Bea Arthur

Beatrice ArthurBea Arthur on Broadway, Just Between FriendsBeau Arthur
Beatrice Arthur (born Bernice Frankel; May 13, 1922 – April 25, 2009) was an American actress, comedian, and animal rights activist.wikipedia
450 Related Articles

Maude (TV series)

MaudeMaude'' (TV series)Vivian
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988.
Maude stars Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay, an outspoken, middle-aged, politically liberal woman living in suburban Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York, with her fourth husband, household appliance store owner Walter Findlay (Bill Macy).

The Golden Girls

Golden GirlsAltın KızlarBrighton Belles
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988. In 1985, Arthur was cast in The Golden Girls, in which she played Dorothy Zbornak, a divorced substitute teacher living in a Miami house owned by widow Blanche Devereaux (Rue McClanahan).
The show stars Bea Arthur, Betty White, Rue McClanahan, and Estelle Getty as four older women who share a home in Miami, Florida.

Dorothy Zbornak

DorothyDorothy Zbornak (née Petrillo)
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988. In 1985, Arthur was cast in The Golden Girls, in which she played Dorothy Zbornak, a divorced substitute teacher living in a Miami house owned by widow Blanche Devereaux (Rue McClanahan).
Dorothy Zbornak (née Petrillo) is a fictional character from the TV series The Golden Girls, portrayed by Beatrice Arthur for seven years and 180 episodes.

Maude Findlay

Maude
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988. In 1971, Arthur was invited by Norman Lear to guest-star on his sitcom All in the Family, as Maude Findlay, the cousin of Edith Bunker.
She was portrayed by the Emmy-winning actress Bea Arthur.

Mame (musical)

MameAuntie MameMame'' (musical)
She won the 1966 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for playing Vera Charles in Mame.
The musical opened on Broadway in 1966, starring Angela Lansbury and Bea Arthur.

Mame (film)

Mame1974 film1974 screen adaptation
Her film appearances included Lovers and Other Strangers (1970) and Mame (1974).
The cast also stars Bea Arthur, Bruce Davison, and Robert Preston.

Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical

Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a MusicalBest Featured Actress in a MusicalTony Award
She won the 1966 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for playing Vera Charles in Mame.

Lovers and Other Strangers

film
Her film appearances included Lovers and Other Strangers (1970) and Mame (1974). She portrayed overbearing mother Bea Vecchio in Lovers and Other Strangers (1970), and had a cameo as a Roman unemployment clerk in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981).
The cast includes Richard S. Castellano, Gig Young, Cloris Leachman, Anne Jackson, Beatrice Arthur, Bonnie Bedelia, Michael Brandon, Harry Guardino, Anne Meara, Bob Dishy, Marian Hailey, Joseph Hindy, and, in her film debut, Diane Keaton.

Adrienne Barbeau

The show, debuting in 1972, found her living in the affluent community of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York, with her fourth husband Walter (Bill Macy) and divorced daughter Carol (Adrienne Barbeau).
Barbeau came to prominence in the 1970s as Broadway's original Rizzo in the musical Grease, and as Carol Traynor, the divorced daughter of Maude Findlay (played by Beatrice Arthur) on the sitcom Maude (1972–1978).

All in the Family

Archie Bunker's PlaceArchie Bunker's chairAll in the Family - Fan Favorites
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988. In 1971, Arthur was invited by Norman Lear to guest-star on his sitcom All in the Family, as Maude Findlay, the cousin of Edith Bunker.
Bea Arthur as Edith's cousin Maude: Maude was white-collared and ultra-liberal, the perfect foil to Archie, and one of his main antagonists. She appeared in only two episodes, "Cousin Maude's Visit", where she took care of the Bunker household when all four were sick, and "Maude" from the show's second season, which was basically a backdoor pilot. Her spin-off series, Maude, began in fall 1972. (Season 2, 2 episodes)

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy SeriesEmmy AwardEmmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
She went on to play Maude Findlay on the 1970s sitcoms All in the Family (1971–72) and Maude (1972–78), and Dorothy Zbornak on the 1980s sitcom The Golden Girls (1985–92), winning Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1977 and 1988.
Bea Arthur (2 different roles)

Fiddler on the Roof

AnatevkaBroadway musicalBroadway musical of the same name
On stage, her roles included Lucy Brown in the 1954 Off-Broadway premiere of Marc Blitzstein's English-language adaptation of Kurt Weill's The Threepenny Opera, Nadine Fesser in the 1957 premiere of Herman Wouk's Nature's Way at the Coronet Theatre, Yente the Matchmaker in the 1964 premiere of Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway.
The cast included Zero Mostel as Tevye the milkman, Maria Karnilova as his wife Golde (each of whom won a Tony for their performances), Beatrice Arthur as Yente the matchmaker, Austin Pendleton as Motel, Bert Convy as Perchik the student revolutionary, Gino Conforti as the fiddler, and Julia Migenes as Hodel.

The New School

New School for Social ResearchNew SchoolThe New School for Social Research
After interning at a local hospital for the summer, Frankel decided against working as a lab technician, departing for New York City in 1947 to enroll in the School of Drama at The New School. From 1947, Arthur studied at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York, N.Y. with German director Erwin Piscator.
Among the famous students of the Dramatic Workshop were Beatrice Arthur, Harry Belafonte, Marlon Brando, Tony Curtis, Ben Gazzara, Michael V. Gazzo, Rod Steiger, Elaine Stritch, Shelley Winters and Tennessee Williams.

Bill Macy

The show, debuting in 1972, found her living in the affluent community of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York, with her fourth husband Walter (Bill Macy) and divorced daughter Carol (Adrienne Barbeau).
Macy played Walter Findlay, the long-suffering husband of the title character on the 1970s television situation comedy Maude, starring Beatrice Arthur.

Dramatic Workshop

Dramatic Workshop and Technical InstituteWorkshop
From 1947, Arthur studied at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York, N.Y. with German director Erwin Piscator.
Among the students of the Dramatic Workshop were Frank Aletter, Bea Arthur, Harry Belafonte, Alicia Bibiloni, Gene Saks, Marlon Brando, Tony Curtis, Jack Garfein, Walter Matthau, Judith Malina, Deirdre O'Connell, Rod Steiger, Elaine Stritch, Jack Creley, and Tennessee Williams.

The Beatrice Arthur Special

She hosted The Beatrice Arthur Special on CBS on January 19, 1980, which paired the star in a musical comedy revue with Rock Hudson, Melba Moore and Wayland Flowers and Madame.
The Beatrice Arthur Special is a 1980 American comedy-variety television special hosted by and starring Beatrice Arthur in her first prime time special.

Edith Bunker

EdithEdith "Dingbat" Bunker
In 1971, Arthur was invited by Norman Lear to guest-star on his sitcom All in the Family, as Maude Findlay, the cousin of Edith Bunker.
Her cousin was Maude Findlay (Beatrice Arthur) who was one of Archie's nemeses.

Amanda's

Arthur returned to television in the short-lived 1983 sitcom Amanda's (an adaptation of the British series Fawlty Towers). Unfortunately, the show was a not a hit with audiences and only 10 of the 13 filmed episodes actually aired.
The series starred Bea Arthur as the main character, Amanda Cartwright, who owns a seaside hotel called "Amanda's By The Sea" and was Arthur's first return to series television since her sitcom Maude ended in 1978.

Star Wars Holiday Special

Holiday SpecialThe Star Wars Holiday SpecialStar Wars Holiday Special, The
Later the same year (1978), she costarred in Star Wars Holiday Special, in which she had a song and dance routine in the Mos Eisley cantina.
The video is announced as required viewing for all Imperial forces and much of it features Ackmena (Bea Arthur) running the Mos Eisley cantina.

Blanche Devereaux

Blanche
In 1985, Arthur was cast in The Golden Girls, in which she played Dorothy Zbornak, a divorced substitute teacher living in a Miami house owned by widow Blanche Devereaux (Rue McClanahan).
McClanahan had previously been a co-star with Beatrice Arthur in Maude and with Betty White in the first two seasons of Mama's Family.

Rue McClanahan

In 1985, Arthur was cast in The Golden Girls, in which she played Dorothy Zbornak, a divorced substitute teacher living in a Miami house owned by widow Blanche Devereaux (Rue McClanahan).
McClanahan first worked with actress Beatrice Arthur on the sitcom, Maude (1972–78).

Blackstone, Virginia

BlackstoneBlacks & WhitesBlackstone, Va
Afterwards she studied for a year at Blackstone College for Girls in Blackstone, Virginia.
Actress Bea Arthur attended Blackstone School for Girls and was active in their Drama program in 1933.

History of the World, Part I

History of the World: Part ISpanish Inquisition segment
She portrayed overbearing mother Bea Vecchio in Lovers and Other Strangers (1970), and had a cameo as a Roman unemployment clerk in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981).
The film also has cameo appearances by Royce D. Applegate, Beatrice Arthur, Hugh Hefner, John Hurt, Phil Leeds, Barry Levinson, Jackie Mason, Paul Mazursky, Andrew Sachs and Henny Youngman, among others.

The Golden Palace

Arthur decided to leave the show after seven years, and in 1992 the show was moved from NBC to CBS and retooled as The Golden Palace in which the other three actresses reprised their roles, with Cheech Marin as their new foil.
Bea Arthur also reprised her Dorothy Zbornak role for a two-part storyline in which she visits the hotel to check up on her mother.

La fille du régiment

The Daughter of the RegimentLa figlia del reggimentoMarie
She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in 1994 portraying the Duchess of Krakenthorp, a speaking role, in Gaetano Donizetti's La fille du régiment.
As a non-singing role, the Duchess of Crakenthorp is often played by non-operatic celebrities, who have included actresses such as Dawn French, Bea Arthur, and Hermione Gingold, as well as retired opera greats such as Kiri Te Kanawa and Montserrat Caballé.