Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913
Pin button issued by "The Knights and Ladies of Security" of Topeka, Kansas
Early 19th century workplace militancy manifested in the Luddite riots, when unemployed workers destroyed labour saving machines.
Poster issued by the London Trades Council, advertising a demonstration held on 2 June 1873
Trade union demonstrators held at bay by soldiers during the 1912 Lawrence textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts
Eight-hour day march circa 1900, outside Parliament House in Spring Street, Melbourne
Costa Rican agricultural unions demonstration, January 2011
2011 National Trade Union Council (Zenrokyo) May Day march, Tokyo
Workers on strike in Oslo, Norway, 2012
Public sector workers in Leeds striking over pension changes by the government in November 2011
Child labourers in an Indiana glass works. Labor unions have an objective interest in combating child labour.
Cesar Chavez speaking at a 1974 United Farm Workers rally in Delano, California. The UFW during Chavez's tenure was committed to restricting immigration.
The Great Southwest Railroad Strike of 1886 was a trade union strike involving more than 200,000 workers.
A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike on 28 March 2006

Examples of benefit societies include trade unions, burial societies, friendly societies, cooperatives, credit unions, self-help groups, landsmanshaftn, immigrant hometown societies, fraternal organizations built upon the models of fraternal orders such as the Freemasons and the Oddfellows, some coworking communities, and many others.

- Benefit society

Recent historical research by Bob James in Craft, Trade or Mystery (2001) puts forward the view that trade unions are part of a broader movement of benefit societies, which includes medieval guilds, Freemasons, Oddfellows, friendly societies, and other fraternal organizations.

- Trade union
Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913

1 related topic

Alpha

The Syndics of the Drapers' Guild by Rembrandt, 1662.

Guild

Association of artisans and merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area.

Association of artisans and merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area.

The Syndics of the Drapers' Guild by Rembrandt, 1662.
One of the legacies of the guilds: the elevated Windsor Guildhall originated as a meeting place for guilds, as well as a magistrates' seat and town hall.
Traditional hand forged guild sign of a glazier — in Germany. These signs can be found in many old European towns where guild members marked their places of business. Many survived through time or staged a comeback in industrial times. Today they are restored or even newly created, especially in old town areas.
Coats of arms of guilds in a town in the Czech Republic displaying symbols of various European medieval trades and crafts
The medieval Merchant Guild House in Vyborg, Russia
A center of urban government: the Guildhall, London (engraving, c. 1805)
Locksmith, 1451
The Haarlem Painter's Guild in 1675, by Jan de Bray.
An example of the last of the British Guilds meeting rooms c. 1820
Shoemakers, 1568

In 1816, an archeological excavation in Minya, Egypt (under an Eyalet of the Ottoman Empire) produced a Nerva–Antonine dynasty-era tablet from the ruins of the Temple of Antinous in Antinoöpolis, Aegyptus that prescribed the rules and membership dues of a burial society collegium established in Lanuvium, Italia in approximately 133 AD during the reign of Hadrian (117–138) of the Roman Empire.

Often, they are better characterized as a labor union — for example, The Newspaper Guild is a labor union for journalists and other newspaper workers, with over 30,000 members in North America.