Binge eating disorder

Binge Eatingbinge-eating disorderBinge Eating Disorder (BED)compulsive overeating
Binge eating disorder (BED) is an eating disorder characterized by frequent and recurrent binge eating episodes with associated negative psychological and social problems, but without subsequent purging episodes (e.g. vomiting).wikipedia
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Eating disorder

eating disorderseatingdisordered eating
Binge eating disorder (BED) is an eating disorder characterized by frequent and recurrent binge eating episodes with associated negative psychological and social problems, but without subsequent purging episodes (e.g. vomiting).
They include binge eating disorder, where people eat a large amount in a short period of time; anorexia nervosa, where people eat very little due to a fear of gaining weight and thus have a low body weight; bulimia nervosa, where people eat a lot and then try to rid themselves of the food; pica, where people eat non-food items; rumination syndrome, where people regurgitate food; avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), where people have a lack of interest in food; and a group of other specified feeding or eating disorders.

Bulimia nervosa

bulimiabulimicbulimics
BED is a recently described condition, which was required to distinguish binge eating similar to that seen in bulimia nervosa but without characteristic purging.
Other similar disorders include binge eating disorder, Kleine-Levin syndrome, and borderline personality disorder.

Binge eating

bingebinge eatbinging
Binge eating disorder (BED) is an eating disorder characterized by frequent and recurrent binge eating episodes with associated negative psychological and social problems, but without subsequent purging episodes (e.g. vomiting).
It is a common symptom of eating disorders such as binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa.

Food addiction

sugar addictioncompulsive overeatingaddiction to food
Individuals who are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder exhibit similar patterns of compulsive overeating, neurobiological features of dysfunctional cognitive control and food addiction, and biological and environmental risk factors.
The person’s behavior then begins to shift when the need for more food is not met, in that when the urge is met, binge eating, obesity and bulimia can result as a consequence.

DSM-5

DSM-Vmental health disordersDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Previously considered a topic for further research exploration, binge eating disorder was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013.
Notable changes in the DSM-5 include the reconceptualization of Asperger syndrome from a distinct disorder to an autism spectrum disorder; the elimination of subtypes of schizophrenia; the deletion of the "bereavement exclusion" for depressive disorders; the renaming of gender identity disorder to gender dysphoria, along with a revised treatment plan; the inclusion of binge eating disorder as a discrete eating disorder; the renaming and reconceptualization of paraphilias to paraphilic disorders; the removal of the axis system; and the splitting of disorders not otherwise specified into other specified disorders and unspecified disorders.

Overeating

excessive eatingdesireOver eating
BED is characterized more by overeating than dietary restriction and over concern about body shape.
Overeating can be a symptom of binge eating disorder or bulimia nervosa.

Lisdexamfetamine

Vyvanselisdexamfetamine dimesylatelisdexamphetamine
Counselling and certain medication, such as lisdexamfetamine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs), may help.
Lisdexamfetamine, sold under the brand name Vyvanse among others, is a medication that is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in people over the age of five as well as for moderate to severe binge eating disorder in adults.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

SSRIselective serotonin reuptake inhibitorsSSRIs
Counselling and certain medication, such as lisdexamfetamine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs), may help.
Similar recommendations apply to binge eating disorder.

Overeaters Anonymous

Anorexia AnonymousEaters Anonymousfood
There is the 12-step Overeaters Anonymous or Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous.
Overeaters Anonymous (OA) is a twelve-step program for people with problems related to food including, but not limited to, compulsive overeaters, those with binge eating disorder, bulimics and anorexics.

Antidepressant

antidepressantsanti-depressantanti-depressants
Three other classes of medications are also used in the treatment of binge eating disorder: antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and anti-obesity medications.
Similar recommendations apply to binge eating disorder.

Unspecified feeding or eating disorder

ED-NOSEating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified
Until 2013, binge eating disorder was categorized as an Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, an umbrella category for eating disorders that don't fall under the categories for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.
UFED is an eating disorder that does not meet the criteria for: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or OSFED.

Albert Stunkard

Albert J. Stunkard
The disorder was first described in 1959 by psychiatrist and researcher Albert Stunkard as "night eating syndrome" (NES).
He is known for his first descriptions of binge eating disorder and night eating syndrome in the 1950s.

Night eating syndrome

sleep eatingsleepeating
The disorder was first described in 1959 by psychiatrist and researcher Albert Stunkard as "night eating syndrome" (NES).
Although there is some degree of comorbidity with binge eating disorder, it differs from binge eating in that the amount of food consumed in the evening/night is not necessarily objectively large nor is a loss of control over food intake required.

Obesity

obesemorbidly obeseoverweight
While people of a healthy weight may overeat occasionally, an ongoing habit of consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time may ultimately lead to weight gain and obesity.
Medical illnesses that increase obesity risk include several rare genetic syndromes (listed above) as well as some congenital or acquired conditions: hypothyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, growth hormone deficiency, and some eating disorders such as binge eating disorder and night eating syndrome.

Anorexia nervosa

anorexiaanorexicanorexics
Binge eating is one of the most prevalent eating disorders among adults, though there tends to be less media coverage and research about the disorder in comparison to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

Laxative

purgativelaxativesEx-Lax
In contrast to bulimia nervosa, binge eating episodes are not regularly followed by activities intended to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting, laxative or enema misuse, or strenuous exercise.

Enema

enemasclysterproctoclysis
In contrast to bulimia nervosa, binge eating episodes are not regularly followed by activities intended to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting, laxative or enema misuse, or strenuous exercise.

Childhood obesity

child obesityobesitychild
Other risk factors may include childhood obesity, critical comments about weight, low self-esteem, depression, and physical or sexual abuse in childhood.

Heritability

heritablebreeder's equationheritabilities
Studies have shown that binge eating tends to run in families and a twin study by Bulik, Sullivan, and Kendler has shown a, "moderate heritability for binge eating" at 41 percent.

International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems

International Classification of DiseasesICDICD-9
ICD-11 may contain a dedicated entry (6B62), defining BED as frequent, recurrent episodes of binge eating (once a week or more over a period of several months) which are not regularly followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors aimed at preventing weight gain.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSM-IVDSM-IV-TRDSM
Because it was not a recognized psychiatric disorder in the DSM-IV until 2013, it has been difficult to obtain insurance reimbursement for treatments.

Cognitive behavioral therapy

cognitive behavioural therapycognitive-behavioral therapyCBT
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment has been demonstrated as a more effective form of treatment for BED than behavioral weight loss programs.

Psychotherapy

psychotherapistpsychotherapeutictherapy
Recent reviews have concluded that psychological interventions such as psychotherapy and behavioral interventions are more effective than pharmacological interventions for the treatment of binge eating disorder.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

There is the 12-step Overeaters Anonymous or Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous.