Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBenjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of BeaconsfieldBeaconsfieldEarl of BeaconsfieldThe Earl of BeaconsfieldBenjamin Disraeli, Earl of BeaconsfieldDisraelian The Right Honourable Benjamin Disraeli 1st '''Earl of Beaconsfield''' PC FRS B. Disraeli
Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British politician of the Conservative Party who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British politician of the Conservative Party who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
Under Benjamin Disraeli it played a preeminent role in politics at the height of the British Empire.

History of the Conservative Party (UK)

Conservative Partyhistorian of the Conservative PartyHistory of the British Conservative Party
He played a central role in the creation of the modern Conservative Party, defining its policies and its broad outreach.
Widening of the franchise in the 19th century led the party to popularise its approach, especially under Benjamin Disraeli, whose Reform Act of 1867 greatly increased the electorate.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
He made the Conservatives the party most identified with the glory and power of the British Empire.
To seek new markets and sources of raw materials, the British government under Benjamin Disraeli initiated a period of imperial expansion in Egypt, South Africa, and elsewhere.

British Jews

JewishAnglo-JewishBritish Jewish
He is the only British prime minister to have been of Jewish birth.
Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881), of Jewish birth although he joined the Church of England, served in government for three decades, twice as prime minister.

Endymion (Disraeli novel)

EndymionEndymion'' (Disraeli novel)
He had throughout his career written novels, beginning in 1826, and he published his last completed novel, Endymion, shortly before he died at the age of 76.
Endymion is a novel published in 1880 by Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, the former Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
Disraeli is remembered for his influential voice in world affairs, his political battles with the Liberal Party leader William Ewart Gladstone, and his one-nation conservatism or "Tory democracy".
In the 1874 general election Gladstone was defeated by the Conservatives under Benjamin Disraeli during a sharp economic recession.

Isaac D'Israeli

Isaac DisraeliIsaacCuriosities of Literature
Disraeli was born on 21 December 1804 at 6 King's Road, Bedford Row, Bloomsbury, London, the second child and eldest son of Isaac D'Israeli, a literary critic and historian, and Maria (Miriam), née Basevi.
He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.

Robert Blake, Baron Blake

Robert BlakeLord BlakeBlake, Robert
Although biographers including Robert Blake and Bradford comment that such a post was incompatible with Disraeli's romantic and ambitious nature, he reportedly gave his employers satisfactory service, and later professed to have learned a good deal from his time with the firm.
He is best known for his 1966 biography of Benjamin Disraeli, and for The Conservative Party from Peel to Churchill, which grew out of his 1968 Ford lectures.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorSecond Lord of the TreasuryChancellors of the Exchequer
When Lord Derby, the party leader, thrice formed governments in the 1850s and 1860s, Disraeli served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons.
Previous chancellors have opted for whisky (Kenneth Clarke), gin and tonic (Geoffrey Howe), brandy and water (Benjamin Disraeli and John Major), spritzer (Nigel Lawson) and sherry and beaten egg (William Gladstone).

1880 United Kingdom general election

18801880 general electiongeneral election of 1880
With Gladstone conducting a massive speaking campaign, his Liberals defeated Disraeli's Conservatives at the 1880 general election.
Gladstone vehemently attacked the foreign policy of the government of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, as utterly immoral.

The Representative (newspaper)

The RepresentativeThe Representative'' (newspaper)
The new paper, The Representative, promoted the mines and those politicians who supported them, particularly Canning.
In autumn 1825 the young Benjamin Disraeli convinced his father's friend, the publisher John Murray, that the time was ripe for a Canningite morning paper that would challenge The Times. Murray agreed to supply half of the capital, with Disraeli and John Diston Powles, a City speculator, each contributing one-quarter.

Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Lord DerbyEarl of DerbyLord Stanley
When Lord Derby, the party leader, thrice formed governments in the 1850s and 1860s, Disraeli served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons.
He broke with the Prime Minister again in 1845, this time over the repeal of the Corn Laws, and managed to bring the majority of the Conservative Party with him (including, among others, the young Benjamin Disraeli).

Vivian Grey

Disraeli's first novel, Vivian Grey, published anonymously in four volumes in 1826–27, was a thinly veiled re-telling of the affair of The Representative.
Vivian Grey is Benjamin Disraeli's first novel, published by Henry Colburn in 1826.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Great Britain
Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British politician of the Conservative Party who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
The first official recognition given to the office had only been in the Treaty of Berlin in 1878, when Disraeli signed as "First Lord of the Treasury and Prime Minister of her Britannic Majesty".

Tories (British political party)

ToryToriesTory Party
The choice of a Tory publication was regarded as strange by Disraeli's friends and relatives, who thought him more of a Radical.
One faction, led by Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, survived to become the modern Conservative Party, whose members are commonly still referred to as Tories as they still often follow and promote the ideology of Toryism.

Contarini Fleming

Contarini Fleming (1832) was avowedly a self-portrait.
Contarini Fleming - A Psychological Romance is the fourth and most autobiographical novel written by Benjamin Disraeli who would later become a Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Sharon Turner

Turner
Isaac's friend Sharon Turner, a solicitor, convinced him that although he could comfortably remain unattached to any formal religion it would be disadvantageous to the children if they did so.
When his friend Isaac D'Israeli left the synagogue after a dispute with the rabbi, Turner persuaded him to have his children, including the future Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, baptised in the Church of England, to give them a better chance in life.

The Wondrous Tale of Alroy

Alroy
The Wondrous Tale of Alroy the following year portrayed the problems of a medieval Jew in deciding between a small, exclusively Jewish state and a large empire embracing all.
The Wondrous Tale of Alroy is the sixth novel written by Benjamin Disraeli, who would later become a Prime Minister of Britain.

Leader of the House of Commons

Leader of the HouseDeputy Leader of the House of CommonsLeader
When Lord Derby, the party leader, thrice formed governments in the 1850s and 1860s, Disraeli served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons.

Anglo-Zulu War

Zulu WarAnglo–Zulu WarZulu Wars
Controversial wars in Afghanistan and South Africa undermined his public support.
British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli's Tory administration in London did not want a war with the Zulus.

Midlothian campaign

a massive speaking campaigncampaigning againstfamous campaigning speech
With Gladstone conducting a massive speaking campaign, his Liberals defeated Disraeli's Conservatives at the 1880 general election.
When Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli attempted to distract public opinion from the economic and financial problems of Britain by calling attention to the worsening [[History of the foreign relations of the United Kingdom#Relations with the Ottoman Empire|British-Ottoman relations]], Gladstone in four speeches charged the government with financial incompetence, neglect of domestic legislation, and mismanagement of foreign affairs.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Disraeli's second term was dominated by the Eastern Question—the slow decay of the Ottoman Empire and the desire of other European powers, such as Russia, to gain at its expense.
British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli advocated for restoring the Ottoman territories on the Balkan Peninsula during the Congress of Berlin, and in return Britain assumed the administration of Cyprus in 1878.

Shrewsbury (UK Parliament constituency)

ShrewsburyShrewsbury (seat 1/2)borough of Shrewsbury
Finding the financial demands of his Maidstone seat too much, Disraeli secured a Tory nomination for Shrewsbury, winning one of the constituency's two seats at the 1841 general election, despite serious opposition, and heavy debts which opponents seized on.
Famous MPs have included Sir Philip Sidney in 1581, Robert Clive (known as 'Clive of India') from 1761 to his death in 1774, and Benjamin Disraeli (later Prime Minister) in 1841-47.

Reform Act 1867

Second Reform ActRepresentation of the People Act 1867Reform Act of 1867
Before the Reform Act 1867, the working class did not possess the vote and therefore had little political power.
Following an unsuccessful attempt by Benjamin Disraeli to introduce a reform bill in 1859, Lord John Russell, who had played a major role in passing the 1832 Reform Act, attempted this in 1860; but the Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, a fellow Liberal, was against any further electoral reform.

John Diston Powles

J. D. Powles
He became involved with the financier J. D. Powles, who was prominent among those encouraging the mining boom.
In the mid-1820s he was heavily involved in the promotion of South American mining companies, and enlisted a young Benjamin Disraeli to write pamphlets promoting these mines, particularly those in Chile.