Skeletal formula of propranolol, the first clinically successful beta blocker
Ectopia lentis in Marfan syndrome: Zonular fibers are seen.
Dichloroisoprenaline, the first beta blocker
An anterior chest wall deformity, pectus excavatum, in a person with Marfan syndrome
Lens dislocation in Marfan syndrome with the lens being kidney-shaped and resting against the ciliary body
Marfan syndrome is inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern.
Micrograph demonstrating myxomatous degeneration of the aortic valve, a common manifestation of MFS
Thumb sign; upper: normal, lower: Marfan syndrome

Management often includes the use of beta blockers such as propranolol or atenolol or, if they are not tolerated, calcium channel blockers or ACE inhibitors.

- Marfan syndrome

Marfan syndrome (treatment with propranolol slows progression of aortic dilation and its complications)

- Beta blocker
Skeletal formula of propranolol, the first clinically successful beta blocker

2 related topics

Alpha

In mitral valve prolapse, the leaflets of the mitral valve prolapse back into the left atrium.

Mitral valve prolapse

Valvular heart disease characterized by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole.

Valvular heart disease characterized by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole.

In mitral valve prolapse, the leaflets of the mitral valve prolapse back into the left atrium.
Mitral valve prolapse can result in mitral regurgitation, shown here, in which blood abnormally flows from the left ventricle (1) back into the left atrium (2).
Micrograph demonstrating thickening of the spongiosa layer (blue) in myxomatous degeneration of the aortic valve. Movat's stain.
Transesophageal echocardiogram of mitral valve prolapse.
Mitral valve prolapse classification. Diagnosis of mitral valve prolapse is based on modern echocardiographic techniques which can pinpoint abnormal leaflet thickening and other related pathology.
Diagram of an inverted heart; note the concavity of the leaflets demonstrating valve prolapse: LV = left ventricle; LA = left atrium; RV = right ventricle; RA = right atrium.

MVP may occur with greater frequency in individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome or polycystic kidney disease.

Those with mitral valve prolapse and symptoms of dysautonomia (palpitations, chest pain) may benefit from beta-blockers (e.g., propranolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol).

Dissection of the descending part of the aorta (3), which starts from the left subclavian artery and extends to the abdominal aorta (4). The ascending aorta (1) and aortic arch (2) are not involved in this image.

Aortic dissection

Injury to the innermost layer of the aorta allows blood to flow between the layers of the aortic wall, forcing the layers apart.

Injury to the innermost layer of the aorta allows blood to flow between the layers of the aortic wall, forcing the layers apart.

Dissection of the descending part of the aorta (3), which starts from the left subclavian artery and extends to the abdominal aorta (4). The ascending aorta (1) and aortic arch (2) are not involved in this image.
Blood penetrates the intima and enters the media layer.
Histopathological image of dissecting aneurysm of the thoracic aorta in a patient without evidence of Marfan syndrome: The damaged aorta was surgically removed and replaced by artificial vessel, Victoria blue & HE stain.
Diagnostic algorithm of aortic dissection
Aortic dissection on CXR: Note is made of a wide aortic knob.
MRI of an aortic dissection
1 Aorta descendens with dissection
2 Aorta isthmus
Closure of the lumen of a Type B aortic dissection following medical management
CT with contrast demonstrating aneurysmal dilation and a dissection of the ascending aorta (type A Stanford)
Chest CT with descending (type B Stanford) aortic dissection (red circle)
Type A dissection with pericardial effusion as a result.

AD is more common in those with a history of high blood pressure; a number of connective tissue diseases that affect blood vessel wall strength including Marfan syndrome and Ehlers Danlos syndrome; a bicuspid aortic valve; and previous heart surgery.

Beta blockers are the first-line treatment for patients with acute and chronic aortic dissection.