Bill Donovan

Donovan in 1910
New York Mayor J.P. Michel, Jacob Ruppert and Donovan in 1915

American right-handed baseball pitcher and manager.

- Bill Donovan

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Detroit Tigers

American professional baseball team based in Detroit.

American professional baseball team based in Detroit.

1900 Detroit Tigers team photo
Logo (1901 to 1902)
Ty Cobb in 1913
1908 World Series program
Hank Greenberg
Hal Newhouser
Hall of Fame member Al Kaline, nicknamed "Mr. Tiger" (1953–1974), was an 18× All-Star
1968 World Series program and tickets for Games 4 and 5 at Tiger Stadium
Mickey Lolich was the 1968 World Series MVP
Willie Horton (1963–1977) had his No. 23 retired by the club
Mark "The Bird" Fidrych, 1976 AL Rookie of the Year
Sparky Anderson was the manager of the Tigers from 1979 to 1995
Kirk Gibson, a Michigan State alumni, hit the clinching home run in Game 5 of the 1984 World Series
1984 World Series MVP, Alan Trammell (SS)
Cecil Fielder in 1996
The entrance sign of Comerica Park
Magglio Ordóñez hit a walk-off home run to clinch the 2006 AL pennant
Curtis Granderson in 2007
Justin Verlander, June 2008
Alex Avila, March 2010
In 2012, Miguel Cabrera became the first Major League player to win the Triple Crown in 45 years.
Delmon Young (left) and Prince Fielder (right) in 2012
Jim Leyland, manager from 2006 to 2013
Tiger Stadium, home of the Detroit Tigers from 1912 to 1999 at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull Avenues in the Corktown district of Detroit
Tigers opening day 2007; view from section 324 at Comerica Park
Outfielder Ron LeFlore wearing the traditional Tigers home uniform with navy blue piping down the front and an Old English "D" on the left chest
Mickey Cochrane
Sam Crawford
Charlie Gehringer
Harry Heilmann
George Kell
Lou Whitaker
Ernie Harwell (Tigers broadcaster: 1960–2002)

The addition of Cobb to an already talented team that included Sam Crawford, Hughie Jennings, Bill Donovan and George Mullin quickly yielded results.

Ruth in 1920

Babe Ruth

American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935.

American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935.

Ruth in 1920
Ruth's birthplace in Baltimore, Maryland, is now a museum.
George Herman Ruth Sr. family in the 1900 US Census
Baseball card showing Ruth as a Baltimore Oriole, 1914
Ruth pitching for the Boston Red Sox
Providence Grays with Babe Ruth (top row, center), 1914
Ruth during batting practice in 1916.
Ruth in 1918, his penultimate year with the Red Sox
Ruth in 1919
Ruth in his first year with the New York Yankees, 1920
"How Does He Do It?" In this Clifford Berryman cartoon, presidential candidates Warren G. Harding and James M. Cox wonder at Ruth's record home run pace.
Ruth and Shoeless Joe Jackson looking at one of Babe's home run bats, 1920
Ruth in the stands on Opening Day, April 12, 1922, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C.
Ruth after losing consciousness from running into the wall at Griffith Stadium during a game against the Washington Senators on July 5, 1924. Ruth insisted on staying in the game, despite evident pain and a bruised pelvic bone, and hit a double in his next at-bat. Note the absence of a warning track along the outfield wall.
Ruth took time off in 1927 to star with Anna Q. Nilsson in this First National silent production Babe Comes Home. This film is now lost.
Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Ruth, 1928
1933 Goudey Sport Kings baseball card
Gary Cooper and Ruth in the 1942 film The Pride of the Yankees
Ruth and his first wife, Helen Woodford, 1915
The Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of Ruth by Nat Fein
Tribute to Babe Ruth, Monument Park, as seen at the original Yankee Stadium
The unveiling of a Babe Ruth memorial plaque in Baltimore's old Memorial Stadium in 1955 with Claire Ruth, his widow, present.
Ruth memorabilia at the Baseball Hall of Fame (2014)

Ruth was deeply impressed by Providence manager "Wild Bill" Donovan, previously a star pitcher with a 25–4 win–loss record for Detroit in 1907; in later years, he credited Donovan with teaching him much about pitching.

Huggins with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1910

Miller Huggins

American professional baseball player and manager.

American professional baseball player and manager.

Huggins with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1910
Miller Huggins' 1909 baseball card
Huggins with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1912
Huggins with the Yankees in 1922
The monument dedicated to Huggins by the New York Yankees in Monument Park

With the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) not performing well, Yankees owners Jacob Ruppert and Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston sought to replace "Wild" Bill Donovan as manager.

Huston at the opening of Yankee Stadium, April 18, 1923

Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston

American civil engineer and businessman.

American civil engineer and businessman.

Huston at the opening of Yankee Stadium, April 18, 1923
Huston in 1910
Huston (left) with Bill Donovan
From left, Jacob Ruppert, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Tillinghast Huston, Harry Frazee, and Edward J. Flynn at the opening of Yankee Stadium
Huston House on Butler Island Plantation

Bill Donovan was hired to manage the team.

Ray Tift

American professional baseball pitcher.

American professional baseball pitcher.

In Tift's third appearance he again relieved Doyle, and reached base himself after being hit by a Bill Donovan pitch, but the Highlanders suffered a 13-6 shellacking at the hands of the Detroit Tigers and Hall of Famers Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford at Bennett Park.

Doc McJames

Professional baseball player.

Professional baseball player.

This team included such baseball legends as John McGraw, Willie Keeler, Hughie Jennings, and Wild Bill Donovan.

Samuel F. Angus

American business owner and professional sports team owner.

American business owner and professional sports team owner.

During Angus's ownership, the team began the tradition of training in the south and acquired stars "Wild Bill" Donovan and "Wahoo Sam" Crawford, whose services would be key to the 1907 American League championship team.

Boss Schmidt

1909 Detroit Tigers season

The 1909 Detroit Tigers won the American League pennant with a record of 98–54, but lost to the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1909 World Series, 4 games to 3.

The 1909 Detroit Tigers won the American League pennant with a record of 98–54, but lost to the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1909 World Series, 4 games to 3.

Boss Schmidt
George Moriarty
Germany Schaefer
Charley O'Leary
Cobb stealing third in 1909
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Ralph Works
Ed Willett
Hughie Jennings with horn in the Tigers dugout
Davy Jones
Claude Rossman
Jim Delahanty
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Heinie Beckendorf, Cabanas Cuban Baseball Card
Sam Crawford pursues a fly ball

Bill Donovan was the Tigers ace in 1907 with a 25–4 record (the best win percentage in Tigers' team history), but in 1909 he went 8–7 in 17 starts.

First/given/forename, middle, and last/family/surname with John Fitzgerald Kennedy as example. This shows a structure typical for Anglophonic cultures (and some others). Other cultures use other structures for full names.

Donovan (name)

Irish surname and given name.

Irish surname and given name.

First/given/forename, middle, and last/family/surname with John Fitzgerald Kennedy as example. This shows a structure typical for Anglophonic cultures (and some others). Other cultures use other structures for full names.

Bill Donovan (1876–1923), American baseball player and manager

Peckinpaugh with the Washington Senators in 1924

Roger Peckinpaugh

American professional baseball player shortstop and manager.

American professional baseball player shortstop and manager.

Peckinpaugh with the Washington Senators in 1924
Peckinpaugh (left) with Larry Doyle (right) of the New York Giants
Peckinpaugh with the New York Yankees
Peckinpaugh tagged out at home in the mid-1920s

Bill Donovan was hired as the Yankees manager in the offseason.