Battle of the Netherlands

German invasion of the Netherlandsinvasion of the NetherlandsNetherlandsthe Netherlandsinvaded the NetherlandsGerman invasionGermany invaded the NetherlandsinvasionGerman occupation of the Netherlandsinvaded
The Battle of the Netherlands (Slag om Nederland) was a military campaign part of Case Yellow (Fall Gelb), the German invasion of the Low Countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands) and France during World War II. The battle lasted from 10 May 1940 until the surrender of the main Dutch forces on 14 May.wikipedia
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German bombing of Rotterdam

bombing of RotterdamRotterdambombardment of Rotterdam
After the devastating bombing of Rotterdam by the Luftwaffe on 14 May, the Germans threatened to bomb other Dutch cities if the Dutch forces refused to surrender.
The German bombing of Rotterdam, also known as the Rotterdam Blitz, was the aerial bombardment of Rotterdam by the Luftwaffe on 14 May 1940, during the German invasion of the Netherlands in World War II.

Allies of World War II

AlliedAlliesAllied forces
On 9 October, Adolf Hitler ordered plans to be made for an invasion of the Low Countries, to use them as a base against Great Britain and to pre-empt a similar attack by the Allied forces, which could threaten the vital Ruhr Area.
After the start of the German invasion of North Europe until the Balkan Campaign, the Netherlands, Belgium, Greece, and Yugoslavia joined the Allies.

Junkers Ju 87

StukaJu 87Stukas
Germany had a modern army with tanks and dive bombers (such as the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka), while the Netherlands had an army whose armoured forces comprised only 39 armoured cars and five tankettes, and an air force in large part consisting of biplanes.
Stukas were critical to the rapid conquest of Norway, the Netherlands, Belgium and France in 1940.

Netherlands

Dutch🇳🇱the Netherlands
The Battle of the Netherlands (Slag om Nederland) was a military campaign part of Case Yellow (Fall Gelb), the German invasion of the Low Countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands) and France during World War II.
That changed in World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded the Netherlands on 10 May 1940.

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
The Battle of the Netherlands (Slag om Nederland) was a military campaign part of Case Yellow (Fall Gelb), the German invasion of the Low Countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands) and France during World War II.
They quickly conquered Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

M39 Pantserwagen

M39
Another dozen DAF M39 cars were in the process of being taken into service, some still having to be fitted with their main armament.
When the Netherlands were invaded on 10 May 1940, no operational unit had yet been equipped with the type.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The Battle of the Netherlands (Slag om Nederland) was a military campaign part of Case Yellow (Fall Gelb), the German invasion of the Low Countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands) and France during World War II.
To circumvent the strong Maginot Line fortifications on the Franco-German border, Germany directed its attack at the neutral nations of Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg.

Royal Netherlands Air Force

DutchAir ForceRNLAF
The Dutch air force, which was not an independent arm of the Dutch armed forces, but part of the Army, on 10 May operated a fleet of 155 aircraft: 28 Fokker G.1 twin-engine destroyers; 31 Fokker D.XXI and seven Fokker D.XVII fighters; ten twin-engined Fokker T.V, fifteen Fokker C.X and 35 Fokker C.V light bombers, twelve Douglas DB-8 dive bombers (used as fighters) and seventeen Koolhoven FK-51 reconnaissance aircraft—thus 74 of the 155 aircraft were biplanes.
In May 1940 the III Reich invaded the Netherlands.

Design 1047 battlecruiser

Design 1047a planbattlecruiser
Moreover, a considerable part of the funds were intended for the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia), much of it related to a plan to build three battlecruisers.
This is the last known design produced prior to Germany's invasion and occupation of the Netherlands.

Philips

Philips ElectronicsPhillipsRoyal Philips Electronics
Despite the Netherlands being the seat of Philips, one of Europe's largest producers of radio equipment, the Dutch army mostly used telephone connections; only the Artillery had been equipped with the modest number of 225 radio sets.
On 9 May 1940, the Philips directors learned that the German invasion of the Netherlands was to take place the following day.

Hendrikus Colijn

ColijnHendrik ColijnH. Colijn
Hendrikus Colijn, prime minister between 1933 and 1939, was personally convinced Germany would not violate Dutch neutrality; senior officers made no effort to mobilise public opinion in favour of improving military defence.
After the Dutch defeat in the Battle of the Netherlands in 1940, he published an essay entitled "On the Border of Two Worlds", in which he called for accepting German leadership in Europe, immediately after the Royal House had fled to England, leaving him behind.

Fokker T.V

Fokker T-5
The Dutch air force, which was not an independent arm of the Dutch armed forces, but part of the Army, on 10 May operated a fleet of 155 aircraft: 28 Fokker G.1 twin-engine destroyers; 31 Fokker D.XXI and seven Fokker D.XVII fighters; ten twin-engined Fokker T.V, fifteen Fokker C.X and 35 Fokker C.V light bombers, twelve Douglas DB-8 dive bombers (used as fighters) and seventeen Koolhoven FK-51 reconnaissance aircraft—thus 74 of the 155 aircraft were biplanes.
It was modern for its time, but by the German invasion of 1940, it was outclassed by the airplanes of the Luftwaffe.

Wilhelmina of the Netherlands

Queen WilhelminaWilhelminaQueen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands
The Dutch government never officially formulated a policy on how to act in case of either contingency; the majority of ministers preferred to resist an attack, a minority and Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands refused to become a German ally whatever the circumstances.
On 10 May 1940, Germany invaded the Netherlands.

Wehrmacht

German ArmyGermanGerman forces
Dutch troops in the province of Zeeland continued to resist the Wehrmacht until 17 May when Germany completed its occupation of the whole country.
Battle of the Netherlands – 10 to 17 May 1940

Koolhoven

N.V. Koolhoven VliegtuigenF.K.59Frederick Koolhoven
The production potential of the Dutch military aircraft industry, consisting of Fokker and Koolhoven, was not fully exploited due to budget limitations.
As a prelude to the German invasion of the Netherlands, the Luftwaffe set out to destroy as much as possible of the Dutch Air Force on the ground.

Kornwerderzand

Fort Kornwerderzand
Modern large fortresses like the Belgian stronghold of Eben Emael were nonexistent; the only modern fortification complex was that at Kornwerderzand, guarding the Afsluitdijk.
Since North Holland was part of Vesting Holland ("Fortress Holland"), the national redoubt of the Netherlands at the time, and control of the sluices in the Afsluitdijk was necessary for planned defensive inundations in case of a military invasion, Kornwerderzand was considered strategically important by the Dutch government.

Northrop A-17

B 5A-17 NomadA-17
The Dutch air force, which was not an independent arm of the Dutch armed forces, but part of the Army, on 10 May operated a fleet of 155 aircraft: 28 Fokker G.1 twin-engine destroyers; 31 Fokker D.XXI and seven Fokker D.XVII fighters; ten twin-engined Fokker T.V, fifteen Fokker C.X and 35 Fokker C.V light bombers, twelve Douglas DB-8 dive bombers (used as fighters) and seventeen Koolhoven FK-51 reconnaissance aircraft—thus 74 of the 155 aircraft were biplanes.
Used in a fighter role for which they were unsuited, the majority were destroyed by Luftwaffe attacks on 10 May 1940, the first day of the German invasion.

18th Army (Wehrmacht)

18th ArmyEighteenth Army18. Armee
In addition to the Dutch Army and the German 18th Army, a third force, not all that much smaller than either, would operate on Dutch soil: the French 7th Army.
Formed in November 1939 in Military Region (Wehrkreis) VI, the 18th Army was part of the offensive into the Netherlands (Battle of the Netherlands) and Belgium (Battle of Belgium) during Fall Gelb and later moved into France in 1940.

List of Dutch military equipment of World War II

a minesweeper of the Royal Netherlands Navylist of Dutch armour
A single platoon of five Carden-Loyd Mark VI tankettes used by the Artillery completed the list of Dutch armour.
Carden Loyd Mk IV tankette - 5 tankettes used in Battle of the Netherlands

Airborne forces

airborneairborne troopsairborne infantry
After the German attack on Denmark and Norway in April 1940, when the Germans used large numbers of airborne troops, the Dutch command became worried about the possibility they too could become the victim of such a strategic assault.
During the invasion of the Netherlands, the Germans threw into battle almost their entire Luftlandekorps, an airborne assault army corps that consisted of one parachute division and one division of airlanding troops plus the necessary transport capacity.

22nd Air Landing Division (Wehrmacht)

22nd Infantry Division22nd Air Landing Division22nd Air Landing Infantry Division
The first of these, the 7. Flieger-Division, consisted of paratroopers; the second, the 22nd Luftlande-Infanteriedivision, of airborne infantry.
The division retrained as 22. Luftlande-Division (Air Landing Division) for rapid tactical deployment to captured enemy airbases and performed in that role during the invasion of the Netherlands suffering heavy losses, and afterward advanced into France operating as ordinary ground infantry.

Phoney War

phony warDrĂ´le de Guerre3 September 1939 to 9 May 1940
The United Kingdom and France declared war on Germany in 1939, following the German invasion of Poland, but no major land operations occurred in Western Europe during the period known as the Phoney War in the winter of 1939–1940.
On 10 May 1940, eight months after Britain and France had declared war on Germany, German troops marched into Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, marking the end of the Phoney War.

Battle of Belgium

BelgiumGerman invasion of BelgiumGerman invasion
Germany had commenced operation Fall Gelb and attacked the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Luxembourg, in the case of the Low Countries without a declaration of war given before hostilities; France was already at war.
On 10 May 1940, Germany invaded Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Belgium under the operational plan Fall Gelb (Case Yellow).

Arnhem

Arnhem, NetherlandsSchaarsbergenArnheim
He proposed a shift to a more mobile strategy by fighting a delaying battle at the plausible crossing sites near Arnhem and Gennep to force the German divisions to spend much of their offensive power before they had reached the MDL, and ideally even defeat them.
The Dutch Army destroyed the first bridge when the German Army invaded the Netherlands in 1940.

Venlo

VenloSteylthe Dutch border
In the version of 29 October it was proposed to limit the transgression to a line south of Venlo.
The incident was used by the Nazis to link Great Britain to Georg Elser's failed assassination of Hitler at the Bürgerbräukeller the day before and to justify their later invasion of the Netherlands, a neutral country, on 10 May 1940.