A report on MahaviraJainism and Bimbisara

Statue of Mahavira meditating in the lotus position at Shri Mahavirji, Rajasthan, India.
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
King Bimbisara, depicted in Burmese art, offering his kingdom to the Buddha.
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
King Bimbisara visits the Bamboo Garden (Venuvana) in Rajagriha; artwork from Sanchi
Ancient kingdoms and cities of India at the time of Mahavira
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
Bimbisara's jail, where King Bimbisara was imprisoned, in Rajgir
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
Bimbisara with his royal cortege issuing from the city of Rajagriha to visit the Buddha
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
Bimbisara welcomes the Buddha
Lord Mahavira's Jal Mandir (water temple) in Pawapuri, Bihar, India
A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
The "Charan Paduka" or foot impression of Mahavira at Jal Mandir
Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Folio from the Kalpa Sūtra, 15th century
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
The swastika and five vows
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
Mahavira worship in a manuscript c.1825
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
Mahavira iconography is distinguished by a lion stamped (or carved) beneath his feet; a Shrivatsa is on his chest.
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Mahavira temple, Tirumalai
Shikharji
alt=See caption|Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Samanar Hills, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
Idol of Suparśvanātha
Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Kalugumalai Jain Beds, 8th century
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
alt=See caption|Tallest known image of the seated Mahavira, Patnaganj
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
alt=See caption|Four-sided sculpture of Mahavira in Kankali Tila, Mathura
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
alt=Two nude statues|Tirthankaras Rishabhanatha (left) and Mahavira, 11th century (British Museum)
Ranakpur Jain Temple
alt=Mahavira, seated|Temple relief of Mahavira, 14th century (Seattle Asian Art Museum)
Dilwara Temples
alt=See caption|Relief of Mahavira in Thirakoil, Tamil Nadu
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
16-foot, 2-inch stone statue of Mahavira in Ahinsa Sthal, Mehrauli, New Delhi{{sfn|Titze|1998|p=266}}|alt=Large outdoor statue of Mahavira, with a seated worshipper for scale
Girnar Jain temples
alt=See caption|Mahavira statue in Cave 32 of the Ellora Caves
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
Mahavira inside Ambapuram cave temple, 7th century
Lodhurva Jain temple
alt=Dharmachakra temple|Dharmachakra temple in Gajpanth
Palitana temples
alt=Shri Mahavirji|Shri Mahavirji
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
Jain Center of Greater Phoenix
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Jain temple, Potters Bar
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Mahavir Swami at Manilaxmi Tirth, Gujarat
Hutheesing Jain Temple

Mahavira (Sanskrit: महावीर) also known as Vardhamana, was the 24th Tirthankara (supreme preacher) of Jainism.

- Mahavira

Jainism traces its spiritual ideas and history through the succession of twenty-four Tirthankaras (supreme preachers of Dharma), with the first in the current time cycle being Rishabhadeva, whom the tradition holds to have lived millions of years ago; the twenty-third tirthankara Parshvanatha, whom historians date to 9th century BCE; and the twenty-fourth tirthankara, Mahavira around 600 BCE.

- Jainism

He frequently visited Samavasarana of Lord Mahavira seeking answers to his queries.

- Bimbisara

His second wife, Chellana, was a Licchavi princess from Vaishali and daughter of the Jain king Chetaka.

- Bimbisara

Jain tradition mentions Srenika and Kunika of Haryanka dynasty (popularly known as Bimbisara and Ajatashatru) and Chetaka of Videha as his royal followers.

- Mahavira

Kings Bimbisara (c.

- Jainism
Statue of Mahavira meditating in the lotus position at Shri Mahavirji, Rajasthan, India.

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Statue of Gautama Buddha, preaching his first sermon at Sarnath; B(b) 181, Archaeological Museum Sarnath, Gupta period, ca. 475 CE.

Gautama Buddha

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Ascetic and spiritual teacher of South Asia who lived during the latter half of the first millennium BCE.

Ascetic and spiritual teacher of South Asia who lived during the latter half of the first millennium BCE.

Statue of Gautama Buddha, preaching his first sermon at Sarnath; B(b) 181, Archaeological Museum Sarnath, Gupta period, ca. 475 CE.
Seated Buddha from Tapa Shotor monastery in Hadda, Afghanistan, 2nd century CE
Ancient kingdoms and cities of India during the time of the Buddha (c. 500 BCE)
Inscription "The illumination of the Blessed Sakamuni" (Brahmi script: 𑀪𑀕𑀯𑀢𑁄 𑀲𑀓𑀫𑀼𑀦𑀺𑀦𑁄 𑀩𑁄𑀥𑁄, Bhagavato Sakamunino Bodho) on a relief showing the "empty" Illumination Throne of the Buddha in the early Mahabodhi Temple at Bodh Gaya. Bharhut, c. 100 BCE.
One of the earliest anthropomorphic representations of the Buddha, here surrounded by Brahma (left) and Śakra (right). Bimaran Casket, mid-1st century CE, British Museum.
Māyā miraculously giving birth to Siddhārtha. Sanskrit, palm-leaf manuscript. Nālandā, Bihar, India. Pāla period
The legendary Jataka collections depict the Buddha-to-be in a previous life prostrating before the past Buddha Dipankara, making a resolve to be a Buddha, and receiving a prediction of future Buddhahood.
Map showing Lumbini and other major Buddhist sites in India. Lumbini (present-day Nepal), is the birthplace of the Buddha, and is a holy place also for many non-Buddhists.
The Lumbini pillar contains an inscription stating that this is the Buddha's birthplace
The "Great Departure" of Siddhartha Gautama, surrounded by a halo, he is accompanied by numerous guards and devata who have come to pay homage; Gandhara, Kushan period
Prince Siddhartha shaves his hair and becomes a sramana. Borobudur, 8th century
The gilded "Emaciated Buddha statue" in Wat Suthat in Bangkok representing the stage of his asceticism
The Mahabodhi Tree at the Sri Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya
The Enlightenment Throne of the Buddha at Bodh Gaya, as recreated by Emperor Ashoka in the 3rd century BCE.
Miracle of the Buddha walking on the River Nairañjanā. The Buddha is not visible (aniconism), only represented by a path on the water, and his empty throne bottom right. Sanchi.
Dhamek Stupa in Sarnath, India, site of the first teaching of the Buddha in which he taught the Four Noble Truths to his first five disciples
The chief disciples of the Buddha, Mogallana (chief in psychic power) and Sariputta (chief in wisdom).
The remains of a section of Jetavana Monastery, just outside of ancient Savatthi, in Uttar Pradesh.
Mahāprajāpatī, the first bhikkuni and Buddha's stepmother, ordains
This East Javanese relief depicts the Buddha in his final days, and Ānanda, his chief attendant.
Mahaparinirvana, Gandhara, 3rd or 4th century CE, gray schist
Mahaparinibbana scene, from the Ajanta caves
Buddha's cremation stupa, Kushinagar (Kushinara).
Piprahwa vase with relics of the Buddha. The inscription reads: ...salilanidhane Budhasa Bhagavate... (Brahmi script: ...𑀲𑀮𑀺𑀮𑀦𑀺𑀥𑀸𑀦𑁂 𑀩𑀼𑀥𑀲 𑀪𑀕𑀯𑀢𑁂...) "Relics of the Buddha Lord".
The Bodhisattva meets with Alara Kalama, Borobudur relief.
Gandharan Buddhist birchbark scroll fragments
Buddha meets a Brahmin, at the Indian Museum, Kolkata
Schist Buddha statue with the famed Ye Dharma Hetu dhāraṇī around the head, which was used as a common summary of Dependent Origination. It states: "Of those experiences that arise from a cause, The Tathāgata has said: 'this is their cause, And this is their cessation': This is what the Great Śramaṇa teaches."
Gandharan sculpture depicting the Buddha in the full lotus seated meditation posture, 2nd-3rd century CE
Buddha Statues from Gal Vihara. The Early Buddhist texts also mention meditation practice while standing and lying down.
The Buddha on a coin of Kushan ruler Kanishka I, c. 130 CE.
Buddhist monks from Nepal. According to the earliest sources, the Buddha looked like a typical shaved man from northeast India.
Buddha depicted as the 9th avatar of god Vishnu in a traditional Hindu representation
Christ and Buddha by Paul Ranson, 1880
A Royal Couple Visits the Buddha, from railing of the Bharhut Stupa, Shunga dynasty, early 2nd century BC.
Adoration of the Diamond Throne and the Bodhi Tree, Bharhut.
Descent of the Buddha from the Trayastrimsa Heaven, Sanchi Stupa No. 1.
The Buddha's Miracle at Kapilavastu, Sanchi Stupa 1.
Bimbisara visiting the Buddha (represented as empty throne) at the Bamboo garden in Rajagriha
The great departure with riderless horse, Amaravati, 2nd century CE.
The Assault of Mara, Amaravati, 2nd century CE.
Isapur Buddha, one of the earliest physical depictions of the Buddha, c. 15 CE.<ref>{{cite book |last1=Quintanilla |first1=Sonya Rhie |title=History of Early Stone Sculpture at Mathura: Ca. 150 BCE – 100 CE |date=2007 |publisher=BRILL |isbn=9789004155374 |pages=199–206, 204 for the exact date |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=X7Cb8IkZVSMC&pg=PA204}}</ref> Art of Mathura
The Buddha attended by Indra at Indrasala Cave, Mathura 50-100 CE.
Buddha Preaching in Tushita Heaven. Amaravati, Satavahana period, 2d century CE. Indian Museum, Calcutta.
Standing Buddha from Gandhara.
Gandharan Buddha with Vajrapani-Herakles.
Kushan period Buddha Triad.
Buddha statue from Sanchi.
Birth of the Buddha, Kushan dynasty, late 2nd to early 3rd century CE.
The Infant Buddha Taking A Bath, Gandhara 2nd century CE.
6th century Gandharan Buddha.
Buddha at Cave No. 6, Ajanta Caves.
Standing Buddha, c. 5th Century CE.
Sarnath standing Buddha, 5th century CE.
Seated Buddha, Gupta period.
Seated Buddha at Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka.
Chinese Stele with Sakyamuni and Bodhisattvas, Wei period, 536 CE.
The Shakyamuni Daibutsu Bronze, c. 609, Nara, Japan.
Amaravati style Buddha of Srivijaya period, Palembang, Indonesia, 7th century.
Korean Seokguram Cave Buddha, c. 774 CE.
Seated Buddha Vairocana flanked by Avalokiteshvara and Vajrapani of Mendut temple, Central Java, Indonesia, early 9th century.
Buddha in the exposed stupa of Borobudur mandala, Central Java, Indonesia, c. 825.
Vairocana Buddha of Srivijaya style, Southern Thailand, 9th century.
Seated Buddha, Japan, Heian period, 9th-10th century.
Attack of Mara, 10th century, Dunhuang.
Cambodian Buddha with Mucalinda Nāga, c. 1100 CE, Banteay Chhmar, Cambodia
15th century Sukhothai Buddha.
15th century Sukhothai Walking Buddha.
Sakyamuni, Lao Tzu, and Confucius, c. from 1368 until 1644.
Chinese depiction of Shakyamuni, 1600.
Shakyamuni Buddha with Avadana Legend Scenes, Tibetan, 19th century
Golden Thai Buddha statue, Bodh Gaya.
Gautama statue, Shanyuan Temple, Liaoning Province, China.
Burmese style Buddha, Shwedagon pagoda, Yangon.
Large Gautama Buddha statue in Buddha Park of Ravangla.

Jina – Conqueror. Although the term is more commonly used to name an individual who has attained liberation in the religion Jainism, it is also an alternative title for the Buddha.

Most of them accept that the Buddha lived, taught, and founded a monastic order during the Mahajanapada era and during the reign of Bimbisara (c.

558, or c. 400 BCE), the ruler of the Magadha empire, and died during the early years of the reign of Ajatashatru, who was the successor of Bimbisara, thus making him a younger contemporary of Mahavira, the Jain tirthankara.

Jarasandha's Akhara

Rajgir

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Historic town in the district of Nalanda in Bihar, India.

Historic town in the district of Nalanda in Bihar, India.

Jarasandha's Akhara
Gautama Buddha spent a substantial amount of time here.
The historic locality is surrounded by the Rajgir hills and remains of cyclopean walls.
Boar's Cave
Closeup of Buddha at Vishwa Shanti Stupa
Rope way from the 1960s
One of the caves. (Caddy 1895)

The town is also notable in Jainism and Buddhism.

It was the birthplace of the 20th Jain Tirthankar Munisuvrata, and is closely associated with the Mahavira and Gautama Buddha.

Both Mahavira and Buddha taught their beliefs in Rajgir during the 6th and 5th century BC, and the Buddha was offered a forest monastery here by the king Bimbisara.

Royal procession leaving Rajagriha, possibly depicting Ajatashatru, from Sanchi

Ajatashatru

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Ajatasattu (Pāli Ajātasattu ) or Ajatashatru (Sanskrit Ajātaśatru ) in Buddhist tradition, or Kunika (Kūṇika) and Kuniya (Kūṇiya) in the Jain histories, (c.

Ajatasattu (Pāli Ajātasattu ) or Ajatashatru (Sanskrit Ajātaśatru ) in Buddhist tradition, or Kunika (Kūṇika) and Kuniya (Kūṇiya) in the Jain histories, (c.

Royal procession leaving Rajagriha, possibly depicting Ajatashatru, from Sanchi
Bimbisara jail where king Bimbisara kept in custody by his own son king Ajatashatru
The Sattapanni cave in which the first Buddhist council held was sponsored by King Ajatashatru.

He was the son of King Bimbisara and was a contemporary of both Mahavira and Gautama Buddha.

According to Jainism, Ajatashatru was born to King Bimbisara and Queen Chelna; Buddhist tradition records Ajatashatru being born to Bimbisara and Kosala Devi.