Bearskin

bearskin capbearskinsbearskin capsgrenadier caps
A bearskin is a tall fur cap, usually worn as part of a ceremonial military uniform.wikipedia
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Cap

skullcaparticle of headwear
A bearskin is a tall fur cap, usually worn as part of a ceremonial military uniform.
Bearskin

Grenadier

grenadiersgrenadier companyGranaderos
Traditionally, the bearskin was the headgear of grenadiers and remains in use by grenadier and guards regiments in various armies.
While there were some exceptions, the most typical grenadier headdress was either the mitre cap or the bearskin.

Foot guards

GuardsguardsmanGuard
The British Foot Guards and Royal Scots Greys did however wear bearskins in battle during the Crimean War and on peacetime manoeuvres until the introduction of khaki service dress in 1902.
There are various other distinguishing features of the uniforms of the regiments, such as the colour of the plume, which side it is worn on the bearskin, the collar badge and the shoulder badge.

The Royal Regiment of Canada

10th Royal GrenadiersRoyal Regiment of CanadaRoyal Regiment of Canada Museum
The Royal Regiment of Canada (1862) These include the band and corps of drums of the British Army's Honourable Artillery Company, the Pipes and Drums of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, the band and pioneers of The Royal Regiment of Canada, the band of the Sri Lanka Artillery, and drum majors of the Royal Highland Fusiliers- 2nd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland; United States Marine Band, the United States Army Band, the United States Navy Band, the United States Coast Guard Band, the United States Air Force Band, and the United States Army Field Band.
The ceremonial dress uniform of the Royal Regiment of Canada is the scarlet tunic and bearskin, similar to that of the British Army's Grenadier Guards.

Governor General's Foot Guards

Governor General's Foot Guards Regimental Museum21st Armoured Regiment (The Governor General's Foot Guards)1st Battalion Governor General's Foot Guards
Governor General's Foot Guards (1872),
The regimental dress uniform has buttons in pairs, similar to the Coldstream Guards, with a red plume (of different material and lengths, dependent on the rank of the soldier) worn on the left side of the bearskin.

Thai Royal Guards parade

Royal Guards' paradeTrooping the ColourTrooping the Colours and Armed Forces Pledge of Loyalty
Most units of the Royal Guards of Thailand wear pith helmets with heavy plumes resembling bearskins with their ceremonial uniforms, especially during the Thai Royal Guards parade held every year in December.
The parade is notable for the colourful uniforms on display; pith helmets with heavy plumes resembling bearskins are worn, except for the lone cavalry unit in attendance - with British-style cavalry helmets and Thai lances on horsebacks - and the Naval Cadets.

Honourable Artillery Company

HAC11th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)13th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)
The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, Honourable Artillery Company and officers of Fusilier regiments also wear the bearskin as part of their ceremonial uniform. These include the band and corps of drums of the British Army's Honourable Artillery Company, the Pipes and Drums of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, the band and pioneers of The Royal Regiment of Canada, the band of the Sri Lanka Artillery, and drum majors of the Royal Highland Fusiliers- 2nd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland; United States Marine Band, the United States Army Band, the United States Navy Band, the United States Coast Guard Band, the United States Air Force Band, and the United States Army Field Band.
In Full Dress (normally only worn by the Band and Corps of Drums), the Bearskin is worn without a plume.

Belgian Royal Escort

Royal EscortEscorte Royale
The bearskin is also worn by the mounted Royal Escort.
The full dress uniform of bearskin, black tunic and white breeches then adopted, and still worn, had been that of the mounted gendarmerie prior to 1914.

Busby

busbiesRussian busbyRifle busby
This did not include use of the busby and other types of smaller fur headdress sometimes confused with the high bearskin.
The busby should not be mistaken for the much taller bearskin cap, worn most notably by the five regiments of Foot Guards of the Household Division (Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards).

Royal Scots Greys

2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)2nd DragoonsScots Greys
The British Foot Guards and Royal Scots Greys did however wear bearskins in battle during the Crimean War and on peacetime manoeuvres until the introduction of khaki service dress in 1902.
The most noticeable difference in the uniform of the Scots Greys was that the regimental full dress worn as general issue until 1914 included a bearskin cap.

Fusilier

fusiliersfusilsFüsilier
The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, Honourable Artillery Company and officers of Fusilier regiments also wear the bearskin as part of their ceremonial uniform.
However, Fusilier officers wore a taller bearskin like their counterparts in the Foot Guards The badge for each regiment was placed at the front of the bear or raccoon skin headdress, and consisted of a stylized flaming grenade, with different emblems placed on the ball of the grenade.

Royal Life Guards (Denmark)

Royal Life GuardsDen Kongelige LivgardeKing's Royal Guard
Royal Life Guards or Den Kongelige Livgarde (1658)
The review order uniform of the Royal Life Guards, worn while they are on guard duty, consists of bearskin headdresses, dark blue tunics and light blue trousers with white stripes.

Regiment Carabiniers Prins Boudewijn – Grenadiers

Regiment of GrenadiersBattalion Carabiniers "Prins Boudewijn" - Grenadiers1ste Regiment Grenadiers
Until 1914, bearskins were worn in parade uniform by the Régiment des Grenadiers ("Regiment of Grenadiers") of the Belgian Army.

Life Guards (Sweden)

Life GuardsLife GuardLivgardet
Life Guards or Svea Life Guards (1521)
In 1823, Emperor Alexander I of Russia presented King Charles XIV John of Sweden with a gift of bearskin headdresses to be worn by the Svea Life Guards.

Corps of Gendarmerie of Vatican City

Corpo della GendarmeriaGendarmerie CorpsPontifical Gendarmerie
The Papal Corpo della Gendarmeria wore bearskins as part of their ceremonial uniform until this force was disbanded in 1970.
These included bearskin headdresses with red plumes, black coatees with white-fringed epaulettes, white doeskin breeches and knee-high riding boots.

Grenadier Guards

1st Foot Guards1st Regiment of Foot GuardsGrenadier
Following the Battle of Waterloo and the action in which they gained their name, the Grenadier Guards were permitted to wear the bearskin.

Feather bonnet

feather hatsfeather
Feather bonnet, which resembles a bearskin.
On the return of the 42nd Foot to Britain in 1790 an official report commented that "Their bonnets are entirely disfigured. They are so covered with lofty feathers that they appear like grenadier caps of black bearskin."

Royal 22nd Regiment

Royal 22 e Régiment22nd Battalion, CEF3rd Battalion, Royal 22 Regiment
Royal 22 e Régiment (1914),

Royal Highland Fusiliers

Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment)The Royal Highland FusiliersThe Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland
These include the band and corps of drums of the British Army's Honourable Artillery Company, the Pipes and Drums of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, the band and pioneers of The Royal Regiment of Canada, the band of the Sri Lanka Artillery, and drum majors of the Royal Highland Fusiliers- 2nd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland; United States Marine Band, the United States Army Band, the United States Navy Band, the United States Coast Guard Band, the United States Air Force Band, and the United States Army Field Band.
The Drum major wears Mackenzie tartan trews, fusilier officer's full dress pattern scarlet doublet and bearskin with a grenade cap badge and white hackle.

United States Marine Band

Marine BandU.S. Marine BandThe President's Own" United States Marine Band
These include the band and corps of drums of the British Army's Honourable Artillery Company, the Pipes and Drums of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, the band and pioneers of The Royal Regiment of Canada, the band of the Sri Lanka Artillery, and drum majors of the Royal Highland Fusiliers- 2nd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland; United States Marine Band, the United States Army Band, the United States Navy Band, the United States Coast Guard Band, the United States Air Force Band, and the United States Army Field Band. United States Marine Band
The Drum Major's uniform is unique; he wears a bearskin headpiece and carries a ceremonial mace used to signal commands to the musicians.

History of the Scots Guards (1946–present)

2nd Battalion, The Scots Guards
The regiment cherishes its traditions, especially on the parade ground where the scarlet uniform and bearskin have become synonymous with the regiment and the other Guards regiments.

Irish Guards

1 IGIrish Guardsman1st Bn Irish Guards
They also have a prominent St. Patrick's blue plume on the right side of their bearskins.

You Must Be Joking! (1965 film)

You Must Be Joking!You Must Be JokingYou Must Be Joking!'' (1965 film)
Four British soldiers - Sergeant Major McGregor (complete with kilt and bearskin), Captain Tabasco, father of nine Sergeant Clegg, Sergeant Mansfield - and United States Air Force Lieutenant Morton have their initiative tested in a scavenger hunt, set for them by a British Army psychologist, Major Foskett (Terry-Thomas).