Bhagavata Purana

BhagavataŚrīmad BhāgavatamSrimad BhagavatamSrimad-BhagavatamŚrīmadbhāgavataBhagavatamBhagavathaShrimadbhagwatSrimad BhagavathamAndhra Mahabhagavatam
Bhagavata Purana (Devanagari: भागवतपुराण; ) also known as Śrīmad Bhāgavata Mahā Purāṇa, Śrīmad Bhāgavatam or Bhāgavata, is one of Hinduism's eighteen great Puranas (Mahapuranas, great histories).wikipedia
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Krishna

Lord KrishnaSri KrishnaShri Krishna
Composed in Sanskrit and available in almost all Indian languages, it promotes bhakti (devotion) to Krishna integrating themes from the Advaita (monism) philosophy and from the Dvaita (dualism) philosophy. Other teachers such as Narada and Shukadeva described in the Purana, however, present Bhakti with less prominence, and emphasize Advaita philosophy and Jnana yoga instead but then add that adoring Hari (Krishna) has the same liberating benefits. Near the Yamuna River Vidura meets Uddhava, who gives him the news of the Kurukshetra War and about Krishna's death in chapter 1 of Book 3 (this is described in greater detail in chapters 30 and 31 of Book 11 as well).
He is a central character in the Mahabharata, the Bhagavata Purana and the Bhagavad Gita, and is mentioned in many Hindu philosophical, theological, and mythological texts.

Bhakti

bhaktadevoteedevotion
Composed in Sanskrit and available in almost all Indian languages, it promotes bhakti (devotion) to Krishna integrating themes from the Advaita (monism) philosophy and from the Dvaita (dualism) philosophy.
The Bhagavata Purana, for example, is a Krishna-related text associated with the Bhakti movement in Hinduism.

Vaishnavism

VaishnavaVaishnaviteVaishnavaite
The Bhagavata Purana is a revered text in Vaishnavism, a Hindu tradition that reveres Vishnu.
Key texts in Vaishnavism include the Vedas, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Pancaratra (Agama) texts and the Bhagavata Purana.

Puranas

PuranicpuranaPuran
Bhagavata Purana (Devanagari: भागवतपुराण; ) also known as Śrīmad Bhāgavata Mahā Purāṇa, Śrīmad Bhāgavatam or Bhāgavata, is one of Hinduism's eighteen great Puranas (Mahapuranas, great histories). The Bhagavata is widely recognized as the best-known and most influential of the Puranas and, along with the Itihasa and other puranas, is sometimes referred to as the "Fifth Veda".
The Bhagavata Purana has been among the most celebrated and popular text in the Puranic genre, and is of non-dualistic tenor.

Holi

Phāgu PurnimāPhagwahHoli Festival
It is the source of many popular stories of Krishna's childhood told for centuries on the Indian subcontinent and of legends explaining Hindu festivals such as Holi and Diwali.
King Hiranyakashipu, according to a legend found in chapter 7 of Bhagavata Purana, was the king of demonic Asuras, and had earned a boon that gave him five special powers: he could be killed by neither a human being nor an animal, neither indoors nor outdoors, neither at day nor at night, neither by astra (projectile weapons) nor by any shastra (handheld weapons), and neither on land nor in water or air.

Chaitanya Mahaprabhu

ChaitanyaSri ChaitanyaSri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu
The text has played a significant role in Chaitanya's Krishna-bhakti in Bengal, and in the 15th–16th century Ekasarana Dharma in Assam, a panentheistic tradition whose proponents, Sankardeva and Madhavdeva, acknowledge that their theological positions are rooted in the Bhagavata Purana, purged of doctrines that find no place in Assamese Vaishnavism and adding a monist commentary instead.
He also expounded the Vaishnava school of Bhakti yoga (meaning loving devotion to God), based on Bhagavata Purana and Bhagavad Gita.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu religion
Bhagavata Purana (Devanagari: भागवतपुराण; ) also known as Śrīmad Bhāgavata Mahā Purāṇa, Śrīmad Bhāgavatam or Bhāgavata, is one of Hinduism's eighteen great Puranas (Mahapuranas, great histories).
Varying lists of avatars of Vishnu appear in Hindu scriptures, including the ten Dashavatara of the Garuda Purana and the twenty-two avatars in the Bhagavata Purana, though the latter adds that the incarnations of Vishnu are innumerable.

Fifth Veda

Pranava Veda
The Bhagavata is widely recognized as the best-known and most influential of the Puranas and, along with the Itihasa and other puranas, is sometimes referred to as the "Fifth Veda".
The Bhagavata Purana elaborates on the Chandogya Upanishad's statement concerning the fifth, by stating that after the four Vedas emerged from each of Brahma's four mouths, the fifth Veda - itihasapurana - emerged from his fifth mouth or all his mouths.

Bhagavan

BhagavatBhagavānGod
Bhagavata means "devoted to, follower of Bhagavat – the "sacred, divine (God, Lord)". An alternative interpretation of Bhagavata is "devotees of the Adorable One". Bhagavata Purana therefore means "Ancient Tales of Followers of the Lord".
The Bhagavata Purana (I.iii.28) identifies Krishna as Narayana, Vāsudeva, Vishnu and Hari – Bhagavan present in human form.

Brahma

Lord BrahmaBrahmāNathan
While the text focuses on Krishna "Lord Narayana (Vishnu) himself appears and explains how Brahma and Shiva should never be seen as independent and different from him".
In the Bhagavata Purana, Brahma is portrayed several times as the one who rises from the "Ocean of Causes".

Rukmini

RakhumaiDevi RukminiRakumai
The Bhagavata also suggests that the poorest can do bhakti, with Krishna saying to Rukmini in chapter 10.60, "we are poor and we are always the favourites of poor persons."
Krishna heroically kidnapped her and eloped with her to prevent an unwanted marriage at her request and saved her from evil Shishupala (described in the Bhagavata Purana).

Rishabhanatha

AdinathAdinathaRishabha
The fifth book of the Bhagavata Purana is significant in its inclusion of homage and many chapters of legends about the Tirthankaras of Jainism particularly Rishabha, while homage to Buddha is included in various chapters by declaring him as one of avatars of Vishnu.
The Yajurveda mentions the name of three Tirthankaras – Rishabha, Ajitanatha and Arishtanemi, states Radhakrishnan, and "the Bhāgavata Purāṇa endorses the view that Rishabha was the founder of Jainism".

Yoga

yogicyogitantric
The Bhagavata Purana, discusses a wide range of topics including Cosmology, Genealogy, Geography, Mythology, legend, Music, Dance, Yoga and Culture.
Bhagavata Purana elucidates the practice of a form of yoga called viraha (separation) bhakti.

Sankardev

SankardevaSrimanta SankaradevaSrimanta Sankardev
The text has played a significant role in Chaitanya's Krishna-bhakti in Bengal, and in the 15th–16th century Ekasarana Dharma in Assam, a panentheistic tradition whose proponents, Sankardeva and Madhavdeva, acknowledge that their theological positions are rooted in the Bhagavata Purana, purged of doctrines that find no place in Assamese Vaishnavism and adding a monist commentary instead.
Soon after, he received a copy of the Bhagavata Purana from Jagadisa Mishra of Mithila, with Sridhara Swami's monistic commentary "Bhavartha-dipika".

Shuka

ŚukaSukaSri Shuka Acharya
Other teachers such as Narada and Shukadeva described in the Purana, however, present Bhakti with less prominence, and emphasize Advaita philosophy and Jnana yoga instead but then add that adoring Hari (Krishna) has the same liberating benefits.
Shuka (also Shukadeva, Shuka deva, Suka, Sukadev, Śukadeva Gosvāmī) was the son of the sage Vyasa (credited as the organizer of the Vedas and Puranas) and the main narrator of the Bhagavata Purana.

Deva (Hinduism)

DevasDevagods
As it begins, the forces of evil have won a war between the benevolent devas (deities) and evil asuras (demons) and now rule the universe.
In Bhagavata Purana, Brahma had ten sons: Marici, Atri, Angira, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, Vasistha, Daksa, Narada.

Kapila

Kapil MuniKapila MuniLord Kapila
The Purana presents seven teachers and their hagiographic stories—describing for example Kapila, the Samkhya philosopher, as someone who was born as a full grown adult, who teaches his mother that to reach liberation, she must have bhakti, jnana (wisdom), and vairagya (dispassion), with bhakti being the most important.
As Vishnu's incarnation: The Narada Purana enumerates two Kapilas, one as the incarnation of Brahma and another as the incarnation of Vishnu. The Puranas Bhagavata, Brahmanda, Vishnu, Padma, Skanda, Narada Purana; and the Valmiki Ramayana mentions Kapila is an incarnation of Vishnu. The Padma Purana and Skanda Purana conclusively call him Vishnu himself who descended on earth to disseminate true knowledge. Bhagavata Purana calls him Vedagarbha Vishnu. The Vishnusahasranama mentions Kapila as a name of Vishnu. In his commentary on the Samkhyasutra, Vijnanabhikshu mentions Kapila, the founder of Samkhya system, is Vishnu. Jacobsen suggests Kapila of the Veda, Śramaṇa tradition and the Mahabharata is the same person as Kapila the founder of Samkhya; and this individual is considered as an incarnation of Vishnu in the Hindu texts.

Prahlada

PrahaladPrahladBhakt Prahlad
The text, in Book 7, describes the legend of a bhagavata (devotee) named Prahlada.
A treatise is accredited to him in the Bhagavata Purana in which Prahlāda describes the process of loving worship to his Lord Vishnu.

Maya (religion)

Mayamāyāillusion
It describes Brahman, or Bhagavan, as creating all beings within his Self in latent form—then, on its own initiative, bringing itself into Maya and falling " under the influence of its own power".
The Bhagavata Purana narrates that the sage Markandeya requests Vishnu to experience his māyā.

Srimad Bhagavata Book 3

Book 3
Vidura's pilgrimage to various holy places provides the backdrop for the stories and spiritual teachings in Book 3.
The Srimad Bhagavata is one of the main books of Hindu philosophy.

Alvars

AzhwarAlvaralwars
The text contains more details of Krishna's biography than the 3rd- 4th-century Harivamsha and Vishnu Purana, and is therefore likely to have been composed after these texts, suggesting a chronological range of 500–1000 CE. Within this range, scholars such as R. C. Hazra date it to the first half of the 6th century CE, Bryant as well as Gupta and Valpey citing epigraphical and archaeological evidence suggest much of the text could be from the 4th to 7th century, while most others place it in the post-Alvar period around the 9th century.
Traditional dates take them to the age of Shuka from the period of the Bhagavata Purana, many are from Dwaparayuga, while Nammalwar belongs to the early part of Kaliyuga.

Madhavdev

MadhavadevaMadhavdevaMahapurukh Madhabdev
The text has played a significant role in Chaitanya's Krishna-bhakti in Bengal, and in the 15th–16th century Ekasarana Dharma in Assam, a panentheistic tradition whose proponents, Sankardeva and Madhavdeva, acknowledge that their theological positions are rooted in the Bhagavata Purana, purged of doctrines that find no place in Assamese Vaishnavism and adding a monist commentary instead.
The debate continued for four and a half hour, when Sankardev uttered a sloka from the Bhagavata Purana.

Ugrashravas

SutaSri Suta GoswamiUgraśrava Sauti
The Bhagavata describes itself as a recounting of events by the storyteller Ugrasrava Sauti (Sūta) to Shaunaka and other sages assembled in the Naimisha Forest.
Ugrashravas (Sanskrit: उग्रश्रवस, also Ugrasravas, Sauti, Suta, Sri Suta, Suta Goswami) was the narrator of several Puranas, including Mahābhārata, Bhagavata Purana, Harivamsa, and Padma Purana, with the narrations typically taking place before the sages gathered in Naimisha Forest.

Uddhava

Uddhava GitaUdhhava
Near the Yamuna River Vidura meets Uddhava, who gives him the news of the Kurukshetra War and about Krishna's death in chapter 1 of Book 3 (this is described in greater detail in chapters 30 and 31 of Book 11 as well).
He plays a significant role in the Bhagavata Purana, being taught the processes of yoga and bhakti directly by Krishna.

Dhruva

DhruvDhuruva
The legend of Dhruva's penance and devotion to Vishnu is also recounted, along with the related story of king Prithu.
Dhruva (ध्रुव "constant, immovable, fixed") is a devotee of Vishnu mentioned in the Vishnu Purana and the Bhagavata Purana.