Bhūmi (Buddhism)

bhumibhūmifive pathsBhumi (Buddhism)bhūmisbhumisBodhisattva StagesanimittaBodhisattva Bhumisbodhisattva level
In Buddhism, Bhūmi (Sanskrit: भूमि 'foundation') is the 32nd and 33rd place (10th and 11th in simple count) on the outgoing's process of Mahayana awakening.wikipedia
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Mahayana

Mahayana BuddhismMahāyānaMahayana Buddhist
In Buddhism, Bhūmi (Sanskrit: भूमि 'foundation') is the 32nd and 33rd place (10th and 11th in simple count) on the outgoing's process of Mahayana awakening. This schema continues to be developed in Yogacara texts like Asanga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha (MS),'' where it is given a more Mahayanist explanation and becomes tied to the bodhisattva path and the bhūmis.
One reason for this view is that Mahāyāna sources are extremely diverse, advocating many different, often conflicting doctrines and positions, as Jan Nattier writes: Thus we find one scripture (the Aksobhyavyuha) that advocates both srávaka and bodhisattva practices, propounds the possibility of rebirth in a pure land, and enthusiastically recommends the cult of the book, yet seems to know nothing of emptiness theory, the ten bhumis, or the trikaya, while another (the P’u-sa pen-yeh ching) propounds the ten bhumis and focuses exclusively on the path of the bodhisattva, but never discusses the paramitas.

Ten Stages Sutra

Dasabhumika SutraDaśabhūmika SūtraDasabhumika
The Daśabhūmika Sūtra refers to the following ten bhūmis.
In the Daśabhūmika Sūtra, the Buddha describes ten stages of development that a bodhisattva must progress through in order to accomplish full Enlightenment and Buddhahood, as well as the subject of Buddha-nature and the awakening of the aspiration for Enlightenment.

Bodhisattva

BodhisattvasBoddhisattvaBoddhisatva
The ten bodhisattva stages are also called vihara ('dwelling'). Having overcome all attachments, bodhisattvas on this level can attain nirvana, but because of the force of the mind of awakening they decide to remain in the world in order to benefit other sentient beings. The eighth level is called the "Immovable" because bodhisattvas overcome all afflictions regarding signs and their minds are always completely absorbed in the dharma.
According to many traditions within Mahāyāna Buddhism, on the way to becoming a Buddha, a bodhisattva proceeds through ten, or sometimes fourteen, grounds or bhūmis. Below is the list of the ten bhūmis and their descriptions according to the Avataṃsaka Sūtra and The Jewel Ornament of Liberation, a treatise by Gampopa, an influential teacher of the Tibetan Kagyu school.

Yogachara

YogacaraYogācāraConsciousness-only
The Yogacara compendium of yogic praxis, the Yogācārabhūmi contains a subsection on the bodhisattva path (the Bodhisattvabhūmi), which lists six bhūmis:
Yogācāra philosophy is primarily meant to aid in the practice of yoga and meditation and thus it also sets forth a systematic analysis of the Mahayana spiritual path (see five paths pañcamārga).

Yogacarabhumi-sastra

Yogācārabhūmi-śāstraYogācārabhūmi ŚāstraYogācārabhūmi
The Yogacara compendium of yogic praxis, the Yogācārabhūmi contains a subsection on the bodhisattva path (the Bodhisattvabhūmi), which lists six bhūmis:
*Maulyo Bhūmayaḥ, Ch. 本地分 Běn dì fēn, Tib. Sa'i dngos gzhi) and contains fourteen books that describe the successive seventeen levels (bhūmi), which cover the entire range of mental and spiritual stages of practice in Mahayana Buddhism.

Anutpada

anutpādanon-arisen phenomenaUnborn
They attain the meditative state called "forbearance regarding non-arisen phenomena", due to which they no longer think in terms of inherent causes or inherent causelessness.
According to Nakamura in his study of Advaita Vedanta, the Buddhist paramārtha, "highest truth", is identified with anutpāda The term paramārtha is a synonym for tattva, tathata, sunyata, animitta, bhutakoti and dharmadhatu.

Prajnaparamita

PrajñāpāramitāPerfection of Wisdomprajñaparamita
They cultivate the Perfection of Wisdom, through which they perceive all phenomena as lacking inherent existence, as being like dreams, illusions, reflections, or magically created objects.

Mahāyānasaṃgraha

Mahāyāna-samgrahaMahayana-samgrahaMahayanasamgraha
This schema continues to be developed in Yogacara texts like Asanga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha (MS),'' where it is given a more Mahayanist explanation and becomes tied to the bodhisattva path and the bhūmis.
Asanga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha expounds the major doctrines of the Mahayana Yogacara school such as the ālayavijñāna (storehouse consciousness), the 'three forms of existence' (trisvabhāva), the five paths (pañcamārga) and the Dharmakaya.

Darśana

darshandarshanaDarsana
Indian Mahayana philosophers Vasubandhu and Asanga acknowledged five paths to liberation, of which the third is darśana-marga, the "path of seeing".

Four Noble Truths

The Four Noble Truthstrutharises
They also fully penetrate the meanings of the four noble truths and the two truths (conventional truths and ultimate truths) and perceive all phenomena as empty, transient and prone to suffering.
The truth of the path (the fourth truth) is traditionally presented according to a progressive formula of five paths, rather than as the eightfold path presented in Theravada.

Buddhist paths to liberation

maggaPathmarga
* Buddhist Paths to liberation
The four yogas of Mahāmudrā have also been correlated with the Mahāyāna five Bhumi paths.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
In Buddhism, Bhūmi (Sanskrit: भूमि 'foundation') is the 32nd and 33rd place (10th and 11th in simple count) on the outgoing's process of Mahayana awakening.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
In Buddhism, Bhūmi (Sanskrit: भूमि 'foundation') is the 32nd and 33rd place (10th and 11th in simple count) on the outgoing's process of Mahayana awakening.

Monk

monksmonasticBrother
Buddhist monks who arrived at Bhūmi were originally called śrāvakas, in opposition to Brahminism.

Brahminism

Brahmin OrthodoxyBrahminBrahminic
Buddhist monks who arrived at Bhūmi were originally called śrāvakas, in opposition to Brahminism.

Śakra (Buddhism)

ŚakraSakkaSakra
Śakro devānām and Trāyastriṃśa are together called "Bhūmi nivāsin".

Trāyastriṃśa

TavatimsaTrayastrimsaTāvatiṃsa
Śakro devānām and Trāyastriṃśa are together called "Bhūmi nivāsin".

Sentient beings (Buddhism)

sentient beingsliving beingssentient being
Having overcome all attachments, bodhisattvas on this level can attain nirvana, but because of the force of the mind of awakening they decide to remain in the world in order to benefit other sentient beings.

Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
The eighth level is called the "Immovable" because bodhisattvas overcome all afflictions regarding signs and their minds are always completely absorbed in the dharma.

Je Tsongkhapa

TsongkhapaTsong KhapaTsongkapa
According to Tsong Khapa, first level bodhisattvas directly understand that persons do not exist by way of their own nature.

Faith in Buddhism

faithsaddhāsaddha
Despite having directly and correctly perceived emptiness, bodhisattvas on the first level are primarily motivated by faith.

Brahmavihara

Brahma-viharabrahmavihāraFour Divine Abidings
Bodhisattvas on this level also train in the four form meditations, the four formless meditations, and the four immeasurables, and the higher knowledges.

Abhijñā

psychic powersmeditative visionAbhijna
Bodhisattvas on this level also train in the four form meditations, the four formless meditations, and the four immeasurables, and the higher knowledges.