Windsor Castle, viewed from the Long Walk
The Counties of England as recorded in the Domesday Book.
Virginia Water Lake on the southern edge of Windsor Great Park
An 1824 map of the English and Welsh counties
Historic map of Berkshire
This (rather inaccurate) 1814 map shows Dudley in a detached part of Worcestershire surrounded by Staffordshire. Note the exclave of Shropshire (the parish of Halesowen), just to the south-east and part of Staffordshire (Broome and Clent) to the south-west as well.
The Oracle Corporation campus
Notice on the Corn Exchange, Royal Tunbridge Wells, mentioning the historic county boundary
Slough Trading Estate plays a major part in making Slough an important business centre in South East England
The ancient county boundaries of Warwickshire cover a larger area than the administrative area in 1974 (in green).
The grandstand at Ascot Racecourse
Former postal counties of England from 1974 to 1996
The Select Car Leasing Stadium in Reading
King Edward III of England
Catherine, HRH The Duchess of Cambridge
Ricky Gervais

Berkshire is a county of historic origin, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council.

- Berkshire

In most cases, these consist of simple truncation, usually with an "s" at the end signifying "shire", such as "Berks" for Berkshire or "Bucks" for Buckinghamshire.

- Historic counties of England
Windsor Castle, viewed from the Long Walk

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View from Box Hill

Surrey

View from Box Hill
Leith Hill Tower
The Roman Stane or Stone Street runs through Surrey
A map showing the traditional boundaries of Surrey (c. 800–1899) and its constituent hundreds
Runnymede, where Magna Carta was sealed
Guildford Castle
Ruins of the monks' dormitory at Waverley Abbey
Nonsuch Palace
George Abbot
The second Globe theatre, built 1614
Kew Palace in 1835
Britain's first crematorium, in the Borough of Woking
Guildford Cathedral, designed by Edward Maufe
Dennis Sabre fire engine
"Dragons teeth" antitank obstacles by the River Wey
The gate of Abbot's Hospital, Guildford
Epsom is famous for the Epsom Downs Racecourse which hosts the Epsom Derby; painting by James Pollard, c. 1835.
Export House in Woking, one of Surrey's tallest buildings
Lawns at RHS Garden, Wisley
Statue of a Martian tripod from The War of the Worlds in Woking, hometown of science fiction author H. G. Wells.
Bronze Age bell barrow on Horsell Common near Woking

Surrey is a county in South East England which borders Kent to the east, East Sussex to the southeast, West Sussex to the south, Hampshire to the west, Berkshire to the northwest, and Greater London to the northeast.

As a result of the 1965 boundary changes, many of the Surrey boroughs on the south bank of the river were transferred to Greater London, shortening the length associated with the county.

Danebury Fort – aerial image

Hampshire

County in South East England on the coast of the English Channel.

County in South East England on the coast of the English Channel.

Danebury Fort – aerial image
Plaque on Freemantle Common marking the route of the Roman Road from Chichester to Bitterne
Portchester combined Roman and Norman castles
Portsmouth historic dockyard, 2005
South West Hampshire & South East Dorset green belt (shown in green)
New Forest Pony in Burley
Winchester Cathedral
Hampshire County Council offices and Jubilee Fountain
Eastleigh railway works
Southampton Docks
The M3 near Basingstoke
County flag of Hampshire
Milestones Museum, Basingstoke
Ageas Bowl cricket ground, West End, 2010
Fratton Park football ground, Portsmouth, from Milton End, 2006
Former Hampshire Chronicle office in Winchester, circa 1999

Historically part of Hampshire, the Isle of Wight was made a separate ceremonial county and the towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch were administered as part of the ceremonial county of Dorset.

Hampshire is bordered by Dorset to the west, Wiltshire to the north-west, Berkshire to the north, Surrey to the north-east, and West Sussex to the east.

Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England (2021–2023)

Non-metropolitan county

County-level entity in England that is not a metropolitan county.

County-level entity in England that is not a metropolitan county.

Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England (2021–2023)

Many of the non-metropolitan counties bear historic names and most, such as Wiltshire and Staffordshire, end in the suffix "-shire".

An exception was made in the case of Berkshire, which was retained with its existing boundaries in spite of the abolition of its county council and the creation of six unitary authorities.

Map showing counties and unitary authorities from 1998. Pink (non-metropolitan) and green (metropolitan and London) areas were left unchanged. Yellow areas are unitary authorities created as a result of the review, whilst blue areas are remaining two-tier counties reduced by the creation of unitary authorities.

Local Government Commission for England (1992)

The body responsible for reviewing the structure of local government in England from 1992 to 2002.

The body responsible for reviewing the structure of local government in England from 1992 to 2002.

Map showing counties and unitary authorities from 1998. Pink (non-metropolitan) and green (metropolitan and London) areas were left unchanged. Yellow areas are unitary authorities created as a result of the review, whilst blue areas are remaining two-tier counties reduced by the creation of unitary authorities.
The Commission's final recommendations for county Derbyshire from 1993. Area Derby 9 would form a unitary authority, as would areas North East Derbyshire 6, Chesterfield 7 and Bolsover (district) 8. The rest of the county would remain two-tier. Ultimately only Derby would form a unitary authority.
The Commission's draft recommendations for Cambridgeshire. The purple area is Huntingdonshire, the yellow area the proposed Peterborough & The Fens authority, and the pink area the proposed City & County of Cambridge.

After much political debate and several legal challenges, the Commission's proposals resulted in the abolition of Berkshire county council and the counties of Avon, Cleveland, Hereford and Worcester and Humberside (created in 1974).

The Commission rejected the case of Huntingdonshire (a historic county, and the constituency of the Prime Minister, John Major), noting that there was "no exceptional county allegiance" and doubting the capacity of Huntingdonshire and the viability of the remaining Cambridgeshire.

Arms of the former London County Council

Greater London

Administrative area in England governed by the Greater London Authority, and a ceremonial county that covers the bulk of the same area, with the exception of the City of London, which forms a separate ceremonial county.

Administrative area in England governed by the Greater London Authority, and a ceremonial county that covers the bulk of the same area, with the exception of the City of London, which forms a separate ceremonial county.

Arms of the former London County Council
Arms of the former Greater London Council
Map of Greater London showing railway lines, primary roads, motorways, and suburban towns
The London postal district in red in contrast to Greater London
Greater London population from 1880 to 2016.
Westminster Abbey. A World Heritage Site and location of the coronation of British monarchs.
University College London, a founding constituent of the University of London.
King's College London, a founding constituent of the University of London.

As a ceremonial county, Greater London has a Lord-Lieutenant and a High Sheriff, both appointed by the British monarch, but Greater London is not one of England's historic counties.

Greater London is also bounded by Hertfordshire to the north, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire to the west, Kent to the southeast and Surrey to the south and southwest.

Brasenose Lane in Oxford city centre, a street onto which three colleges back.

Oxfordshire

Landlocked county in the far west of the government statistical region of South East England.

Landlocked county in the far west of the government statistical region of South East England.

Brasenose Lane in Oxford city centre, a street onto which three colleges back.
The University of Oxford's Chemistry Research Laboratory.
The Abbey, Sutton Courtenay, a ‘textbook’ example of the English medieval manor house.
Wantage Market Place

The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west.

All its zones south of the Thames: the Vale of White Horse and parts of South Oxfordshire were within the historic county of Berkshire, including the highest point, the 261 m White Horse Hill.