Battle of the Frontiers

Battle of LorraineBattles of the FrontiersLa Mortagne 19141914 invasion of AlsaceAlsace OffensiveAugust 1914Battle of LongwyBattle of Longwy (1914)frontierthe Frontiers
The Battle of the Frontiers (Slag der Grenzen; Bataille des Frontières; Grenzschlachten) was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War.wikipedia
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First Battle of the Marne

Battle of the MarneMarne 1914Marne
French and British rearguard actions delayed the German advance, allowing the French time to transfer forces on the eastern frontier to the west to defend Paris, resulting in the First Battle of the Marne.
The battle was the culmination of the German advance into France and pursuit of the Allied armies which followed the Battle of the Frontiers in August and had reached the eastern outskirts of Paris.

Plan XVII

Plan 17
The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger.
The plan was implemented from 7 August 1914, with disastrous consequences for the French, who were defeated in the Battle of the Frontiers (7 August – 13 September) at a cost of 329,000 casualties.

Oberste Heeresleitung

German High CommandSupreme Army CommandOHL
Alfred von Schlieffen, Chief of the Imperial German General Staff (Oberste Heeresleitung, OHL) from 1891–1906, devised plans for a decisive battle against the French army in Germany, Belgium or France.
Although the German armies were victorious in the Battle of the Frontiers their advance was brought to a halt at First Battle of the Marne.

British Expeditionary Force (World War I)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFOld Contemptibles
The German concentration on the right (northern) flank, to wheel through Belgium and attack the French in the rear, was delayed by the movement of French Fifth Army (General Charles Lanrezac) towards the north-west to intercept them and the presence of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on his left flank.
The British Army first engaged the German Army in the Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914, which was part of the greater Battle of the Frontiers.

German invasion of Belgium

German invasioninvasion of BelgiumGermany invaded Belgium
German troops crossed the Belgian frontier and attacked Liège.
After the Battle of the Frontiers ended, the French armies and the BEF began the Great Retreat into France (24 August – 28 September), the Belgian army and small detachments of French and British troops fought in Belgium against German cavalry and Jäger.

Joseph Joffre

JoffreGeneral JoffreMarshal Joffre
The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The Battle of the Frontiers (Slag der Grenzen; Bataille des Frontières; Grenzschlachten) was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War.
The initial German advance in the West was very successful: by the end of August the Allied left, which included the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), was in full retreat; French casualties in the first month exceeded 260,000, including 27,000 killed on 22 August during the Battle of the Frontiers.

6th Army (German Empire)

6th Army6 ArmeeGerman 6th Army
Intelligence reports identified a main line of resistance of the German 6th Army and 7th Army, which had been combined under the command of Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria, close to the advanced French troops and that a counter-offensive was imminent.
In August 1914, in the Battle of Lorraine, Rupprecht's 6th Army managed to hold against the French offensive, using a feigned withdrawal to lure the advancing armies onto prepared defensive positions.

Battle of the Trouée de Charmes

Battle of the MortagneLa MortagneTrouée de Charmes
The First Army withdrew but managed to maintain contact with the Second Army and on 24 August, both armies began a counter-offensive at the Battle of the Trouée de Charmes and regained the line of 14 August, by early September.
The Battle of the Trouée de Charmes (Bataille de la trouée de Charmes) or Battle of the Mortagne was fought at the beginning of World War I, between 24 and 26 August 1914 by the French Second Army and the German 6th Army, after the big German victory at the Battle of the Frontiers, earlier in August.

7th Army (German Empire)

7th Army7 Armee7th
Intelligence reports identified a main line of resistance of the German 6th Army and 7th Army, which had been combined under the command of Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria, close to the advanced French troops and that a counter-offensive was imminent.
During the execution of the French Plan XVII, the 7th Army covered Alsace, successfully repulsing the French attack in the Battle of Lorraine.

Battle of Rossignol

battle of Neufchâteau
The Colonial Corps on the left was defeated at the Battle of Rossignol, 15 km south of Neufchâteau and had 11,646 casualties but the 5th Colonial Brigade on the left easily reached Neufchâteau, before it too was repulsed with many casualties.
The Battle of Rossignol was an early battle of the First World War and part of the Battle of the Frontiers between the German and French armies.

4th Army (German Empire)

4th Army4 ArmeeGerman 4th Army
The German 4th Army under Albrecht, Duke of Württemberg and 5th Army of Crown Prince Wilhelm had moved slower than the 1st, 2nd and 3rd armies and the French offensive towards them was reported on 21 August.
The 4th Army defeated Belgian forces on the frontier, drove the French out of the Ardennes and then encountered the British Expeditionary Force in the "Race to the Sea" at the First Battle of Ypres.

Race to the Sea

Race for the SeaadvancingARMENTIERES 1914
Frontal attacks by the Ninth, Fifth and Sixth armies were repulsed on 15–16 September, which led Joffre to begin the transfer of the Second Army west to the left flank of the Sixth Army, the first phase of the Race to the Sea, reciprocal attempts by the contending armies to outflank their opponent, which from 17 September to 17–19 October moved the opposing armies through Picardy and Flanders to the North Sea coast.
The Race to the Sea (Course à la mer; Wettlauf zum Meer, Race naar de Zee) took place from about 1914, after the Battle of the Frontiers and the German advance into France, which had been stopped at the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September) and was followed by the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September), a Franco-British counter-offensive.

Noël Édouard, vicomte de Curières de Castelnau

de CastelnauNoël de CastelnauGeneral de Castelnau
The main French offensive in the south began on 14 August when the First Army advanced with two corps into the Vosges and two corps north-east towards Sarrebourg and the two right-hand corps of the Second Army of General de Castelnau advanced on the left of the First Army.
Under his leadership, in August 1914, the French 2nd Army was decisively routed by the Germans at the Battle of the Frontiers under Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria, with the initial French 2nd Army offensive (along with the French 1st Army) being driven back by the Germans 25 km (16 mi) from the positions where the offensive had initially begun on 14 August.

Battle of Mulhouse

MulhouseBattle of Mulhouse (1914)Battle of Mülhausen
The first French offensive of the war, known as the Battle of Mulhouse, began on 7 August.

Western Front (World War I)

Western FrontFranceFrance and Flanders 1914–18
A series of engagements known as the Battle of the Frontiers ensued, which included the Battle of Charleroi and the Battle of Mons.

Pierre Ruffey

Ruffey
The Fourth Army crossed the Semois and advanced towards Neufchâteau and the Third Army of General Pierre Ruffey attacked towards Arlon, as a right flank guard for the Fourth army.
His army came under heavy German pressure from mid-August, suffering a defeat at the Battle of the Ardennes, a part of the Battle of the Frontiers.

Battle

firefightBattlesskirmishes
The Battle of the Frontiers (Slag der Grenzen; Bataille des Frontières; Grenzschlachten) was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War.

French Third Republic

FranceThird RepublicFrench
The Battle of the Frontiers (Slag der Grenzen; Bataille des Frontières; Grenzschlachten) was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War.

Belgium

BelgianBELKingdom of Belgium
The Battle of the Frontiers (Slag der Grenzen; Bataille des Frontières; Grenzschlachten) was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War.

Military strategy

strategicstrategymilitary strategist
The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger.

German Empire

GermanyGermanImperial Germany
The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger. Alfred von Schlieffen, Chief of the Imperial German General Staff (Oberste Heeresleitung, OHL) from 1891–1906, devised plans for a decisive battle against the French army in Germany, Belgium or France.

Helmuth von Moltke the Younger

Helmuth von MoltkeMoltkeGeneral von Moltke
The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger.

Charles Lanrezac

LanrezacGeneral Charles Lanrezacgénéral Lanrezac
The German concentration on the right (northern) flank, to wheel through Belgium and attack the French in the rear, was delayed by the movement of French Fifth Army (General Charles Lanrezac) towards the north-west to intercept them and the presence of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on his left flank.

Paris

Paris, FranceParísParisian
French and British rearguard actions delayed the German advance, allowing the French time to transfer forces on the eastern frontier to the west to defend Paris, resulting in the First Battle of the Marne.