Bertold Wiesner

Berthold P. WiesnerBertold P. WiesnerBertold Paul WiesnerBerthold Paul WiesnerBerthold WiesnerBertold Weisner
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.wikipedia
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Parapsychology

parapsychologistparapsychologicalpsychical research
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.
The term was coined by biologist Berthold P. Wiesner, and first used by psychologist Robert Thouless in a 1942 article published in the British Journal of Psychology.

Mary Barton (obstetrician)

Mary Barton
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England. Wiesner's biological offspring, conceived by artificial insemination performed by Mary Barton and confirmed by DNA testing, include author and psychotherapist Paul Newham, Barrister David Gollancz, and film maker Barry Stevens, whose documentary films were instrumental in facilitating and publicizing the process by which Wiesner's offspring can confirm their paternity.
It seems likely that one of the main donors was her husband, Dr Bertold Wiesner, but all patient records were apparently destroyed when their London clinic closed in 1967.

Eva Ibbotson

Ibbotson, Eva
They had one daughter: the author Eva Ibbotson, born in 1925.
Her father, Bertold Paul Wiesner, was a physician who pioneered human infertility treatment.

Anna Gmeyner

Anna ReinerAnna Wilhelmine Gmeyner
Wiesner was briefly married to the Austrian author, playwright, and scriptwriter Anna Gmeyner.
She married Berthold P. Wiesner, a controversial physician who pioneered human infertility treatment, who recently found that he was actually the father of maybe one thousand of the children his clinic in London helped to be conceived.

Francis Albert Eley Crew

Francis CrewCrewFrancis Albert Crew
The following year in 1928, Wiesner was appointed to the position of head of Sex Physiology by animal geneticist Francis Crew, Professor of Animal Genetics at the newly established Institute of Animal Genetics (IAG) established within the University of Edinburgh.
His staff at the Institute was illustrious: including John Burdon Sanderson Haldane, Lancelot Hogben, Julian Huxley, Bertold Paul Wiesner and (as a postgraduate) Honor Fell.

Paul Newham

Wiesner's biological offspring, conceived by artificial insemination performed by Mary Barton and confirmed by DNA testing, include author and psychotherapist Paul Newham, Barrister David Gollancz, and film maker Barry Stevens, whose documentary films were instrumental in facilitating and publicizing the process by which Wiesner's offspring can confirm their paternity.
Newham's biological father was Berthold Paul Wiesner, the physiologist known for coining the term 'Psi', now widely used to signify parapsychological phenomena, and who sired possibly as many as six hundred children through anonymous sperm donation at the London medical offices of his wife, Dr Mary Barton.

Derek Richter

D. RichterDr Derek Richter
(They also raised a daughter, Ruth.) From the beginning of Barton's practice until Wiesner's retirement in the mid-late 1960s, Mary Barton successfully inseminated an estimated 1500 women, the majority with sperm provided from Wiesner, some 1-200 from neuroscientist Derek Richter as well as an unknown number from as yet unidentified donors.
Concern for the childless women prompted him, through medical colleague Bertold Wiesner to become one of the first sperm donors at Mary Barton (Wiesner's wife)'s insemination clinic in London.

Barry Stevens (filmmaker)

Barry Stevens
Wiesner's biological offspring, conceived by artificial insemination performed by Mary Barton and confirmed by DNA testing, include author and psychotherapist Paul Newham, Barrister David Gollancz, and film maker Barry Stevens, whose documentary films were instrumental in facilitating and publicizing the process by which Wiesner's offspring can confirm their paternity.
Through the making of Offspring and Bio-Dad, which chronicled the search for his own sperm-donor father, Stevens discovered he was one of 1000 potential offspring of Dr. Bertold P. Wiesner, who ran a London-based fertility clinic between 1943 and 1962.

Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

FRSEFellow of the Royal Society of EdinburghHFRSE
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England. Wiesner was briefly married to the Austrian author, playwright, and scriptwriter Anna Gmeyner.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Fertility

fertilemale fertilityfemale fertility
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England. During 1926 while Wiesner was still in Austria, he began investigating the role of hormones in regulating fertility and their impact on fetal development.

Pregnancy

pregnantfirst trimesterpregnant women
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Sperm

sperm cellspermatiasperm cells
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Obstetrics

obstetricianobstetricobstetrical
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Artificial insemination

intrauterine inseminationartificially inseminatedIUI
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Harley Street

Upper Harley StreetHarley Street, LondonHarley estate
Dr Bertold Paul Wiesner FRSE (1901–1972) was an Austrian Jewish physiologist noted firstly for coining the term 'Psi' to denote parapsychological phenomena; secondly for his contribution to research into human fertility and the diagnosis of pregnancy; and thirdly for being biological father to an estimated 600 offspring by anonymously donating sperm used by his wife the obstetrician Mary Barton to perform artificial insemination on women at her private practice in the Harley Street area of London, London, England.

Author

authorsauthorshipwriter
They had one daughter: the author Eva Ibbotson, born in 1925. Wiesner was briefly married to the Austrian author, playwright, and scriptwriter Anna Gmeyner.

Playwright

dramatistplaywritingplaywrights
Wiesner was briefly married to the Austrian author, playwright, and scriptwriter Anna Gmeyner.

Screenwriter

writertelevision writerscriptwriter
Wiesner was briefly married to the Austrian author, playwright, and scriptwriter Anna Gmeyner.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
The family moved to Scotland in 1926 when Wiesner accepted a post at the University of Edinburgh.

University of Edinburgh

Edinburgh UniversityEdinburghThe University of Edinburgh
The following year in 1928, Wiesner was appointed to the position of head of Sex Physiology by animal geneticist Francis Crew, Professor of Animal Genetics at the newly established Institute of Animal Genetics (IAG) established within the University of Edinburgh. The family moved to Scotland in 1926 when Wiesner accepted a post at the University of Edinburgh.

Naturalization

naturalizednaturalized citizennaturalised
He became a naturalized citizen in 1934.

Hormone

hormoneshormonalprohormone
During 1926 while Wiesner was still in Austria, he began investigating the role of hormones in regulating fertility and their impact on fetal development.