Benevolent dictator for life

BDFLBenevolent Dictator for Life'' (BDFL)Benevolent Dictators for Life
Benevolent dictator for life (BDFL) is a title given to a small number of open-source software development leaders, typically project founders who retain the final say in disputes or arguments within the community.wikipedia
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Guido van Rossum

Mondrian (Google software)
The phrase originated in 1995 with reference to Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language.
Guido van Rossum (born 31 January 1956) is a Dutch programmer best known as the author of the Python programming language, for which he was the "Benevolent dictator for life" (BDFL) until he stepped down from the position in July 2018.

Clojure

Rich HickeyClojureScriptClojure programming language
The current development process is community-driven, overseen by Rich Hickey as its benevolent dictator for life (BDFL).

Wes McKinney

Ursa Labs
He is the creator and "Benevolent Dictator for Life" (BDFL) of the open-source pandas package for data analysis in the Python programming language, and has also authored two versions of the reference book Python for Data Analysis.

Bram Moolenaar

He is the original author, maintainer, release manager, and benevolent dictator for life of Vim, a text editor that is very popular among programmers and power users.

Benevolent dictatorship

benevolent dictatorbenign dictatorshipbenevolent
BDFL should not be confused with the more common term for open-source leaders, "benevolent dictator", which was popularized by Eric S. Raymond's essay "Homesteading the Noosphere" (1999).

Ken Manheimer

Shortly after Van Rossum joined the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, the term appeared in a follow-up mail by Ken Manheimer to a meeting trying to create a semi-formal group that would oversee Python development and workshops; this initial use included an additional joke of naming Van Rossum the "First Interim BDFL".
He's been listed by Guido van Rossum together with Barry Warsaw as the probable inventor of the term Benevolent Dictator For Life (during his CNRI tenure).

Adrian Holovaty

EveryBlock
He and Kaplan-Moss served as the framework's Benevolent Dictators for Life until January 2014.

Python (programming language)

PythonPython programming languagePython 2
The phrase originated in 1995 with reference to Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language.
Van Rossum shouldered sole responsibility for the project, as the lead developer, until July 12, 2018, when he announced his "permanent vacation" from his responsibilities as Python's Benevolent Dictator For Life, a title the Python community bestowed upon him to reflect his long-term commitment as the project's chief decision-maker.

Patrick Volkerding

Volkerding is Slackware's "Benevolent Dictator for Life" (BDFL), and is also known informally as "The Man".

Mark Shuttleworth

M. ShuttleworthMark Richard ShuttleworthShuttleworth Foundation
In the Ubuntu project, Shuttleworth is often referred to with the tongue-in-cheek title "Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life" (SABDFL).

F Sharp (programming language)

F#F# programming language F# (programming language)
The language evolution process is managed by Don Syme from Microsoft Research as the benevolent dictator for life (BDFL) for the language design, together with the F# Software Foundation.

Slackware

Slackware LinuxpkgtoolSlackintosh
All the final decisions about what is going to be included in a Slackware release strictly remain with Slackware's benevolent dictator for life, Patrick Volkerding.

Open-source software development

open-source developmentopen source software developmentopen-source
Benevolent dictator for life (BDFL) is a title given to a small number of open-source software development leaders, typically project founders who retain the final say in disputes or arguments within the community.

Corporation for National Research Initiatives

CNRI
Shortly after Van Rossum joined the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, the term appeared in a follow-up mail by Ken Manheimer to a meeting trying to create a semi-formal group that would oversee Python development and workshops; this initial use included an additional joke of naming Van Rossum the "First Interim BDFL".

Eric S. Raymond

Eric RaymondEric Steven RaymondRaymond, Eric
BDFL should not be confused with the more common term for open-source leaders, "benevolent dictator", which was popularized by Eric S. Raymond's essay "Homesteading the Noosphere" (1999).

Homesteading the Noosphere

BDFL should not be confused with the more common term for open-source leaders, "benevolent dictator", which was popularized by Eric S. Raymond's essay "Homesteading the Noosphere" (1999).

Hacker culture

hackerhackershacking
Among other topics related to hacker culture, Raymond elaborates on how the nature of open source forces the "dictatorship" to keep itself benevolent, since a strong disagreement can lead to the forking of the project under the rule of new leaders.

Fork (software development)

forkforkedforks
Among other topics related to hacker culture, Raymond elaborates on how the nature of open source forces the "dictatorship" to keep itself benevolent, since a strong disagreement can lead to the forking of the project under the rule of new leaders.