Bea Benaderet

Bea Benederet
Beatrice Benaderet (April 4, 1906 – October 13, 1968) was an American radio and television actress and voice actress.wikipedia
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Petticoat Junction

Bobbie Jo BradleyBillie Jo BradleyBetty Jo Bradley
In the 1960s, she had regular roles in four series up until her death from lung cancer in 1968, including the commercial successes The Beverly Hillbillies, The Flintstones, and her best known role as Kate Bradley in Petticoat Junction. He asked afterwards what part they preferred; Vander Pyl recalled in 1994: "I said, 'Oh, I want to be Wilma!' [and] Bea said, 'That's fine with me. Benaderet adapted her Burns & Allen laugh for Betty's signature giggle, and she voiced guest spots on the side for fellow Hanna-Barbera productions Top Cat, The Yogi Bear Show, and The Jetsons during 1961 and 1962. While filming the debut season of her show Petticoat Junction the next year, she continued voicing Betty by recording with her Flintstones castmates during evening hours, but scheduling conflicts forced her to drop the role at the end of the fourth season in 1964, and she was replaced by Gerry Johnson.
Widowed Kate Bradley (Bea Benaderet) is the proprietor.

The Beverly Hillbillies

Jed ClampettJethro BodineElly May Clampett
In the 1960s, she had regular roles in four series up until her death from lung cancer in 1968, including the commercial successes The Beverly Hillbillies, The Flintstones, and her best known role as Kate Bradley in Petticoat Junction.

The Flintstones

FlintstonesFlintstoneHoppy
In the 1960s, she had regular roles in four series up until her death from lung cancer in 1968, including the commercial successes The Beverly Hillbillies, The Flintstones, and her best known role as Kate Bradley in Petticoat Junction.

I Love Lucy

colorizations of ''I Love Lucycolorized a number of episodesI Love Laquita
Initially seeking work as a dramatic actress, she switched to comedy and performed on multiple shows in nine years with the station, in particular the Blue Monday Jamboree variety program, where her castmates included Meredith Willson, Elvia Allman, and future I Love Lucy producer Jess Oppenheimer.
Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet, supporting cast members on My Favorite Husband, were originally approached for the roles of Fred and Ethel, but neither could accept owing to previous commitments.

The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

The Burns and Allen ShowBurns & AllenBurns and Allen
Benaderet was then a prominent figure on television in situation comedies, first with The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show from 1950 to 1958, for which she earned two Emmy Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress. However, Benaderet had to turn down the offer since she was contracted to the television adaptation of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, so Vivian Vance was eventually cast.
Bea Benaderet carried over from the Burns and Allen radio show, portraying neighbor Blanche Morton, but over the course of the series, four different actors played her husband.

Sara Berner

The following year she received her first big break in the industry on The Jack Benny Program, where she played Gertrude Gearshift, a wisecracking Brooklyn-accented telephone operator who gossiped about Jack Benny with her cohort Mabel Flapsaddle (Sara Berner).
On The Jack Benny Program, she played various one-time parts before joining the principal cast as the recurring characters of Jack Benny's girlfriend Gladys Zybisco, and wisecracking telephone operator Mabel Flapsaddle, who gossiped about Benny with her cohort Gertrude Gearshift (Bea Benaderet), while Benny waited impatiently on the other end of the line for them to complete his call.

The Jack Benny Program

The Jack Benny ShowJack Benny ShowJack Benny Program
The following year she received her first big break in the industry on The Jack Benny Program, where she played Gertrude Gearshift, a wisecracking Brooklyn-accented telephone operator who gossiped about Jack Benny with her cohort Mabel Flapsaddle (Sara Berner).

KFRC (defunct)

KFRCKFRC radioKFRC-AM
In 1926, Benaderet joined the staff of KFRC, which was under the new ownership of Don Lee and where her duties included acting, singing, writing, and producing.
Other personalities associated with KFRC during the Don Lee era were Art Linkletter, Mel Venter, Bea Benaderet, Harold Peary, Morey Amsterdam, Juanita Tennyson, Merv Griffin, and John Nesbitt.

Little Red Riding Rabbit

Her characterizations included an obnoxious teenage bobbysox version of Little Red Riding Hood in Little Red Riding Rabbit (1944), Witch Hazel in Bewitched Bunny (1954), Tweety's owner "Granny" over several cartoons including the Academy Award-winning Tweetie Pie (1947), and Mama Bear in a series of Three Bears shorts, which animator Chuck Jones called one of his favorite portrayals.
Little Red Riding Hood is depicted as a typical 1940s teen-aged girl, a "bobby soxer" with an extremely loud and grating voice (inspired by screen and radio comedian Cass Daley, provided by Bea Benaderet).

Gracie Allen

GracieGracie Allen AwardsSurprise Party
Benaderet and Gracie Allen regularly shopped for their own on-set wardrobe, and she developed a high-pitched laugh for Blanche that became a staple of the character and was often used for comic effect: "When we had a scene with some silent spots in it, George would say to me, 'Laugh there, Bea. Benaderet garnered two Primetime Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series in 1954 and 1955. Following Allen's retirement in 1958 at the end of the eighth season, the program continued as The George Burns Show in 1958–59 with Blanche repackaged as George's secretary, but it was canceled after one season due to low ratings. Benaderet worked sparsely in 1959, filming one-time appearances on General Electric Theater and The Restless Gun.
Co-star Bea Benaderet said of Allen in 1966: "She was probably one of the greatest actresses of our time."

Burns and Allen

George Burns and Gracie AllenThe Burns and Allen ShowBurns & Allen
Benaderet first specialized in voiceover work in the golden age of radio, appearing on numerous programs while working with comedians of the era such as Jack Benny, Burns and Allen, and Lucille Ball. Other recurring characters Benaderet portrayed were Blanche Morton on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; school principal Eve Goodwin on The Great Gildersleeve; Millicent Carstairs on Fibber McGee & Molly; Gloria the maid on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; and Iris Atterbury on the Lucille Ball vehicle My Favorite Husband, opposite Gale Gordon.
Burns and Allen had several regulars on radio, including Toby Reed, Gale Gordon, Bea Benaderet, Gracie's real-life friend Mary "Bubbles" Kelly, Ray Noble, singers Jimmy Cash and Tony Martin and actor/writer/director Elliott Lewis.

Witch Hazel (Looney Tunes)

Witch HazelWitch LezahLooney Tunes'' Witch Hazel
Her characterizations included an obnoxious teenage bobbysox version of Little Red Riding Hood in Little Red Riding Rabbit (1944), Witch Hazel in Bewitched Bunny (1954), Tweety's owner "Granny" over several cartoons including the Academy Award-winning Tweetie Pie (1947), and Mama Bear in a series of Three Bears shorts, which animator Chuck Jones called one of his favorite portrayals.
In her initial appearance, Bewitched Bunny (1954), she is voiced by Bea Benaderet.

June Foray

June Foray AwardRocky
In 1955, she was succeeded by June Foray as Warner's premier female voice artist.
For Warner Brothers, she was Granny (whom she has played on vinyl records starting in 1950, before officially voicing her in Red Riding Hoodwinked, released in 1955, taking over for Bea Benaderet), owner of Tweety and Sylvester, and a series of witches, including Looney Tunes' own Witch Hazel, with Jones as director.

Fibber McGee and Molly

Fibber McGee & MollyFibber McGeeJim and Marian Jordan
Other recurring characters Benaderet portrayed were Blanche Morton on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; school principal Eve Goodwin on The Great Gildersleeve; Millicent Carstairs on Fibber McGee & Molly; Gloria the maid on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; and Iris Atterbury on the Lucille Ball vehicle My Favorite Husband, opposite Gale Gordon.

The Great Gildersleeve

GildersleeveGreat Gildersleeveseries
Other recurring characters Benaderet portrayed were Blanche Morton on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; school principal Eve Goodwin on The Great Gildersleeve; Millicent Carstairs on Fibber McGee & Molly; Gloria the maid on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; and Iris Atterbury on the Lucille Ball vehicle My Favorite Husband, opposite Gale Gordon.
His friends included Shirley Mitchell (Leila Ranson), Una Merkel (Adaline Fairchild), Bea Benaderet (Eve Goodwin), Martha Scott (Ellen Bullard Knickerbocker) Jeanne Bates (Paula Bullard Winthrop) and Cathy Lewis (Katherine Milford).

The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet

The Adventures of Ozzie & HarrietOzzie and HarrietOzzie & Harriet
Other recurring characters Benaderet portrayed were Blanche Morton on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show; school principal Eve Goodwin on The Great Gildersleeve; Millicent Carstairs on Fibber McGee & Molly; Gloria the maid on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; and Iris Atterbury on the Lucille Ball vehicle My Favorite Husband, opposite Gale Gordon.
Other cast members included John Brown as Syd "Thorny" Thornberry, Lurene Tuttle as Harriet's mother, Bea Benaderet as Gloria, Janet Waldo as Emmy Lou, and Francis "Dink" Trout as Roger.

Granby's Green Acres

1950 radio sitcom
The 1950 CBS program Granby's Green Acres, a perceived spinoff of My Favorite Husband, was her one radio lead role and reunited her with Gordon as a husband and wife who abandon city life to become farmers, but it lasted only eight episodes.
In fact, radio regulars Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet (who played John and Martha Granby) also played Mr. and Mrs. Atterbury on My Favorite Husband.

Top Cat

belowBoss CatChoo-Choo
He asked afterwards what part they preferred; Vander Pyl recalled in 1994: "I said, 'Oh, I want to be Wilma!' [and] Bea said, 'That's fine with me. Benaderet adapted her Burns & Allen laugh for Betty's signature giggle, and she voiced guest spots on the side for fellow Hanna-Barbera productions Top Cat, The Yogi Bear Show, and The Jetsons during 1961 and 1962. While filming the debut season of her show Petticoat Junction the next year, she continued voicing Betty by recording with her Flintstones castmates during evening hours, but scheduling conflicts forced her to drop the role at the end of the fourth season in 1964, and she was replaced by Gerry Johnson.

George Burns

GeorgeGeorge Burns and Gracie Allen
Blanche's husband Harry was played by four actors over the show's eight-year run; the last, Larry Keating, was introduced on the October 5, 1953 fourth-season premiere when George Burns entered the set and halted a scene of an angered Blanche preparing to hit Harry with a book.
The supporting cast during this phase included Mel Blanc as the melancholy, ironically named "Happy Postman" (his catchphrase was "Remember, keep smiling!"); Bea Benaderet (later Cousin Pearl in The Beverly Hillbillies, Kate Bradley in Petticoat Junction and the voice of Betty Rubble in The Flintstones) and Hal March (later more famous as the host of The $64,000 Question) as neighbors Blanche and Harry Morton; and the various members of Gracie's ladies' club, the Beverly Hills Uplift Society.

Tweety

Tweety BirdTweety PieBaby Tweety
Her characterizations included an obnoxious teenage bobbysox version of Little Red Riding Hood in Little Red Riding Rabbit (1944), Witch Hazel in Bewitched Bunny (1954), Tweety's owner "Granny" over several cartoons including the Academy Award-winning Tweetie Pie (1947), and Mama Bear in a series of Three Bears shorts, which animator Chuck Jones called one of his favorite portrayals.

General Electric Theater

General Electric TheatreG.E. TheatreG.E. True Theater
Benaderet and Gracie Allen regularly shopped for their own on-set wardrobe, and she developed a high-pitched laugh for Blanche that became a staple of the character and was often used for comic effect: "When we had a scene with some silent spots in it, George would say to me, 'Laugh there, Bea. Benaderet garnered two Primetime Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series in 1954 and 1955. Following Allen's retirement in 1958 at the end of the eighth season, the program continued as The George Burns Show in 1958–59 with Blanche repackaged as George's secretary, but it was canceled after one season due to low ratings. Benaderet worked sparsely in 1959, filming one-time appearances on General Electric Theater and The Restless Gun.

Vivian Vance

However, Benaderet had to turn down the offer since she was contracted to the television adaptation of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, so Vivian Vance was eventually cast.
Lucille Ball had wanted either Bea Benaderet or Barbara Pepper, both close friends, to play the role.

The Campbell Playhouse (radio series)

The Campbell PlayhouseCampbell Playhouse1938–40 radio series of the same name
She made her network radio debut upon being hired by Orson Welles for his Mercury Theatre repertory company heard on The Campbell Playhouse.

The George Burns Show

Benaderet and Gracie Allen regularly shopped for their own on-set wardrobe, and she developed a high-pitched laugh for Blanche that became a staple of the character and was often used for comic effect: "When we had a scene with some silent spots in it, George would say to me, 'Laugh there, Bea. Benaderet garnered two Primetime Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series in 1954 and 1955. Following Allen's retirement in 1958 at the end of the eighth season, the program continued as The George Burns Show in 1958–59 with Blanche repackaged as George's secretary, but it was canceled after one season due to low ratings. Benaderet worked sparsely in 1959, filming one-time appearances on General Electric Theater and The Restless Gun.
Blanche Morton (Bea Benaderet) was George's secretary, and was keeping George from fawning over attractive women, for Gracie's sake (Gracie was mentioned on the show, but never seen).

The Yogi Bear Show

Yogi Bear*Nickelodeon's Most Wanted: Yogi Bear
He asked afterwards what part they preferred; Vander Pyl recalled in 1994: "I said, 'Oh, I want to be Wilma!' [and] Bea said, 'That's fine with me. Benaderet adapted her Burns & Allen laugh for Betty's signature giggle, and she voiced guest spots on the side for fellow Hanna-Barbera productions Top Cat, The Yogi Bear Show, and The Jetsons during 1961 and 1962. While filming the debut season of her show Petticoat Junction the next year, she continued voicing Betty by recording with her Flintstones castmates during evening hours, but scheduling conflicts forced her to drop the role at the end of the fourth season in 1964, and she was replaced by Gerry Johnson.