Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec

Arnold's expedition to Quebecexpedition to Quebecan expeditioninvasion of Canadalead a forceThis expedition1775 Quebec expeditiona 1775 expeditionan arduous marcharduous trek
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.wikipedia
143 Related Articles

Battle of Quebec (1775)

Battle of QuebecQuebecsiege of Quebec
Failing in this, they withdrew to Point-aux-Trembles until Montgomery arrived to lead an unsuccessful attack on the city.
Montgomery's army had captured Montreal on November 13, and early in December they became one force that was led by Arnold, whose men had made an arduous trek through the wilderness of northern New England.

Benedict Arnold

ArnoldBenedictGen. Benedict Arnold
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.
He received a colonel's commission in the Continental Army for this expedition and left Cambridge in September 1775 with 1,100 men.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.
The Americans attacked Quebec City on December 31 after an arduous march but were defeated.

Roger Enos

Most of these were divided into two battalions: one commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Roger Enos and the other by Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Greene.
In 1775, he took part in Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec, and he later commanded the Vermont Militia as a Major General.

Augusta, Maine

AugustaAugusta, MEAugusta (city)
Arnold's plan called for the expedition to sail from Newburyport, Massachusetts along the coast and then up the Kennebec River to Fort Western (now Augusta, Maine).
Later, during the American Revolutionary War Benedict Arnold and his 1,100 troops would use Fort Western as a staging area before continuing their journey up the Kennebec to the Battle of Quebec.

Daniel Morgan

Gen. Daniel Morgan
The rest were placed in a third battalion under Daniel Morgan that included three companies—250 men—of Continental riflemen from Virginia and the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment.
Early in the war, Morgan served in Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec and in the Saratoga campaign.

Henry Dearborn

General Henry DearbornDearbornGen. Dearborn
Among the volunteers were other men who rose to later prominence during and after the war, including Aaron Burr, Return J. Meigs, Henry Dearborn, and John Joseph Henry.
In the Revolutionary War, he served under Benedict Arnold in the expedition to Quebec, of which his journal provides an important record.

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, Jr.Aaron Burr Jr.Burr, Aaron
Among the volunteers were other men who rose to later prominence during and after the war, including Aaron Burr, Return J. Meigs, Henry Dearborn, and John Joseph Henry.
During the American Revolutionary War, Burr took part in Colonel Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec, an arduous trek of more than 300 mi through the frontier of Maine.

Chaudière River

ChaudièreChaudière valleyriver
More than a third of the men turned back before reaching the height of land between the Kennebec and Chaudière rivers.
It was also used by Benedict Arnold at the time of his 1775 expedition in the invasion of Quebec.

Richard Montgomery

MontgomeryGeneral MontgomeryGeneral Richard Montgomery
The other expedition invaded Quebec from Lake Champlain, led by Richard Montgomery.
On December 3, Montgomery gave Arnold's men, who had marched through the Maine wilderness to Quebec City and suffered much hardship along the way, much-needed supplies, including clothing and other winter supplies taken from the captured British ships.

Christopher Greene

Christopher
Most of these were divided into two battalions: one commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Roger Enos and the other by Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Greene.
Greene's regiment was part of Arnold's expedition through present-day Maine to attack the British garrison at Quebec.

Kennebec River

KennebecAtkins BayKennebec River Valley
Arnold's plan called for the expedition to sail from Newburyport, Massachusetts along the coast and then up the Kennebec River to Fort Western (now Augusta, Maine). The portages up the Kennebec River proved grueling, and the boats frequently leaked, ruining gunpowder and spoiling food supplies.
1,110 American Revolutionary War soldiers followed this route during Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec in 1775.

Fort Western

Old Fort WesternWestern
Arnold's plan called for the expedition to sail from Newburyport, Massachusetts along the coast and then up the Kennebec River to Fort Western (now Augusta, Maine). As the troop transports arrived, Arnold dispatched some of the men in the already-constructed bateaux up the Kennebec River 10 miles (16 km) to Fort Western, and the others by foot on a track leading to Fort Halifax, 45 miles (72 km) up the Kennebec.
In 1775, Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec stopped at Fort Western long enough to repair bateaux.

Major Reuben Colburn House

Colburn House State Historic SiteReuben Colburn's house
Arriving in Gardinerston on the 22nd, they spent the next few days at Reuben Colburn's house, organizing supplies and preparing the boats they would use for the rest of the expedition.
The house, one of the first to be built in the area, is most notable as one of the staging area's for Benedict Arnold's 1775 Quebec expedition.

Dead River (Kennebec River tributary)

Dead RiverDeadDead River (Kennebec River)
The second, under Lieutenant Church, was to survey the route as far as the Dead River, at a place known to the local Indians as the Great Carrying Place, so that Arnold might better estimate how far the column would need to travel each day.
In the fall of 1775 then newly commissioned Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of over 1000 men on a grueling trip through Maine, as part of the invasion of Canada.

Siege of Boston

besieged Bostonevacuation of Bostonbesieged in Boston
Because there had been little direct action at Boston after the Battle of Bunker Hill in June, many units stationed in the American camps besieging the town were bored with garrison life and eager for action.
On September 11, about 1,100 troops under the command of Benedict Arnold left for Quebec.

84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants)

Royal Highland Emigrants84th Regiment of Foot84th Regiment
The city of Quebec was then defended by about 150 men of the Royal Highland Emigrants under Lieutenant Colonel Allen Maclean, supported by about 500 poorly organized local militia and 400 marines from the two warships.
Montgomery and Benedict Arnold, who led an expedition through the wilderness of what is now Maine, combined forces and mounted attack on Quebec City.

1st Pennsylvania Regiment

1st Continental Regiment1stPennsylvania Rifle Regiment
The rest were placed in a third battalion under Daniel Morgan that included three companies—250 men—of Continental riflemen from Virginia and the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment.
Two companies, those of Captain William Hendricks and Captain Matthew Smith, accompanied Arnold's expedition to Quebec and were captured in the Battle of Quebec.

Simeon Thayer

Captain Simeon Thayer kept a journal which was published by the Rhode Island Historical Society in 1867 as The invasion of Canada in 1775.
He and his men went on Benedict Arnold's expedition to Quebec during which time he kept a journal of his experiences.

Eustis, Maine

EustisStrattonStratton, Maine
In Eustis, Maine, on the western shore of Flagstaff Lake, stands a marker commemorating the expedition.
Benedict Arnold and his troops passed through the area on October 19, 1775, on their way up the North Branch of the Dead River to fight in the ill-fated Battle of Quebec.

Fort Halifax (Maine)

Fort HalifaxHalifaxFort Halifax State Historic Site
As the troop transports arrived, Arnold dispatched some of the men in the already-constructed bateaux up the Kennebec River 10 miles (16 km) to Fort Western, and the others by foot on a track leading to Fort Halifax, 45 miles (72 km) up the Kennebec.
In September 1775, Fort Halifax hosted troops under Colonel Benedict Arnold on their expedition to Quebec City.

Timothy Bigelow (soldier)

Timothy Bigelow
Mount Bigelow in Maine was named for Major Timothy Bigelow, one of Arnold's officers.
He accompanied Benedict Arnold in his expedition to Quebec in 1775, and was captured there, remaining a prisoner until 1776.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.

Cambridge, Massachusetts

CambridgeCambridge, MACambridge, Mass.
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.

Province of Massachusetts Bay

MassachusettsMassachusetts BayProvince of Massachusetts
In September 1775, early in the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Benedict Arnold led a force of 1,100 Continental Army troops on an expedition from Cambridge in the Province of Massachusetts Bay to the gates of Quebec City.