Billie Holiday

Lady DayHolidayBillieHoliday, BillieEleanora FaganBillie HollidayBilly HolidayB. HolidayDuke Ellington, Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, Count BasieElenora Fagan
Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), better known as Billie Holiday, was an African American jazz singer with a career spanning nearly thirty years.wikipedia
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Lady in Satin

Her final album, Lady in Satin, was released in 1958.
Lady in Satin is an album by jazz singer Billie Holiday released in 1958 on Columbia Records, catalogue CL 1157 in mono and CS 8048 in stereo.

Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazz
Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), better known as Billie Holiday, was an African American jazz singer with a career spanning nearly thirty years.
Although Betty Carter, Ella Fitzgerald, Adelaide Hall, Billie Holiday, Abbey Lincoln, Anita O'Day, Dinah Washington, and Ethel Waters were recognized for their vocal talent, less familiar were bandleaders, composers, and instrumentalists such as pianist Lil Hardin Armstrong and songwriters Irene Higginbotham and Dorothy Fields.

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Lady DayLady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill
She is the primary character in the play (later made into a film) Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill; the role was originated by Reenie Upchurch in 1986, and was played by Audra McDonald on Broadway and in the film.
Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill is a play with music by Lanie Robertson, recounting some events in the life of Billie Holiday.

Teddy Wilson

Teddy Wilson QuartetTeddy Wilson TrioThe Teddy Wilson Trio
Collaborations with Teddy Wilson yielded the hit "What a Little Moonlight Can Do", which became a jazz standard.
Described by critic Scott Yanow as "the definitive swing pianist", Wilson's sophisticated and elegant style was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald.

Lady Sings the Blues (film)

Lady Sings the Blues1972 movieLady Sings the Blues (1972)
Lady Sings the Blues, a film about her life, starring Diana Ross, was released in 1972.
Lady Sings the Blues is a 1972 American biographical drama film directed by Sidney J. Furie about jazz singer Billie Holiday, loosely based on her 1956 autobiography which, in turn, took its title from one of Holiday's most popular songs.

Baltimore

Baltimore, MarylandBaltimore, MDBaltimore City
Sarah moved to Philadelphia aged 19, after she was evicted from her parents' home in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland for becoming pregnant.
Famous residents have included writers Edgar Allan Poe, Edith Hamilton, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ogden Nash, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dashiell Hammett, Upton Sinclair, Tom Clancy, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and H. L. Mencken; musicians James "Eubie" Blake, Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Tori Amos, Frank Zappa, Tupac Shakur, Robbie Basho, Bill Frisell, Philip Glass, and Ric Ocasek; actors and filmmakers John Waters, Barry Levinson, Divine, David Hasselhoff, Don Messick, John Kassir, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Mo'Nique; artist Jeff Koons; baseball player Babe Ruth; swimmer Michael Phelps; radio host Ira Glass; Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall; Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi; and United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson.

What a Little Moonlight Can Do

Collaborations with Teddy Wilson yielded the hit "What a Little Moonlight Can Do", which became a jazz standard. Their first collaboration included "What a Little Moonlight Can Do" and "Miss Brown to You".
The song was sung in the film by Violet Lorraine and included an introductory verse, not heard in the version later recorded by Billie Holiday in 1935.

Lady Sings the Blues (book)

Lady Sings the Blues1956 autobiographyLady Sings the Blues'' (book)
Holiday's autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues, first published in 1956, is sketchy on details of her early life, but much was confirmed by Stuart Nicholson in his 1995 biography of the singer.
Lady Sings the Blues (1956) is an autobiography by jazz singer Billie Holiday, which was co-authored by William Dufty.

Columbia Records

ColumbiaCBSCBS Records
Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Holiday had mainstream success on labels such as Columbia and Decca. Holiday was recording for Columbia in the late 1930s when she was introduced to "Strange Fruit", a song based on a poem about lynching written by Abel Meeropol, a Jewish schoolteacher from the Bronx.
Artists who have recorded for Columbia include AC/DC, Adele, Aerosmith, Louis Armstrong, Gene Autry, Count Basie, Nora Bayes, Bix Beiderbecke, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Beyoncé, Blue Öyster Cult, Dave Brubeck, The Byrds, Mariah Carey, Pablo Casals, Johnny Cash, The Clash, The Cleveland Orchestra, Rosemary Clooney, Leonard Cohen, Ornette Coleman, Elvis Costello, Miles Davis, Neil Diamond, Celine Dion, Bob Dylan, Earth, Wind & Fire, Duke Ellington, 50 Cent, Flatt and Scruggs, Erroll Garner, Benny Goodman, Glenn Gould, Adelaide Hall, Herbie Hancock, Lauryn Hill, Billie Holiday, Vladimir Horowitz, Billy Joel, Blind Willie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Al Jolson, Janis Joplin, Andre Kostelanetz, Yo-Yo Ma, Johnny Mathis, John Mayer, George Michael, Mitch Miller, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Billy Murray, Willie Nelson, The New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Pink Floyd, Santana, Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, Bessie Smith, John Philip Sousa, Bruce Springsteen, Igor Stravinsky, Barbra Streisand, System of a Down, James Taylor, Bonnie Tyler, Ethel Waters, Weather Report, Paul Whiteman, Andy Williams, Bert Williams, Pharrell Williams, Bob Wills, and Bill Withers.

Lester Young

LesterLester "Pres" YoungLester Young–Buddy Rich Trio
Nicknamed "Lady Day" by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz music and pop singing.
As well as the Kansas City Sessions, his clarinet work from 1938–39 is documented on recordings with Basie, Billie Holiday, Basie small groups, and the organist Glenn Hardman.

Audra McDonald

She is the primary character in the play (later made into a film) Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill; the role was originated by Reenie Upchurch in 1986, and was played by Audra McDonald on Broadway and in the film.
In 2016 she was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie and a Screen Actors Guild Award for her performance in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill for HBO in which McDonald portrayed jazz legend Billie Holiday.

John Hammond (record producer)

John HammondJohn H. HammondJohn Hammond, Jr.
After a turbulent childhood, Holiday began singing in nightclubs in Harlem, where she was heard by the producer John Hammond, who commended her voice.
Hammond was instrumental in sparking or furthering numerous musical careers, including those of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Charlie Christian, Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Teddy Wilson, Big Joe Turner, Pete Seeger, Babatunde Olatunji, Aretha Franklin, George Benson, Freddie Green, Leonard Cohen, Arthur Russell, Jim Copp, Asha Puthli and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Decca Records

DeccaDecca ClassicsDecca Record Company
Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Holiday had mainstream success on labels such as Columbia and Decca.
Artists signed to American Decca in the 1930s and 1940s included Louis Armstrong, Charlie Kunz, Count Basie, Jimmie Lunceford, Jane Froman, the Boswell Sisters, Billie Holiday, Katherine Dunham, the Andrews Sisters, Ted Lewis, Judy Garland, The Mills Brothers, Billy Cotton, Guy Lombardo, Chick Webb, Louis Jordan, Bob Crosby, Bill Kenny & the Ink Spots, the Dorsey Brothers (and subsequently Jimmy Dorsey after the brothers split), Connee Boswell and Jack Hylton, Victor Young, Earl Hines, Claude Hopkins, Ethel Smith, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Clarence Holiday

Eleanora Fagan was born on April 7, 1915, in Philadelphia, the daughter of unwed teenage couple Sarah Julia "Sadie" Fagan and Clarence Holiday.
He was the father of the singer Billie Holiday.

Symphony in Black

Symphony in Black: A Rhapsody of Negro Life
In 1935, Holiday had a small role as a woman abused by her lover in Duke Ellington's musical short film Symphony in Black: A Rhapsody of Negro Life.
The film, Billie Holiday’s screen debut, was directed by Fred Waller and distributed by Paramount Pictures.

Diana Ross

Diane RossDianaHome
Lady Sings the Blues, a film about her life, starring Diana Ross, was released in 1972.
In 1971, Diana Ross began working on her first film, Lady Sings the Blues, which was a loosely based biography on singer Billie Holiday.

Benny Goodman

Benny Goodman OrchestraBenny Goodman and His OrchestraBenny Goodman Quartet
Benny Goodman recalled hearing Holiday in 1931 at the Bright Spot.
and "I Ain't Lazy, I'm Just Dreamin'" sung by Jack Teagarden, "Ol' Pappy" sung by Mildred Bailey, and "Riffin' the Scotch" sung by Billie Holiday.

Billie Dove

She took her professional pseudonym from Billie Dove, an actress she admired, and the musician Clarence Holiday, her probable father.
Dove has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 6351 Hollywood Blvd. Jazz singer Billie Holiday took her professional pseudonym from Dove as an admirer of the actress.

Strange Fruit

the songBitter Fruit (poem)song
Holiday was recording for Columbia in the late 1930s when she was introduced to "Strange Fruit", a song based on a poem about lynching written by Abel Meeropol, a Jewish schoolteacher from the Bronx.
"Strange Fruit" is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939.

DownBeat

Down BeatDownbeat MagazineDown Beat Magazine
Webb and Fitzgerald were declared winners by Metronome magazine, while DownBeat magazine pronounced Holiday and Basie the winners.

I Cried for You

I Cried for You (Now It's Your Turn to Cry Over Me)
"I Cried for You" sold 15,000 copies, which Hammond called "a giant hit for Brunswick.... Most records that made money sold around three to four thousand."
Frank Sinatra interpreted the song in The Joker Is Wild (1957), and Diana Ross sang it in Lady Sings the Blues, personifying Billie Holiday (1972).

I Can't Get Started

(The Last Remake of) I Can't Get StartedCan't Get Started with YouI Can't Get Started (With You)
Her tunes included "I Must Have That Man", "Travelin' All Alone", "I Can't Get Started", and "Summertime", a hit for Holiday in 1936, originating in George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess the year before.
Popular vintage recorded versions are those of Bunny Berigan, Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra.

Miss Brown to You

Miss Brown
Their first collaboration included "What a Little Moonlight Can Do" and "Miss Brown to You".
It was first recorded on July 25, 1935 by Billie Holiday accompanied by Teddy Wilson and his orchestra.

Bessie Smith

BessieBessie "The Empress of the Blues" SmithBessie's Blues
Around this time, she first heard the records of Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith.
In 1933, John Hammond, who also mentored Billie Holiday, asked Smith to record four sides for Okeh (which had been acquired by Columbia Records in 1925).

Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Recital HallWeill Recital HallZankel Hall
After a short prison sentence, she performed at a sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall, but her reputation deteriorated because of her drug and alcohol problems.
Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, Billy Eckstine, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Keith Jarrett, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Simon and Garfunkel, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Taylor, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.