Latina in Khajuraho
11th-century Nilakanthesvara (Udayesvara) temple in north Madhya Pradesh is the best example of Bhumija style.
Homogeneous Shikhara (but with rathas) of the Lingaraja Temple in Bhubaneswar
The square and circle plan applied together
Bhand Deva temple, Rajasthan
Two Bhumija temples, Narmada river (Omkareshwar temples, Mandhata)
Bhand Deul (Jain), Arang, Chhattisgarh
Palasdev temple, Maharashtra (between Pune and Solapur)
Sadashiva Temple (1249 CE) at Nuggehalli, Karnataka
Small Bhumija-style shrines flanking the step before the main Belur temple, Karnakata
The Bhumija shikara of Galteshwar Temple

Bhumija is a variety of north Indian temple architecture marked by how the rotating square-circle principle is applied to construct the shikhara (superstructure or spire) on top of the sanctum.

- Bhumija

Bhumija. The tower has miniature spires, in horizontal and vertical rows, all the way to the top, creating a grid-like effect on each face. The tower is generally less strongly vertical in overall shape, often approaching a pyramidal shape. Mainly found in the northern Deccan and West India.

- Shikhara
Latina in Khajuraho

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Temple

Shiv Mandir, Ambarnath

Historic 11th-century Hindu temple, still in use, at Ambarnath near Mumbai, in Maharashtra, India.

Historic 11th-century Hindu temple, still in use, at Ambarnath near Mumbai, in Maharashtra, India.

Temple
From the side, showing the truncated shikhara at left and a side porch.
Udayesvara Temple in Udaipur, Madhya Pradesh

Unusually, the sanctuary or garbhagriha is below ground, reached by some 20 steps down from the mandapa, and is open to the sky as the shikhara tower above stops abruptly at a little above the height of the mandapa, and was apparently never completed.

It is in bhumija form, and if completed would have been close in form to the Udayesvara Temple also known as Neelkantheshwara temple in Udaipur, Madhya Pradesh, begun in 1059, and the Gondeshwar Temple at Sinnar.