Bethune photographed by Carl Van Vechten on April 6, 1949

In 1982, the BMA was designated a National Historic Site and its name changed to the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site.

- Bettye Collier-Thomas

Archivist and historian Bettye Collier-Thomas was hired to manage the house, which the NCNW and the city hoped to turn into a research archive and museum.

- Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site
Bethune photographed by Carl Van Vechten on April 6, 1949

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FedExField, the home field of the NFL's Washington Commanders.

National Archives for Black Women's History

Archive located at 3300 Hubbard Rd, Landover, Maryland.

Archive located at 3300 Hubbard Rd, Landover, Maryland.

FedExField, the home field of the NFL's Washington Commanders.

Originally housed at 1318 Vermont Avenue, Washington, D.C. in the carriage house of the former home of Mary McLeod Bethune, which is now a National Historic Site, the archive was controversially moved in 2014 by the National Park Service citing concerns over the inadequacy of the original site for preservation of its collection.

In the 1960s through the mid-1970s, work on the archive waned as the emphasis shifted to the Civil Rights Movement, but 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial celebrations, Senator John Warner, assisted in getting an appropriation from Congress to renovate the property where Bethune had last lived, located at 1318 Vermont Avenue, Washington, D.C. The following year, Bettye Collier-Thomas, director of Temple University's Center for African American History and Culture, established the Bethune Museum in the property and began converting the carriage house into a facility to house the National Archives for Black Women's History.