Begging the questionwikipedia
Begging the question is a logical fallacy that occurs when an argument's premises assume the truth of the conclusion, instead of supporting it.
begging the questionbegs the questionbeg the questioncircular reasoningcircularquestion-beggingpetitio principiiCircularityvicious circlebegged the question

Circular reasoning

circular reasoningcircular argumentcircular
Begging the question is a logical fallacy that occurs when an argument's premises assume the truth of the conclusion, instead of supporting it. It is a type of circular reasoning and an informal fallacy: an argument that requires that the desired conclusion be true.
Begging the question is closely related to circular reasoning, and in modern usage the two generally refer to the same thing.

Formal fallacy

logical fallacynon sequiturformal fallacy
Begging the question is a logical fallacy that occurs when an argument's premises assume the truth of the conclusion, instead of supporting it. It is a type of circular reasoning and an informal fallacy: an argument that requires that the desired conclusion be true.
* The self-reliant fallacy

Sophistical Refutations

Sophistical RefutationsSophistici ElenchiSophismata
Aristotle discusses this in Sophistical Refutations and in Prior Analytics book II, (64b, 34–65a 9, for circular reasoning see 57b, 18–59b, 1).
start=7, Accident (fallacy), Accident, Secundum quid, Irrelevant conclusion, Begging the question, False cause, Affirming the consequent, Fallacy of many questions

Fallacies of definition

fallacies of definition
If one concept is defined by another, and the other is defined by the first, this is known as a circular definition, akin to circular reasoning: neither offers enlightenment about what one wanted to know.

Presuppositional apologetics

presuppositional apologeticspresuppositionalismpresuppositionalist
Critics of presuppositional apologetics claim that it is logically invalid because it begs the question of the truth of Christianity and the non-truth of other worldviews.

Fallacy

fallacyinformal fallacyfallacies
Begging the question is a logical fallacy that occurs when an argument's premises assume the truth of the conclusion, instead of supporting it. It is a type of circular reasoning and an informal fallacy: an argument that requires that the desired conclusion be true.

Evasion (ethics)

evadeevasiondodging the question
In modern vernacular usage, "begging the question" is frequently used to mean "raising the question" or "dodging the question".

Hysteron proteron

hysteron proteronhusteron proteronhysterologia
When the fallacy involves only a single variable, it is sometimes called a hysteron proteron, as in the statement:

Irrelevant conclusion

ignoratio elenchired herringfallacy of relevance
Another related fallacy is ignoratio elenchi or irrelevant conclusion: an argument that fails to address the issue in question, but appears to do so. An example might be a situation where A and B are debating whether the law permits A to do something.

Open-question argument

open-question argumentopen question argument
The idea that Moore begs the question (i.e. assumes the conclusion in a premise) was first raised by W. Frankena.

Regress argument

regress argumentinfinite regressregress
In this view, P ultimately supports P, begging the question.

Complex question

trick questionfallacy of many questionscomplex question
Begging the question is similar to the complex question (also known as trick question or fallacy of many questions): a question that, to be valid, requires the truth of another question that has not been established.
This fallacy can be also confused with petitio principii, begging the question, which offers a premise no more plausible than, and often just a restatement of, the conclusion.

Appeal to nature

appeal to naturenaturalunnatural
An appeal to nature would thus beg the question, because the conclusion is entailed by the premise.

Relativist fallacy

relativist fallacy
On this formulation, the very name "relativist fallacy" begs the question against anyone who earnestly (however mistakenly or not) holds that there are no "objective facts."

Vish (game)

VishVish'' (game)
In the game of Vish (short for vicious circle), players compete to find circularity in dictionary definitions.

Miracles (book)

MiraclesMiracles: A preliminary studyMiracles'' (book)
He accuses modern historians and scientific thinkers, particularly secular Bible scholars, of begging the question against miracles, insisting that modern disbelief in miracles is a cultural bias thrust upon the historical record and is not derivable from it.

Abortion debate

abortion debateabortionmorality of abortion
Such appeals can generate confusion if the type of rights is not specified (whether civil, natural, or otherwise) or if it is simply assumed that the right appealed to takes precedence over all other competing rights (an example of begging the question).

Criticism of science

critic of sciencecriticism of science
In other words, science is begging the question when it presupposes that there is a universal truth with no proof thereof.

Causality

causalitycausalcausation
First, theorists complain that these accounts are circular.