA 11th Independent Mixed Brigade11th Independent Mixed Brigade11
This unit was involved in the Operation Chahar and Battle of Taiyuan in 1937, but soon after was recalled to Manchukuo where it was formed into the IJA 26th Division.

List of military regions of the National Revolutionary Army

Military Region5th War AreaWar Area
The Japanese offensive called 太原作戦 or the Battle of Taiyuan was a major battle fought between China and Japan named for Taiyuan (the capital of Shanxi province), which lay in the 2nd Military Region.

National Revolutionary Army

Chinese Nationalist ArmyNationalist ArmyNRA
This battle concluded in loss for the NRA, including part of Suiyuan, most of Shanxi and their most modern arsenal at Taiyuan and effectively ended large-scale regular resistance in the North China area. The city of Datong fell, and the NRA was forced to go on the defensive, and concentrated their troops along the Great Wall in battles at places like Pingxingguan and to the east at in Niangziguan.

Suiyuan

Suiyuan ProvinceJin Sui
This battle concluded in loss for the NRA, including part of Suiyuan, most of Shanxi and their most modern arsenal at Taiyuan and effectively ended large-scale regular resistance in the North China area.

North China

Northern ChinaNorthnorthern
Yan Xishan also sent troops to reinforce Shijiazhuang, but that caused a lack of personnel to defend the North China area, allowing the Japanese army to break through in the north forcing the Chinese to fall back to a new line at Xinkou. This battle concluded in loss for the NRA, including part of Suiyuan, most of Shanxi and their most modern arsenal at Taiyuan and effectively ended large-scale regular resistance in the North China area.

Datong

PingchengDatong CityTatung
With these territories occupied, the Japanese obtained the coal supply in nearby Datong, but it also exposed them to attacks by the guerrilla forces of the Nationalist army including the Eighth Route Army, tying down many Japanese troops which could have been diverted to other campaigns. The city of Datong fell, and the NRA was forced to go on the defensive, and concentrated their troops along the Great Wall in battles at places like Pingxingguan and to the east at in Niangziguan.

Eighth Route Army

8th Route Army18th Army GroupEighth Army
With these territories occupied, the Japanese obtained the coal supply in nearby Datong, but it also exposed them to attacks by the guerrilla forces of the Nationalist army including the Eighth Route Army, tying down many Japanese troops which could have been diverted to other campaigns.

Hideki Tojo

Hideki TōjōTojoTōjō
In September 1937, Hideki Tojo sent the Japanese army stationed in Chahar to invade Shanxi in order to exploit its resources.

Chahar Province

ChaharChakharQahar
In September 1937, Hideki Tojo sent the Japanese army stationed in Chahar to invade Shanxi in order to exploit its resources.

Great Wall of China

Great WallThe Great Wall of ChinaThe Great Wall
The city of Datong fell, and the NRA was forced to go on the defensive, and concentrated their troops along the Great Wall in battles at places like Pingxingguan and to the east at in Niangziguan.

Pingxing Pass

PingxingguanPingxingguan Pass
The city of Datong fell, and the NRA was forced to go on the defensive, and concentrated their troops along the Great Wall in battles at places like Pingxingguan and to the east at in Niangziguan.

Niangzi Pass

NiangziguanLadies Pass
The city of Datong fell, and the NRA was forced to go on the defensive, and concentrated their troops along the Great Wall in battles at places like Pingxingguan and to the east at in Niangziguan.

Shijiazhuang

Shijiazhuang, ChinaShijiazhuang, HebeiShi Jia Zhuang
Yan Xishan also sent troops to reinforce Shijiazhuang, but that caused a lack of personnel to defend the North China area, allowing the Japanese army to break through in the north forcing the Chinese to fall back to a new line at Xinkou.