Bias

biasesunbiasedbiasedcausecognitive biasescognitive orientationcultural assumptionsdifferential treatmentfavouritismgender bias
Bias is disproportionate weight in favor of or against an idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed-minded, prejudicial, or unfair.wikipedia
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Confirmation bias

Backfire effectdisconfirmation biasconfirmation
Biased search, interpretation and memory have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence), belief perseverance (when beliefs persist after the evidence for them is shown to be false), the irrational primacy effect (a greater reliance on information encountered early in a series) and illusory correlation (when people falsely perceive an association between two events or situations).
People display this bias when they gather or remember information selectively, or when they interpret it in a biased way.

Bowls

lawn bowlslawn bowlerlawn and indoor bowler
It seems to have entered English via the game of bowls, where it referred to balls made with a greater weight on one side.
Bowls are designed to travel a curved path because of a weight bias which was originally produced by inserting weights in one side of the bowl.

Justice

justequitycivil justice
Numerous such biases exist, concerning cultural norms for color, location of body parts, mate selection, concepts of justice, linguistic and logical validity, acceptability of evidence, and taboos.

Evaluation

evaluateevaluativeevaluating
Confirmation bias is the tendency to search for, interpret, favor, and recall information in a way that confirms one's beliefs or hypotheses while giving disproportionately less attention to information that contradicts it.

Schema (psychology)

schemaschemasschemata
As understood in social theory, framing is a schema of interpretation, a collection of anecdotes and stereotypes, that individuals rely on to understand and respond to events.
However, schemata can influence and hamper the uptake of new information (proactive interference), such as when existing stereotypes, giving rise to limited or biased discourses and expectations (prejudices), lead an individual to "see" or "remember" something that has not happened because it is more believable in terms of his/her schema.

Decision-making

decision makingdecisionsdecision
Anchoring is a psychological heuristic that describes the propensity to rely on the first piece of information encountered when making decisions.
Biases usually affect decision-making processes.

Blinded experiment

double-blinddouble blindblinded
It is usually controlled using a double-blind system, and was an important reason for the development of double-blind experiments.
Good blinding can reduce or eliminate experimental biases that arise from a participants' expectations, observer's effect on the participants, observer bias, confirmation bias, and other sources.

Actor–observer asymmetry

Actor-observer biasactor–observer biasactor-observer asymmetry
There are a wide range of sorts of attribution biases, such as the ultimate attribution error, fundamental attribution error, actor-observer bias, and self-serving bias.
The term "bias" is typically used to imply that one of the explainers (either the actor or the observer) is biased or incorrect in their explanations.

Evidence

evidentiarydisproveevident
Numerous such biases exist, concerning cultural norms for color, location of body parts, mate selection, concepts of justice, linguistic and logical validity, acceptability of evidence, and taboos.
The rules for evidence used by science are collected systematically in an attempt to avoid the bias inherent to anecdotal evidence.

Publication bias

File drawer problemfile drawer effectself-selecting nature of the positive reports
Examples of experimenter bias include conscious or unconscious influences on subject behavior including creation of demand characteristics that influence subjects, and altered or selective recording of experimental results themselves.
Publication bias is a type of bias that occurs in published academic research.

Sexual orientation

sexualitysexual preferenceorientation
The word is often used to refer to preconceived, usually unfavorable, judgments toward people or a person because of gender, political opinion, social class, age, disability, religion, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, nationality, or other personal characteristics.
Some researchers advocate use of the terminology to avoid bias inherent in Western conceptualizations of human sexuality.

Concentration of media ownership

media concentrationmedia consolidationmedia ownership
Practical limitations to media neutrality include the inability of journalists to report all available stories and facts, the requirement that selected facts be linked into a coherent narrative, government influence including overt and covert censorship, the influence of the owners of the news source, concentration of media ownership, the selection of staff, the preferences of an intended audience, and pressure from advertisers.
Such negative effects that could come into play are lack of competition and diversity as well as biased political views.

Scientific control

controlcontrolscontrolled
It is usually controlled using a double-blind system, and was an important reason for the development of double-blind experiments.
Blinding is the practice of withholding information which may bias an experiment.

Scientific community

research communityscientific communitiesscience community
Academic bias is the bias or perceived bias of scholars allowing their beliefs to shape their research and the scientific community.
Sometimes it is argued that there is a closed shop bias within the scientific community toward new ideas.

Racial profiling

profilingethnic profilingracially profiled
Driving while black refers to the racial profiling of African American drivers.
Supporters uphold the stance that sacrifices must be made in order to maintain national safety, even if it warrants differential treatment.

Statistics

statisticalstatistical analysisstatistician
It is a property of a statistical technique or of its results whereby the expected value of the results differs from the true underlying quantitative parameter being estimated.
Many of these errors are classified as random (noise) or systematic (bias), but other types of errors (e.g., blunder, such as when an analyst reports incorrect units) can also be important.

Open-mindedness

closed mindopen-mindedclosed-minded
Bias is disproportionate weight in favor of or against an idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed-minded, prejudicial, or unfair.

Prejudice

bigotrybigotbigoted
Bias is disproportionate weight in favor of or against an idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed-minded, prejudicial, or unfair.

Observational error

systematic errormeasurement errorsystematic bias
In science and engineering, a bias is a systematic error.

Bias (statistics)

biasbiasedstatistical bias
Statistical bias results from an unfair sampling of a population, or from an estimation process that does not give accurate results on average.

Sample (statistics)

samplesamplesstatistical sample
Statistical bias results from an unfair sampling of a population, or from an estimation process that does not give accurate results on average.

Estimation

estimateestimatedestimating
Statistical bias results from an unfair sampling of a population, or from an estimation process that does not give accurate results on average.

Old Occitan

OccitanOld ProvençalProvençal
The word probably derives from Old Provençal into Old French biais, "sideways, askance, against the grain".

Old French

FrenchMedieval FrenchOF
The word probably derives from Old Provençal into Old French biais, "sideways, askance, against the grain".

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Whence comes French biais, "a slant, a slope, an oblique".