Bavaria

BayernFree State of BavariaBavarianBavaria, GermanyState of BavariaBYcitiesBavaria (Bayern)Bavarian folkloreBavarian government
Bavaria (German and Bavarian: Bayern ), officially the Free State of Bavaria (German and Bavarian: Freistaat Bayern ), is a landlocked federal state of Germany, occupying its southeastern corner.wikipedia
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Munich

Munich, GermanyMünchenMunich, West Germany
Bavaria's main cities are Munich (its capital and largest city and also the third largest city in Germany ), Nuremberg and Augsburg.
Munich (München ; Minga ; Monachium) is the capital and most populous city of Bavaria, the second most populous German federal state.

History of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianBavarian history
The history of Bavaria includes its earliest settlement by Iron Age Celtic tribes, followed by the conquests of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC, when the territory was incorporated into the provinces of Raetia and Noricum.
The history of Bavaria stretches from its earliest settlement and its formation as a stem duchy in the 6th century through its inclusion in the Holy Roman Empire to its status as an independent kingdom and finally as a large Bundesland (state) of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Nuremberg

NürnbergNuremberg, GermanyNüremberg
Bavaria's main cities are Munich (its capital and largest city and also the third largest city in Germany ), Nuremberg and Augsburg.
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.

States of Germany

stateGerman statefederal state
Bavaria (German and Bavarian: Bayern ), officially the Free State of Bavaria (German and Bavarian: Freistaat Bayern ), is a landlocked federal state of Germany, occupying its southeastern corner.
Initially, in 1949, the states of the Federal Republic were Baden (until 1952), Bavaria (in German: Bayern), Bremen, Hamburg, Hesse (Hessen), Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen), Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz), Schleswig-Holstein, Württemberg-Baden (until 1952), and Württemberg-Hohenzollern (until 1952).

Bavarian cuisine

BavariaBavarianBavarian fare
Bavarians have traditionally been proud of their culture, which includes a language, cuisine, architecture, festivals such as Oktoberfest and elements of Alpine symbolism.
Bavarian cuisine is a style of cooking from Bavaria, Germany.

Franconia

FranconiansFrankenFranconian
Modern Bavaria also includes parts of the historical regions of Franconia and Swabia.
"Core Franconia" is constituted by the three administrative regions of Lower, Middle, and Upper Franconia (largest cities: Würzburg, Nuremberg, and Bamberg, respectively) of the state of Bavaria.

Oktoberfest

OctoberfestMunich Oktoberfestcelebration of the same name
Bavarians have traditionally been proud of their culture, which includes a language, cuisine, architecture, festivals such as Oktoberfest and elements of Alpine symbolism.
Held annually in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, it is a 16- to 18-day folk festival running from mid or late September to the first Sunday in October, with more than six million people from around the world attending the event every year.

Kingdom of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianKing of Bavaria
The Kingdom of Bavaria existed from 1806 to 1918, when Bavaria became a republic.
In 1918, Bavaria became a republic, and the kingdom was thus succeeded by the current Free State of Bavaria.

Bavarians

BavariiBavarianBaiuvarii
Bavarians have traditionally been proud of their culture, which includes a language, cuisine, architecture, festivals such as Oktoberfest and elements of Alpine symbolism.
Bavarians (Bavarian: Boarn, Standard German: Bayern) are an ethnographic group of Germans of the Bavaria region, a state within Germany.

Swabia

SchwabenSwabianSuabia
Modern Bavaria also includes parts of the historical regions of Franconia and Swabia.
Swabia as understood in modern ethnography roughly coincides with the Swabian Circle of the Holy Roman Empire as it stood during the Early Modern period, now divided between the states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg.

Raetia

RhaetiaRaetia primaCount of Raetia
The history of Bavaria includes its earliest settlement by Iron Age Celtic tribes, followed by the conquests of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC, when the territory was incorporated into the provinces of Raetia and Noricum.
It thus comprised the districts occupied in modern times by eastern and central Switzerland (containing the Upper Rhine and Lake Constance), southern Germany (Bavaria and most of Baden-Württemberg), Vorarlberg and the greater part of Tyrol in Austria, and part of northern Lombardy in Italy.

Boii

BoianCeltsCeltic
These peoples may have included the Celtic Boii, some remaining Romans, Marcomanni, Allemanni, Quadi, Thuringians, Goths, Scirians, Rugians, Heruli.
The Boii (Latin plural, singular Boius; ) were a Gallic tribe of the later Iron Age, attested at various times in Cisalpine Gaul (northern Italy), Pannonia (Hungary), parts of Bavaria, in and around Bohemia (after whom the region is named in most languages; comprising the bulk of the Czech Republic), parts of Poland, and Gallia Narbonensis.

Duchy of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianDukes of Bavaria
The Duchy of Bavaria dates back to the year 555.
It included the Altbayern regions of the modern state of Bavaria, with the lands of the Nordgau march (the later Upper Palatinate), but without its Swabian and Franconian regions.

Alps

AlpineItalian Alpsthe Alps
Bavarians have traditionally been proud of their culture, which includes a language, cuisine, architecture, festivals such as Oktoberfest and elements of Alpine symbolism.
To the south it dips into northern Italy and to the north extends to the southern border of Bavaria in Germany.

Augsburg

Augsburg, GermanyAugusta VindelicorumAugsberg
Bavaria's main cities are Munich (its capital and largest city and also the third largest city in Germany ), Nuremberg and Augsburg.
Augsburg (,, ; Augschburg) is a city in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany.

Babenberg

House of BabenbergBabenbergerBabenbergs
The territory of Ostarrichi was elevated to a duchy in its own right and given to the Babenberger family.
Originally from Bamberg in the Duchy of Franconia (present-day Bavaria), the Babenbergs ruled the Imperial Margraviate of Austria from its creation in 976 AD until its elevation to a duchy in 1156, and from then until the extinction of the line in 1246, whereafter they were succeeded by the House of Habsburg.

Saxony

Free State of SaxonySaxonSachsen
When in 1180, Henry the Lion was deposed as Duke of Saxony and Bavaria by his cousin, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor (a.k.a. "Barbarossa" for his red beard), Bavaria was awarded as fief to the Wittelsbach family, counts palatinate of Schyren ("Scheyern" in modern German).
Saxony (Sachsen ; ; Sasko; Saksonia), officially the Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen, Upper Sorbian: Swobodny stat Sakska), is a landlocked federal state of Germany, bordering the federal states of Brandenburg, Saxony Anhalt, Thuringia, and Bavaria, as well as the countries of Poland (Lower Silesian and Lubusz Voivodeships) and the Czech Republic (Karlovy Vary, Liberec, and Ústí nad Labem Regions).

House of Wittelsbach

WittelsbachWittelsbach dynastyWittelsbachs
When in 1180, Henry the Lion was deposed as Duke of Saxony and Bavaria by his cousin, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor (a.k.a. "Barbarossa" for his red beard), Bavaria was awarded as fief to the Wittelsbach family, counts palatinate of Schyren ("Scheyern" in modern German).
The House of Wittelsbach is a European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria.

Upper Palatinate

Upper PalatineOberpfalzFutsal-Bezirksliga
Emperor Louis the Bavarian acquired Brandenburg, Tyrol, Holland and Hainaut for his House but released the Upper Palatinate for the Palatinate branch of the Wittelsbach in 1329.
The Upper Palatinate (Oberpfalz, Obapfoiz, Owerpfolz) is one of the seven administrative districts of Bavaria, Germany, located in the east of Bavaria.

Hugbert of Bavaria

Hugbert
At Theodo's death the duchy was divided among his sons, but reunited under his grandson Hugbert.
Hugbert (also Hukbert) of the Agilolfings was duke of Bavaria from 725 to 736.

House of Welf

WelfHouse of GuelphWelfs
The last, and one of the most important, of the dukes of Bavaria was Henry the Lion of the house of Welf, founder of Munich, and de facto the second most powerful man in the empire as the ruler of two duchies.
In 1070, Welf IV became duke of Bavaria.

Grand Duchy of Baden

BadenBaden, GermanyDuchy of Baden
Its area doubled after the Duchy of Jülich was ceded to France, as the Electoral Palatinate was divided between France and the Grand Duchy of Baden.
Baden was bordered to the north by the Kingdom of Bavaria and the Grand Duchy of Hessen-Darmstadt; to the west, along most of its length, by the river Rhine, which separated Baden from the Bavarian Rhenish Palatinate and Alsace in modern France; to the south by Switzerland; and to the east by the Kingdom of Württemberg, the Principality of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and Bavaria.

Salzburg (state)

SalzburgSalzburgerlandState of Salzburg
Tyrol and Salzburg were temporarily reunited with Bavaria but finally ceded to Austria by the Congress of Vienna.
It is located in the north of the country, close to the border with the German state of Bavaria.

Maximilian von Montgelas

MontgelasCount Maximilian Joseph von MontgelasCount Max Josef von Montgelas
Between 1799 and 1817, the leading minister, Count Montgelas, followed a strict policy of modernisation; he laid the foundations of administrative structures that survived the monarchy and retain core validity in the 21st century.
Maximilian Karl Joseph Franz de Paula Hieronymus de Garnerin de la Thuille, Count von Montgelas (Maximilian Karl Joseph Franz de Paula Hieronymus de Garnerin de la Thuille Graf von Montgelas; 12 September 1759 Munich – 14 June 1838 Munich) was a Bavarian statesman, a member of a noble family from the Duchy of Savoy.

Theodelinda

TheodolindaTheudelindaTheodelinda of Bavaria
Their daughter, Theodelinde, became Queen of the Lombards in northern Italy and Garibald was forced to flee to her when he fell out with his Frankish overlords.
Theodelinda, (also spelled Theudelinde) queen of the Lombards, ( 570–628 AD) was the daughter of duke Garibald I of Bavaria and Walderada.