Beneficial weed

A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.wikipedia
55 Related Articles

Weed

weedsvegetable pestsweedy species
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.
Many plants that people widely regard as weeds also are intentionally grown in gardens and other cultivated settings, in which case they are sometimes called beneficial weeds.

List of beneficial weeds

beneficial weeds
Some beneficial weeds, such as lamb's quarters and purslane, are edible and highly nutritional. Dandelions, a widespread invasive weed, were introduced to North America originally because they were considered a staple source of food; they were admired for maturing quickly and spreading vastly.
Beneficial weeds can accomplish a number of roles in the garden or yard, including fertilizing the soil, increasing moisture, acting as shelter or living mulch, repelling pests, attracting beneficial insects, or serving as food or other resources for human beings.

Taraxacum

dandeliondandelionsdandelion greens
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial. Some beneficial weeds, such as lamb's quarters and purslane, are edible and highly nutritional. Dandelions, a widespread invasive weed, were introduced to North America originally because they were considered a staple source of food; they were admired for maturing quickly and spreading vastly.
As the dandelion is commercially cultivated as food and as it is highly nutritious, wild-growing dandelions are more often than not considered a free food and a beneficial weed rather than a nuisance.

Dewberry

dewberries
Dewberries are common throughout most of the Northern Hemisphere and are thought of as a beneficial weed.

Polyculture

polyculturaldiversificationmulti-species systems
Beneficial weeds

Daucus carota

wild carrotQueen Anne's laceSea Carrot
Bishop's lace (Queen Anne's lace) works as a nurse plant for nearby crops like lettuce, shading them from overly intense sunlight and keeping more humidity in the air. It attracts predatory wasps and flies that eat vegetable pests. It has a scientifically tested beneficial effect on nearby tomato plants. When it is young it has an edible root, revealing its relationship to the domesticated carrot.
This beneficial weed can be used as a companion plant to crops.

Villa Gesell

Villa Gessel
First, he planted a high number of beneficial weeds, capable of surviving in the dunes, in order to anchor the sand in place.

Chrysopidae

green lacewinggreen lacewingslacewings
Gardeners can attract these lacewings – and therefore ensure a steady supply of larvae – by using certain companion plants and tolerating beneficial weeds.

Specialisterne

(The dandelion was symbolically chosen as a beneficial weed found in unexpected places, akin to the ethos of ASD including valuable skills.)

Domestication

domesticateddomesticdomesticate
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.

Companion planting

companion plantcompanion plantscompanion crop
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.

Soil health

healthyhealthy soilshealthy soil
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.

Benefit

beneficialbenefits
A beneficial weed is an invasive plant not generally considered domesticated (however, some plants, such as dandelions, in addition to growing wild, are commercially cultivated) that has some companion plant effect, is edible, contributes to soil health, adds ornamental value, or is otherwise beneficial.

Wildflower

wildflowerswild flowerswild flower
Beneficial weeds include many wildflowers, as well as other weeds that are commonly removed or poisoned.

Herbicide

herbicidesherbicidalweed killer
Beneficial weeds include many wildflowers, as well as other weeds that are commonly removed or poisoned.

Trifolium repens

white cloverladinoclover
For example, legumes, such as white clover, if they are colonized by the right bacteria (Rhizobium most often) add nitrogen to the soil through the process of nitrogen fixation, where the bacteria has a symbiotic relationship with its hosts roots, "fixing" atmospheric nitrogen (combining it with oxygen or hydrogen) making the nitrogen plant-available (NH4 or NO3).

Nitrogen

NN 2 dinitrogen
For example, legumes, such as white clover, if they are colonized by the right bacteria (Rhizobium most often) add nitrogen to the soil through the process of nitrogen fixation, where the bacteria has a symbiotic relationship with its hosts roots, "fixing" atmospheric nitrogen (combining it with oxygen or hydrogen) making the nitrogen plant-available (NH4 or NO3).

Nitrogen fixation

nitrogen-fixingfix nitrogennitrogen fixing
For example, legumes, such as white clover, if they are colonized by the right bacteria (Rhizobium most often) add nitrogen to the soil through the process of nitrogen fixation, where the bacteria has a symbiotic relationship with its hosts roots, "fixing" atmospheric nitrogen (combining it with oxygen or hydrogen) making the nitrogen plant-available (NH4 or NO3).

Artemisia (genus)

Artemisiawormwoodsagebrush
Some beneficial weeds repel insects and other pests through their smell, for example alliums and wormwood.

Glechoma hederacea

ground ivyCreeping Charliealehoof
Some weeds mask a companion plant's scent, or the pheromones of pest insects, as with ground ivy, as well as oregano and other mints.

Oregano

wild marjoramOriganum vulgareO. vulgare'' subsp. ''hirtum
Some weeds mask a companion plant's scent, or the pheromones of pest insects, as with ground ivy, as well as oregano and other mints.

Mentha

mintmint leavesmints
Some weeds mask a companion plant's scent, or the pheromones of pest insects, as with ground ivy, as well as oregano and other mints.

Trap crop

[7decoy cropssacrificial plant
Some weeds act as trap crops, distracting pests away from valued plants.